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Full text of "Recital programs 1929-1930"

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List of Concerts and Operas 

Faculty Recitals 

^Louis Bailly, Viola \ 

'^^^^^ V, T w 7- >November 13, 1929 

Ilea Luboshutz, Viohn ) 

Second Harriet van Emden, Soprano November 20, 1929 

Third Lynnwood Farnam, Organ December 4, 1929 

Fourth Lea Luboshutz, Violin December 12, 1929 

(IsABELLE Vengerova, Piano j 

Fifth A EA Luboshutz, Violin Manuary 8, 1930 

(^Felix Salmond, Violoncello 1 

Sixth Horatio Connell, Baritone January 15, 1930 

/Felix Salmond, Violoncello ■) 

Seventh ^ >March 12, 1930 

(Harry Kaufman, Piano } 

Eighth Anton Torello, Double Bass. . . .March 17, 1930 

Ninth Josef Hofmann, Piano March 19, 1930 

Tenth Efrem Zimbalist, Violin March 26, 1930 

Eleventh Emilio de Gogorza, Baritone April 2, 1930 

(Carlos Salzedo, Harp J 

Twelfth (William M. Kincaid, Flute ;May 7, 1930 

(^Felix Salmond, Violoncello J 



Complimentary Recital 
The Musical Art Quartet December 1, 1929 



Students' Concerts 

(These programs, while listed alphabetically according to Instructor's name, 
are bound according to date.) 

Students of Professor Auer March 24, 1930 

Students of Mr. Bachmann January 13, 1930 

f November 7, 1929 
December 5, 12, 1929 
January 23, 1930 
Students of Mr. Bailly in Chamber Music. . -/February 17 27 1930 

March 27, 1930 
'April 10, 1930 
iMay 13, 22, 1930 

Students of Mr. Bailly in Viola ) ' 

(May 28, 1930 

Students of Mr. Cailliet May 20, 1930 

Students of Mr. Connell May 8, 1930 

Students of Mr. de Gogorza April 30, 1930 

„ , r X, -a (November 12, 1929 

Students of Mr. Farnam < 

(May 27, 1930 

Students of Mr. Guetter May 20, 1930 

Students of Mr. Hofmann May 21, 1930 

Students of Mr. Horner April 17, 1930 

Students of Mr. Kincaid April 15, 1930 

Students of Mr. Lambert November 25, 1929 

_ , ^ - , ^ (December 2, 1929 

Students of Madame Luboshutz < 

(May 12, 1930 

Students of Mr. Salmond April 9, 1930 

CI r xjf a (February 24, 1930 

Students of Mr. Salzedo < 

(April 7, 1930 

Students of Mr. Saperton May 26, 1930 

Students of Mr. Scalero .May 5, 1930 

Students of Madame Sembrich May 9, 1930 

Students of Mr. Tabuteau in Wind Ensemble . February 10, 1930 
Students of Mr. Torello April 15, 1930 



Students of Miss van Emden May 1, 1930 

Students of Madame Vengerova May 14, 1930 

{December 17, 1929 
April 28, 1930 
May 15, 1930 
/February 5, 12, 1930 

The Curtis Orchestra < March 9, 1930 

lApril 29, 1930 

Chamber Music 

/November 10, 1929 
\ December 15, 1929 

The Pennsylvania Museum of Art Manuary 26, 1930 

1930 
. 1930 

Concert Course 



•Manuary 2 
JMarch 2, 
(April 13, 



Columbia Borough School District, Columbia, 

Pennsylvania November 18, 1929 

(November 21, 1929 
University of Delaware, Newark, Delaware. . < February 20, 1930 

'March 20, 1930 

George School, George School, Pennsylvania .. November 23, 1929 

Western Maryland College, Westminster, 

Maryland November 25, 1929 

Westtown School, Westtown, Pennsylvania ... .December 6, 1929 

State Teachers' College, East Stroudsburg, ^December 13, 1929 
Pennsylvania (January 31, 1930 

Cedar Crest College for Women, AUentown, 

Pennsylvania December 14, 1929 

The Contemporary Club, Trenton, New Jersey. . January 9, 1930 

The Hill School, Pottstown, Pennsylvania . . . . < ' 

(February 2, 1930 

Crescendo Club, Atlantic City, New Jersey. . . . January 22, 1930 

Mar>^vood College, Scranton, Pennsylvania. . . . January 30, 1930 



Haddon Fortnightly Club, Haddonfield, 

New Jersey February 5, 1930 

State Teachers' College, West Chester, ^February 6, 1930 

Pennsylvania (March 27, 1930 

Dorset Players, Dorset, Vermont February 15, 1930 

Octave Club, Norristown, Pennsylvania February 19, 1930 

Century Club, Coatesville, Pennsylvania April 14, 1930 

Salon Music Club, Lambertville, New Jersey... May 1, 1930 

Performances of Philadelphia Grand Opera Company in 
affiliation with The Curtis Institute of Music 

First Carmen .October 23, 1929 

Second Le Jongleur de Notre Dame .October 31, 1929 

Third Madama Butterfly November 14, 1929 

Fourth Lakme November 28, 1929 

Fifth Cavalleria Rusticana and 

Pagll^cci December 9, 1929 

Sixth Judith and II Serraglio December 26, 1929 

Seventh Lohengrin .February 6, 1930 

Eighth Rigoletto February 20, 1930 

Ninth TiEFLAND February 26, 1930 

Tenth La Traviata March 6, 1930 

Eleventh Un Ballo in Maschera April 10, 1930 

Twelfth AiDA April 24, 1930 




The Curtis Institute of Music 



CASIMIR HALL 
SIXTH SEASON, 1929-1930 



First Faculty Recital 



LOUIS BAILLY, Violist 

LEA LUBOSHUTZ, Violinist 
Collaborating 

Harry Kaufman at the Piano 



V^ednesday Evening, l^ovemher 13, 1929 

at 8.30 o'cloc\ 



The Steinwat is the official piano of The Curtis Institute oj Music 



Programme 



JOHANN Sebastian Bach . . Sixth Brandenburg Concerto, in B flat major, 

for Two Violas (with accompaniment of three 
violoncelli and two double basses. Organ 
obligato by F. A. Gevaert) 

Allegro moderate 
Adagio ma non tanto 
Allegro 

Mr. Bailly 
Max Aronoff 



Orlando Cole 
Frank Miller 
David Filerman 



> Violoncelli 



Jack Posell | 

Oscar Zimmerman J 

Carl Weinrich, Organ 

Conducted by Sylvan Levin 



Double Basses 



Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart . . Symphonie Concertante, in E flat major, 

for Violin, Viola and Chamber Orchestra 

Allegro maestoso 

Andante 

Presto 

Madame Luboshutz 
Mr. Bailly 



Chamber Orchestra 



Paul Gershman 

Iso Briselli I ... ,. 

> Violins 
James Bloom 

Jack Kash 

Leon Frengut ly t 
Paull Ferguson j 



Jack Posell, Double Bass 



Frank Miller 
David Filerman 



Theodore Seder ( 
Henry Whitehead j 



Robert Bloom | „, 
„ TT >• Oboes 

Robert Hester I 



French Horns 



• Violoncelli 

Conducted by Sylvan Levin 



Programme 

Ernest BlOCH Smte for Viola and Orchestra 

(Piano version by the 
Composer) 

Lento — Allegro — Moderato 
Allegro ironico 
Lento 
Molto vivo 

Mr. Bailly 
Mr. Kaufman 



Joseph JoXGEN Suite for Viola and Orchestra, Opus 48 

(Piano version by the Composer) 

Poeme filegiaque 
Final 

Mr. Bailly 
Mr. Kaufman 



Students taking part in this Recital are members of 
Mr. Bailly's Classes in Chamber Music 




The Curtis Institute of Music 



CASIMIR HALL 
Sixth Season— 1929-1930 



Second Faculty Recital 



MARRIET VAN EMDEN, Soprano 

Harry Kaufman at the Piano 



Wednesday Evening, l^ovemher 20, 1929 
at 8.30 o'chc\ 



The Steinwat is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 



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Programme 
I. 

Victor Dourlen "Je sais attacher des rubans" 

Andre E. M. Gretry "Arietta" from "Les Deux 

Avares" 
Henry Purcell "Dido's Lament" from "Dido 

and Aeneas" 
Old English "Shepherd! Thy demeanor 

var>''" 



n. 

( Nachtlied 

Felix Mendelssohn -JNeue Liebe 

/ HexenHed 

^ , , (Das Irdische Leben 

GusTAV Mahler j.^Liebst du um Schonheit' 



m. 

Richard Wagner "Dich, theure Halle" from 

"Tannhauser" 



IV. 

Georges Bizet Agnus Dei 

(With organ accompaniment played by Alexander McCurdy, Jr.) 

Feldc Fourdrain Les Abeilles 

Jacques Dalcroze L'Oiseau Bleu 

Gustav Charpentier "Depuis le jour" from 

"Louise" 



The organ is an Aeolian 

? l lll ll l l[ i nilMiiiiiiiiniiiiiiimiiiinii iinii i iii i i n iiiiiiiii n iiii i iiii Mni iiiTii ii iiiMiiiiniiiimiiiiniiiii i i iiiiiniiiiiiiiniiiiiiii iiiiiniiniiiii i ^ji 



"Je sais attacher des Rubans" 

Je sais attacher des rubans, 

Je sais comment viennent les roses, 

Des oiseaux je sais tons les chants, 
Je sais milles petites choses. 

Mais je sens palpiter men coeur, 
Pourquoi? Je n'en sais rien encore. 

Peutetre, helas, que le bonheur 
Est dans les choses que j 'ignore. 

Je sais comme un oiseau naissant 

Eclot sous le sein de sa mere, 

Comme un tourtereau carressant 

A sa compagne cherche a plaire. 

Mais je sens palpiter mon coeur, 
Pourquoi? Je n'en sais rien encore. 

Peutetre, helas, que le bonheur 
Est dans les chose que j 'ignore. 



(Translation) 

I know how to tie ribbon bows, 
I know how to gather posies, 

I know ev'ry path of the vale, 

I know ev'ry charm it discloses. 

But my heart goes pit-a-pat. 

Wherefore? Indeed I know not. 

Perhaps, alas, joys yet untasted 

Dwell in the core of that I know not. 

I've peep'd into ev'ry nest. 

That hides in the brakes and sedges, 
The ring dove's note I have heard 

When his love to his mate he pledges. 

But my heart goes pit-a-pat, 

Wherefore? Indeed I know not. 

Perhaps, alas, joys yet untasted 

Dv/ell in the core of that I know not. 



Arietta from "Les Deux Avares' 

Plus de depit, plus de tristesse, 
Des que je puis voler vers toi; 

De Gripon je plains la faiblesse, 
Et je chante, quand je te vols. 

II se croit riche, 6 le pauvre homme, 
L'or et I'argent sont tout son bien. 

Moi, j'ai le coeur de Jerome; 

Mon tresor vaut mieux que le sien. 



(Translation) 

No more annoy, sorrowful meekness. 
Since I can fly away to thee; 

Poor Gripon! I deplore his weakness, 
And I carol when thee I see. 

He thinks he's wealthy, poor silly fellow. 
Who only silver has and gold; 

Mine is Jerome's full affection 

Greater by far my treasure, I hold. 



Dido's Lament 

When I am laid in earth, may my wrongs create 

No trouble in thy breast; 

Remember me, but ah! Forget my fate! 



Shepherd! Thy Demeanor Vary 

Shepherd! Thy demeanor vary. 
Dance and sing, be light and airy. 
Would you win me, you must woo 
As a lover brave and true. 
Hums and ha's, dull looks and sighing. 
And such simple methods trying, 
Never will this heait subdue, 
I must catch the flame from you. 
Fa la la. 



Nachtlied 

Vergangen ist der lichte Tag, 
Von feme kommt der Glockenschlag; 
So reist die Zeit die ganze Nacht, 
Nimmt manchen mit, der's nicht gedacht. 

Wo ist nun hin die bunte Lust, 
Des Freundes Trost und treue Brust, 
Der Liebsten siisser Augenschein? 
Will keiner mit mir munter sein? 

Frisch auf denn, liebe Nachtigall, 
Du Wasserfall mit hellem Schall, 
Gott loben wollen wir vereint. 
Bis dass der lichte Morgen scheint. 



(Translation) 

Night Song 

Departed is the light of day. 
The bells are chiming far away. 
Time thru the night his way will take. 
And many sleep, who ne'er shall wake. 

Now where all life's glow and zest, 
The friend's kind heart and loyal breast. 
The tender beam in love-lit eyes? 
And no one, no one to my call replies. 

Sweet nightingale, awake and sing! 
"Thou waterfall, resounding ring! 
God let us praise together here, 
Until the morning shall appear. 



Neue Liebe 

In dem Mondenschein im Walde 
Sah ich jiingst die Elfen reiten, 
Ihre Horner hort' ich klingen, 
Ihre Glocklein hort' ich lauten, 

Ihre weissen Rosslein trugen 
Gold'nes Hirschgeweih' und flogen 
Rasch dahin; wie wilde Schwane 
Kam es durch die Luft gezogen. 

Lachelnd nickte mir die Kon'gin, 
Lachelnd, im Voruberreiten, 
Gait das meiner neuen Liebe? 
Oder soil es Tod bedeuten? 



(Translation) 

New Love 

In the moon-lit wood I lately 
Saw the elfin riders bounding, 
All their tiny bells a-tinkling, 
All their merry horns a-sounding. 

Every tiny, snow-white charger. 
Golden antlers proudly tossing. 

Flew along, 
'Twas like a flight of swans 
The silent forest crossing, flew. 

With a nod and smile in passing. 
Now the Fairy Queen rode by me. 
Does it mean my love shall prosper? 
Can it be that death is nigh me? 



Hexenlied 

Die Schwalbe fliegt. der Frtihling siegt 
Und spendet uns Blumen zum Kranze; 
Bald huschen wir leis' aus der Tiir 
Und fliegen zum prachtigen Tanze. 

Ein schwarzer Bock, ein Besenstock, 
Die Ofengabel, der Wocken 
Reisst uns geschwind, wie Blitz und Wind 
Durch sausende Liifte zum Brocken. 

Um Belzebub tanzt unser Trupp 
Und kiisst ihm die kralligen Hande! 
Ein Geisterschwarm fasst uns beim Arm 
Und schwinget im Tanzen die Brande! 

Und Belzebub verheisst dem Trupp 
Der Tanzenden Gaben auf Gaben; 
Sie sollen schon in Seide geh'n 
Und Topfe voU Goldes sich graben. 

Ein Feuerdrach umflieget das Dach 

Und bringet uns Butter und Eier. 

Die Nachbarn dann seh'n die Funken weh'n, 

Und schlagen ein Kreuz vor dem Feuer. 

Die Schwalbe fliegt, der Friihling siegt, 
Die Blumen erbliihen zum Kranze, 
Bald huschen wir leise aus der Tiir 
Juchheissa zum prachtigen Tanze. 



(Translation) 

Witches' Song 

The swallow flies, and Winter dies, 
For flowery Spring is advancing. 

Now in the night we'll soon take flight. 
And hey! for our glorious dancing. 

Ridmg a rout on broom or goat 

-'\nd tongs and shovels we'll flock on. 

Mounting sky-high, away we'll fly 
Like mad — on the wind — to the Brocken. 

By Satan's seat, our troops will flit. 

And kiss him his claw till it scorches; 

Ghosts in a swarm, with welcome warm. 
Will brandish their wavering torches! 

Satan will chaff our troops, and laugh. 
And promise whatever we'd rather; 

All of our ilk shall dress in silk. 
And gold by the handful we'll gather. 

With fiery eye, a dragon will fly 

For butter and eggs to the neighbors; 

And signing the cross they'll mourn their loss. 
We'll live on the fruit of their labors. 

The swallow flies, and Winter dies. 
For flowery Spring is advancing. 

Now in the night we'll soon take flight, 
And rally for glorious dancing. 



Das irdische Leben 

"Mutter, ach Mutter! es hungert mich, 
Gib mir Brot, sonst sterbe ich." 
"Warte nur, mein liebes Kind! 
Morgen wollen wir emten geschwind." 
Und als das Korn geerntet war, 
Rief das Kind noch immerdar: 

"Mutter, ach Mutter! es hungert mich, 
Gib mir Brot, sonst sterbe ich." 
"Warte nur, mein liebes Kind, 
Morgen wollen wir dreschen geschwind." 
Und als das Korn gedroschen war, 
Rief das Kind noch immerdar: 

"Mutter, ach Mutter! es hungert mich, 
Gib mir Brot, sonst sterbe ich." 
"Warte nur, mein liebes Kind! 
Morgen wollen wir backen geschwind." 
Und als das Brot gebacken war. 
Lag das Kind auf der Totenbahr'. 



(Translation) 

Earthly Life 

"Mother, O Mother, so hungry I, 

Give me bread or I shall die!" 

"Wait a while! Wait a while, my darling- 

We tomorrow will reaping go." 

When the com was reaped next sun, 

Still the child's sad cry went on: 

"Mother, O Mother, so hungry I, 

Give me bread or I shall die!" 

"Wait a while, wait a while, my darling — O, 

We tomorrow thrashing will go." 

\Vhen the corn was thrashed next sun, 

Still the child's sad cry went on: 

"Mother, O Mother, so hungry I, 

Give me bread or I shall die!" 

"Wait a while, my darling — O, 

We tomorrow baking will go." 

Ajid when the bread was baked next day, 

Cold the child in the coffin lay! 



^m 



I iiiii n i n i i iiii i i m m il l l ! iiniiiMiiiiii| | | | i i|||||||||||| | | | || || | | |||inini 



iiiiii'iM I mill iiiiiiiMiiiiiii ini 



iMMiiiiiiiiiiijni ^^ 



Liebst du um Schonheit 

Liebst du um Schonheit, o nicht mich liebe, 
Liiebe die Sonne, sie tragt ein gold'nes Haar; 
Liebst du um Jugend, o nicht mich liebe. 
Liebe den Friihling, der jung ist jedes Jahr; 
Liebst du um Schatze, o nicht mich liebe, 
Liebe die Meerfrau, sie hat viel Perlen klar; 
Liebst du um Liebe, o ja mich liebe, 
Liebe mich immer, dich lieb' ich immerdar. 



(Translation) 

''Lov'st Thou Beauty?" 

Lov'st thou beauty, oh love not me! 

Love the sun, she wears golden hair! — 

Lov'st thou youth, oh love not me! 

Love the spring, that is young every year! 

Lov'st thou wealth, oh love not me! 

Love the sea-nymph, she has many clear pearls! 

Lov'st thou love, oh then, love me! 

Love me ever, thee love I always, eternally. 



''Dich, theure Halle" from 
''Tannhauser" 

Dich, theure Halle, griiss' ich wieder, 
Froh griiss' ich dich, geliebter Raum! 

In dir erwachen seine Lieder 

Und wecken mich aus diist'rem Traum! 

Da Er aus dir geschieden, 

Wie 6d' erscheinst du mir! 
Aus mir entfloh der Frieden, 

Die Freude zog aus dir! 

Wie jetzt mein Busen hoch sich hebet. 
So scheinst du jetzt mir stolz und hehr; 

Der mich und dich so neu belebet, 
Nicht liinger weilt er feme mehr! 

Sei mir gegrusst, 
Sei mir gegrusst! 
Du, theure Halle, 
Sei mir gegrusst! 



(Translatian) 

"Hall of Song" from "Tannhauser' 

O, hall of song, I give thee greeting, 
All hail to thee, thou hallow'd place! 

'Twas here that dream, so sweet and fleeting, 
Upon my heart his song did trace. 

But since by him forsaken, 

A desert thou dost seem! 
Thy echoes only waken 

Remembrance of our dream. 

But now the flame of hope is lighted, 
Thy vault shall ring with glorious war, 

For he, whose strains my soul delighted, 
From me no longer roams afar! 

All hail to thee! 
All hail to thee! 
Thou hall of glory. 
Dear to my heart! 



Agnus Dei 

Agnus Dei! 

Qui tollis peccata mundi. 
Miserere, miserere nobis, 
Dona nobis pacem! 



(Translation) 

Lamb of God 

Lamb of God, 

Thou that takest away the world's guilt, 

O have compassion on us. 

May thy peace be with us. 



Les Abeilles 

Midi! tout I'azur vibre de lumiere; 
Dans la ruche active, au soleil d' ete 
Un bruit sourd grandit, monte, s'exaspere, 
Par d'innombrables ailes bourdonne. 

Et brusque un essaim de folles abeilles, 
Trouvant trop etroit I'odorant logis, 
S'en va, ruisselant de clartes vermeilles, 
Aux vergers lointains batir d'autres nids. 

Filles de ma ruche, aimables compagnes 
Au doux corselet d'or et de rayon, 
Dans votre fuite a travers les campagnes, 
Vous suivra I'esprit du vieux Palemon. 

Allez! butinez par les lourdes treilles, 
Les lauriers en fleurs, les rosiers grimpants 
Oubliez, helas! le pasteur d'abeilles 
Qui vous cherissait comme ses enfants. 



L'Oiseau Bleu 

II est un tout petit oiseau. 

Qui toujours vole. 

Plus leger que le passereau, 

Plus leger que !a brise folle, 

Veut on le saisir, il s'envole 

Le petit, tout petit, tout petit oiseau. 

II est un tout petit oiseau. 

Qui toujours chante, 

Frere cadet de I'etourneau, 

De sa chanson insouciante, 

II nous ravit tous et nous hante 

Le petit, tout petit, tout petit oiseau. 

II est un tout petit oiseau, 

Cheri du poete, 

Sa cage est une exquise tete. 

Son perchoir un gentil cerveau, 

Et tous les jours il fait la fete 

Le petit, tout petit, tout petit oiseau. 



"Depuis le jour" from ''Louise' 

Depuis le jour 

Oil je me suis donnee, 

Toute fleurie 

Semble ma destinee. 

Je crois rever 

Sous un ciel de feerie, 

L'ame encore grisee 

De tou premier baiser! 

Quelle belle vie! 

Mon reve n'etait pas un reve! 

Ah! Je suis heureuse! 

L'amour etend sur moi ses ailesl 

Au jardin de mon coeur 

Charte une joie nouvelle! 

Tout vibre. 

Tout se rejouit de mon triomphe! 

Autour de moi 

Tout est sourire, lumiere et joie! 

Et je tremble delicieusement 

Au souvenir charmant 

Du premier jour d'amour! 



(Translation) 

"E'er since the day" from "Louise' 

E'er since the day 

When unto thee I gave me, 

Radiant with flowers 

Seems my pathway before me. 

I seem to dream 

'Neath a fairyland heaven. 

While my soul still is drunk 

With the joy of the first kiss. 

Ah, how sweet is life! 

My dream has not been merely dreaming! 

Ah I I am so happy ! 

For love o'er me his wings is spreading! 

In the realm of my heart 

New is the joy that's singing! 

All nature doth rejoice with me, 

And wiih me triumph! 

And all aroimd 

I see but laughter and light and joy! 

And I tremble with exquisite delight 

When I recall the charm 

Of our first day of love! 




The Curtis Institute of Music 



CASIMIR HALL 
Sixth Season— 1929-1930 



Third Faculty Recital 



LYNNWOOD FARNAxM, Organisi 



V^ednesday Evening, December 4, 1929 



at 8.30 o'cloc\ 



The Steinway is the official piano of The Curtis Institute 0/ Music 



Bach Programme 

FANTASIA IN G major 

Tres vitement — Grave — Lentement 

Schweitzer says, regarding this piece: "The beautiful part-leading 
of the Grave might tend to raise a doubt as to whether it is really one 
of Bach's youthful works." 

The first movement is of a sprightly character, abounding in echo' 
effects, the Grave is a "noble monologue" (Harvey Grace) while the 
final movement is a cadenza leading to a majestic close. 

"MY HEART IS FILLED WITH LONGING" (Herzlich thut 
MICH verlangen) — Chorale Prelude 

"The possibilities of a brief statement of the tune, with very slight 
decoration, are well shown in this exquisite little piece. Its appeal 
depends on several factors — the perfect harmonization, the interest of 
the accompanying parts, and the broken utterance obviously evoked 
by the word 'verlangen'." — Harvey Grace. 

ALLEGRO AND LARGO from Fifth Trio Sonata 

Allegro: Exposition in C major — exposition inverted in key of 
dominant — development passing through subdominant and conclusion 
in main key — development of second idea in C major which leads to 
the first theme — re-exposition — inversion of second idea — re-exposition 
of first period exactly as at the beginning. 

Largo in A minor: Theme in soprano — answer in alto — develop- 
ment relative key in alto — answer in soprano — episode passing through 
subdominant — conclusion by rc-exposition of first period. 

The foregoing is the style of annotation adopted by Arthur W. 
Poister in his twenty programs presenting the complete organ works 
of Bach now in progress at the University of Redlands, California, 
from November 10, 1929, to February 19, 1930. 

The six Trio- Sonatas were probably written during Bach's first 
years in Leipzig, that is, between 1723 and 1727. Partaking of the 
character of chamber-music, they are invariably woven of three parts 
or "voices," and their first and last movements are sprightly and 
irresistibly rhythmical in effect. Bach's works are always notable for 
their economy of material. 



■'■■'■il'l ' !ll.-^ 



Bach Frogramme 

CHORALE AND EIGHT VARIATIONS in the form of Par- 
titas ON THE Chor.\le, "O Gott, du frommer Gott" (O 
God, Thou faithful God) — C minor 

Although several sets of "Partita" variations appear among the 
organ compositions of Bach, they are in a clear clavier (or pianoforte) 
style, the sparse pedal part (added by later editors) being in most 
cases a mere doubling of the bass played by the hand. They lend 
themselves wonderfully to the diversified registration possible on a 
modem organ. A study of the various sets reveals the invariable 
inclusion of a two-voice variation ostinato-wise with the treble in 
sprightly figuration, later one of a "celestial voices" character, then 
the final variation, briUiant and toccata-Hke or slow and rich. 

In the set on "O Gott, du frommer Gott," the first movement, a 
block-chord harmonization of the tune, is designated Partita I. and the 
variations are as follows: II. Allegro, two voices, basso ostinato (the 
same theme repeated successively), treble figuration; III. Three voices, 
moderato; IV. Allegro, treble figuration, pizzicato bass; V. Allegro, 
three voices, gossamer-light in feeling; VI. "Celestial voices," accom- 
panied by long leaps in the bass; VII. Allegretto, 3-4; VIII. Adagio, 
four voices, chromatic motive of suppHcation, one of Bach's choice 
inspirations; IX. Allegro, echo efi^ects and many changes of keyboard; 
at the end a pianistic broken-chord triplet passage which is unique 
among Bach's organ works. In all the variations the Chorale theme 
is in the soprano voice and all except Variation VII. are in four-four 
time. 

Harvey Grace remarks of this work that it shows in a marked 
degree the influence of Georg Bohm, who seems to have imbibed a 
good deal of the spirit of the French clavecin composers, and that 
no doubt much of the grace of Bach's early keyboard writing is due 
to French influences received thus at second hand. 

CONCERTO IN A minor 

Allegro — Adagio — Allegro 

A hearing of this concerto (originally composed for strings by 
Vivaldi) at a Philadelphia concert of the New York Philharmonic 
Orchestra under Mengelberg, November 7, 1927, aroused new inter- 
est in the work, by far the finest of the four concertos Bach trans- 
scribed for organ. 



(over) 



Bach Programme 

THREE CHORALE PRELUDES 

"WE ALL BELIEVE IN ONE TRUE GOD" (WiR glauben 
all' an einen Gott) — F major 
A five-voice setting of the Creed, with double pedal and the 
theme in the soprano. At the end there is a coloratura coda. 

''COMEST THOU NOW, JESUS, FROM HEAVEN TO 

EARTH?" (KoMMST du nun) Trio in G major, theme 

in 4 'ft pedal 

One of the ''Six Schiibler," issued 1747-49 by the pubHsher of 

that name. These six works are transcriptions of movements from 

cantatas, and were the first of Bach's compositions to be printed. 

"GOOD CHRISTIAN MEN REJOICE" (In Dulci Jubilo) 
A simple trio presentation of the old Christmas hymn. 

PRELUDE AND FUGUE in D major 

The Prelude and Fugue in D major is a popular and well-known 
composition in happy vein. Griepenkerl says the Prelude and the 
Fugue were usually regarded as separate works, but were found to- 
gether in a manuscript belonging to Nicolai. This seems to be the only 
authority for the association. 

The Fugue might very well stand alone, but the Prelude is in 
diff"erent case. After the briUiant first part there is an Adagio which 
clearly leads to something else, and which must stand between two 
brilliant movements to be effective. This Adagio is not in the character 
of bridge work. It seems more important than an episode. The grave 
and gloomy progress of the double pedal, the surprising clash of 
dissonance, and the harmonic color combine to assume the full measure 
of a separate slow movement. 

The Prelude is marked "concertante" in Griepenkerrs manuscript 
copy, which indicates that it was not intended for church use. It 
is, indeed, somewhat in the style and mood of the earlier French 
overture. 

Spitta calls the Fugue "da2;zling and brilliant," and other more 
conservative critics have found it "superb." There is a tendency now 
to rate the work lower, but it is highly suitable for concert purpose 
with its high spirits and its unflagging energy. It has the quality of 
a scherzo. — Henry Bellamann. 



The organ is an Aeolian 







The Curtis Institute of Music 



CASIMIR H.\LL 
SIXTH SEASON, 1929-1930 



Fourth Faculty Recital 



LEA LUBOSHUTZ, Violinisi 

Harry Kaufman at the Piano 



Thursday Evening, December Tivelfth 

at 8.30 o'cloc\ 



The Steix"3.-at is the official piano of The Curtis Ixstitute 0/ Mi s:c 



¥Ll 



l^ 



;^ 



Programme 



JOHANN Sebastian Bach Paxtita in E minor 

Prelude: Maestoso 
Adagio ma non troppo 
Allemande 
Gigue 

(Organ accompaniment played by Alexander McCurdy, Jr.) 



n. 

HOFMANN'LUBOSHUTZ (Allemande 

[ Gavotte 
PONCE'HeiFETZ Estrellita (Mexican Serenade) 

KreutzeR'Kaufman Caprice 

Frit2 Kreisler I Variations on a Theme by Corelli 

(Tambourin Chinois 



m. 

Jules Conus (Iloncerto in E minor 

Allegro molto — i\ndante espressivo — Allegro subito 



The organ is an Aeolian 



i 




The Curtis Institute of Music 



CASIMIR HALL 
SIXTH SEASON, 1929-1930 



Fifth Faculty Recital 



ISABELLE VEXGEROVA, PlanUt 
LEA LUBOSHUTZ, Violinist 

FELIX SALMOND, Violoncellist 



V\l ednesday Evening, January 8, 1930 

at 8.30 o'doc\ 



The Stein WAY is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 



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Programme 



Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart Trio in E major, Opus 15, No. 2, 

for Piano, Violin and Violoncello 
Allegro 

Andante grazioso 
Allegro 



LUDWIG VAN Beethoven Sonata in A major, Opus 47, 

for Piano and Violin (Kreutaer) 
Adagio sostenuto — Presto 
Andante con variasioni 
Finale: Presto 



Peter IlJITSCH TsCHAIKOWSKY Trio in A minor. Opus 50, for Piano, 

Violin and Violoncello 
(To the Memory of a Great Artist) 
I. Pezzo elegiaco 

II. (a) Tema con variazioni 

Andante con moto — Piu mosso — 
Allegro moderato — L'Istesso tempo — 
L'Istesso tempo — Tempo di Valse — 
Andante fiebile ma non tanto — 
Tempo di Mazurka — Moderato 

(b) Variazione finale e coda 

Allegro risoluto e con fuoco — 
Andante con moto — Lugubre 



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The Curtis Institute of Music 



CASIMIR HALL 
SIXTH SEASON, 19294930 



Sixth Faculty Recital 



HORATIO CONNELL, Baritone 

Rose Bampton, Contralto 

(Student of Mr. CkDNNELL) 

Collaborating 

Ellis Clark Hammann at the Piano 



V\/ednesday Evening, January 15 , 1930 

at 8.Z0 o'cloc\ 



The Ste:x\a-ay is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 



RECITAL OF SONGS AND DUETS BY 
JOHANNES BRAHMS 

Programme 



I. 



Minnelied 

Sonntag 

Verrath 

Auf dem Schiffe 

11. 

Vier ernste Gesange 

"Derm es gehet dem Menschen" 
"Ich wandte mich" 
"O Tod, wie bitter bist du" 
"Wenn ich mit Menschen" 

III. 

From "Zigeunerlieder" — 
"He! Zigeuner!" 
"Hochgethiirmte Rima-Fluth" 
"Wisst ihr wann mein Kindchen?" 
"Brauner Bursche" 
"Kommt dir manchmal in den Sinn?' 
"Roslein dreie" 

IV. 

Duette fiir Alt und Bariton — 
Die Nonne und der Ritter 
Vor der Thiir 
Es rauschet das Wasser 
Der Jager und sein Liebchen 



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Minnelied 

Holder klingt der Vogelsang, 

Wenn die Engelreine, 
Die mein Jiinglingsherz bezwang, 

Wandelt durch die Haine. 

Rother bluhen Thai und Au, 
Griiner wird der Rasen, 

Wo die Finger meiner Frau 
Maienblumen lasen. 

Ohne sie ist Alles todt, 

Welk sind Bliit' und Krauter; 
Und kein Friihlingsabendroth 

Dunkt mir schon und heiter. 

Traute, minnigliche Frau, 

Wollest nimmer fliehen, 
Dass mein Herz, gleich dieser Au, 

Mog in Wonne bliihen! 



( Translation) 

Love Song 

When the flowery meads among 
Roams my queen of beauty, 

Sweeter rings the linnet's song 
So to do her duty. 

Deeper flush the rosy bowers. 
Greener grow the grasses, 

Where, to cull the valley flowers. 
My sweet lady passes. 

She away, the world is dead. 
Grass and bud together. 

And for me no evening red 
Tells of fairer weather. 

Sweetest lady, kind and dear. 
Reign thou in my bosom, 

That my heart while thou art near 
Like the mead may blossom. 



Sonntag 

So hab' ich doch die ganze Woche mein feines 

Liebchen nicht geseh'n, 
Ich sah es an einem Sonntag wohl vor der 

Thiire steh'n: 
Das tausend schone Jungfraulein, 
Das tausend schone Herzelein, 
Wollte Gott, ich war' heute bei ihrl 

So will mir doch die ganze Woche das Lachen 

nicht vergeh'n, 
Ich sah es an einem Sonntag wohl in die Kirche 

geh'n. 
Das tausend schone Jungfraulein, 
Das tausend schone Herzelein, 
Wollte Gott, ich war' heute bei ihrl 



(Translaticm') 

Sunday 

Six weary days are past and over, since I my 

true love gaz'd on last. 
And that was upon a Sunday, by her dwelling 

as I pass'd: 
She stood before her cottage door, 
A thousand pretty looks she wore. 
Would to Heav'n, I were with her this day! 

Six pleasant days are past and over since a 

look on me she cast. 
And that was upon a Sunday in the church door 

as she pass'd; 
That look of hers I'll ne'er forget, 
A thousand times I think of it. 
Would to Heav'n I were with her this day. 



Verrath 

Ich stand in einer lauen Nacht 

An einer griinen Linde; 
Der Mond schien hell, der Wind ging sacht, 

Der Giessbach floss geschwinde. 

Die Linde stand vor Liebchen's Haus; 

Die Tiire hort' ich knarren. 
Mein Schatz Hess sacht ein Mannsbild 'raus: 

"Lass Morgen mich nicht barren; 
Lass mich nicht barren, susser Mann; 

Wie hab' ich dich so gerne! 
An's Fenster klopfe leise an, 

Mein Schatz ist in der Feme!" 

Lass ab von Druck und Kuss, Feinslieb, 

Du Schoner im Sammetkleide; 
Nun spute dich, du f einer Dieb: 

Ein Mann harrt auf der Haide! 

Der Mond scheint hell, der Rasen griin 

Ist gut zu uns'rem Begegnen; 
Du tragst ein Schwert und nickst so kiihn, 

Dein' Liebschaft will ich segnen! 
Und als erschien der lichte Tag, 

Was fand er auf der Haide? 
Ein Todter in den Blumen lag, 

Zu einer Falschen Leide. 



(Translation') 

Treachery 

I stood upon a summer's night 

There, where the linden's growing; 

The moon shone clear, the winds were light. 
The torrent swiftly flowing. 

The linden near my love's house grew; 

I heard the door soft grating. 
My dear a man let softly through; 

"Don't, Morning, keep me waiting: 
Don't keep me waiting, darling, pray; 

I love thee as the day, dear!" 
Then op'd the lattice soft to say: 

"My true love's far away, dear!" 

Have done caress and kiss, heart's lief. 

And wooer in scarlet feather; 
Now hasten thee, thou dainty thief, 

A man waits on the heather. 

The moon shines clear, the grass so green 

Is good too for our meeting; 
Thou bear'st a sword and nod so keen. 

Thine amour has my greeting! 
And on the heath, the light of day. 

What found it on the morrow? 
A corse among the flowers lay, 

All to a false maid's sorrow. 



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Auf dem Schiffe 

Ein Vogelein fliegt iiber der^ Rhein 

Und wiegt die Fliigel im Sonneuschein 

Sieht Rebenhtigel und grune Flut 

In gold'ner Glut; 

Wie wohl das thut, 

So hoch erhoben im Morg'enhauch ! 

Bei'm Voglein droben, o war, ich auch. 



(Translatimi) 

Aboard a Boat 

A birdling flew far over the Rhine, 

And waved his wings in the glad sunshine. 

Saw vine clad mountains, and rivers' flow 

In golden glow, 

Such joy to know, 

Uplift so high on breath of mom! 

Dear bird that I might be borne. 



Denn es gehet dem Menschen 

Denn es gehet dem Menschen, wie dem Vieh; 

wie dies stirbt, so stirbt er auch; 
Und haben alle einerlei Odem, und der Mensch 

hat nichts mehr, denn das Vieh; 
Denn es ist alles eitel. 
Es fahrt alles an einen Ort; es ist alles von 

Staub gemacht, 
Und wird wieder zu Staub. 
Wer weiss, ob der Geist des Menschen aufwarts 

fahre, 
Und der Odem des Viehes unterwarts unter die 

Erde fahre? 
Darum sehe ich, dass nichts bessers ist, denn 

dass der Mensch frohlich sei in seiner 

Arbeit; 
Denn das ist sein Theil. 
Denn wer will ihn dahin bringen, dass er sehe, 

was nach ihm geschehen wird? 



(Translation) 

Ecclesiastes III 

v. 19. One thing befalleth the beasts and the 
sons of men; the beast must die, the man dieth 
also, yea, both must die; to beast and man one 
breath is given, and the man is not above the 
beast; for all things are but vanity. 

V. 20. They go all to one place; for they all 
are of the dust, and to dust they return. 

z'. 21. WTio laioweth if a man's spirit goeth 
upwards ? And who knoweth if the spirit of the 
beast goeth downward to the earth? 

I'. 22. Therefore, I perceive there is no bet- 
ter thing than for a man to rejoice in his own 
works, for that is his portion. For w^ho shall 
ever show him what will happen after him? 



Ich wandte mich 

Ich wandte mich und sah an alle, die Unrecht 

leiden unter der Sonne; 
Und siehe, da waren Thranen, derer, die 

Unrecht litten, und batten keinen Troster, 
Und die ihnen Unrecht thaten, waxen zu mach- 

tig, dass sie keinen Troster haben konnten. 

Da lobte ich die Todten, die schon gestorben 
waren, mehr als die Lebendigen, 

Die noch das Leben batten; Und der noch nicht 
ist, ist besser als alle Beide, 

Und des Bosen nicht inne wird, das unter der 
Sonne geschieht. 



(Translation) 

Ecclesiastes IV 

V. 1. So I returned, and did consider all the 
oppressions done beneath the sun; and there was 
weeping and wailing from those that were op- 
pressed and had no comfort; for with their op- 
pressors there was power, so that no one came 
to comfort them. 

V. 2. Then did I praise the dead, which are 
already dead; yea, more than the living, which 
linger still in life; 

r. 3. Yea, he that is not is better than dead 
or living, for he doth not know of the evil, that 
is wrought for ever on earth. 



"O Tod, wie bitter bist du" 

O Tod, wie bitter bist du, wenn an dich ge- 
denket ein Mensch, der gute Tage und genug 
hat und ohne Sorge lebet; und dem es wohl 
geht in alien Dingen und noch wohl essen mag! 
O Tod, wie wohl thust du dem Diirftigen, der 
da schwach und alt ist, der in alien Sorgen 
steckt, und nichts Bessers zu hoffen, noch zu 
erwarten hat! 



(Translation) 

Ecclesiastes XLI 

V. 1. O Death, how bitter, how bitter art 
thou unto him that dwelleth in peace, to him 
that hath joy in his possessions, and liveth free 
from trouble, to him whose vi^ays are prosperous 
in all things, to him that still may eat! 

-'. 2. O Death, how welcome art thou to him 
that is in want and whose strength doth fail 
him, and whose life is but a pain, who hath 
nothing to hope for, and cannot look for relief! 



"Wenn ich mit Menschen und mit 
Engels2;ungen" 

Wenn ich mit Menschen und mit Engelszun- 
gen redete, und hatte der Liebe nicht, so war 
ich ein tonend Erz, oder eine klingende Schelle. 
Und wenn ich weissagen konnte und wiisste alle 
Geheimnisse und alle Erkenntniss, und hatte 
alien Glauben, also, dass ich Berge versetzte; 
und hatte der Liebe nicht, so ware ich nichts. 
Und wenn ich alle meine Habe den Armen gabe, 
und Hesse meinen Leib brennen; und hatte der 
Liebe nicht, so ware mir's nichts niitz'e. Wir 
sehen jetzt durch einen Spiegel in einem dun- 
keln Orte, dann aber von Angesicht zu Ange- 
sichte. Jetzt erkenne ich's stiickweise, dann aber 
werd ich's erkennen, gleichwie ich erkennet bin. 
Nun aber bleibet Glaube, Hoffnung, Liebe, diese 
drei; aber die Liebe ist die grosseste unter 
ihnen. 



"He! Zigeuner!" 



He, Zigeuner, greife in die Seiten ein! 
Spiel das Lied vom ungetreuen Magdelein! 
Lass die Saiten weinen, klagen, traurig bange, 
Bis die heisse Thrane netzet diese Wangel 



(Translation") 

I Corinthians XIII 

Though I speak with the tongues of men and 
of angels, and have not charity, then I am be- 
come as a sounding brass, or a tinkling cymbal. 
And though I can prophesy, and understand all 
mysteries, and am powerful in knowledge, and 
though I have the gift of faith and can move 
the mountains, and have not charity, yet am I 
nothing worth. And though I give my worldly 
goods to feed the poor and though I give my 
body to be burned, and have not charity, it 
profiteth me nothing. For now we see the Word 
darkly as through a glass, but then we shall see 
it face to face. Here I know but partly, but 
there I surely shall know it, even as I am also 
known. Now abideth faith and hope and char- 
ity, these three, but the greatest of these is 
charity. 

iTranslation) 

"Ho! Gypsy!" 

Ho, there, Gypsy 1 Strike, resounding ev'ry 

string. 
And the song of false and faithless maiden 

sing! 
Let the strings all moan, lamenting, sorrow, 

weeping. 
Till the burning tears these cheeks so hot 

are steeping! 



Hochgethurmte Rima'Fluth 

Hochgethiirmte Rima-Fluth, wie bist du so trtib', 
An dem Ufer klag' ich laut nach dir, mein Lieb! 
Wellen fiiehen, Wellen stromen, rauschen an 

den Strand heran zu mir, 
An dem Rima-Ufer lasst mich ewig weinen nach 

ihr! 



(Translation) 

"High and Towering Rima-stream" 

High and towering Rima-stream, 

How art thou so drear! 
On thy shore I mourn aloud 

For thee, my dear! 

Waves are rushing, waves are flying. 
Rolling o'er the strand afar to me; 

On the shore of Rima let me 
Weep for her eternally! 



"Wisst ihr, wann mein Kindchen?" 

Wisst ihr, wann mein Kindchen am allerschon- 

sten ist? 
Wenn ihr siisses Miindchen scherzt und lacht 

und kiisst. 
Magdelein, du bist mein, inniglich kiiss' ich dich, 
Dich er=;chuf der liebe Himmel einzig nur fiir 

mich! 

Wisst ihr, wann mein Kindchen am besten mir 

gefiel ? 
Wenn in meinen Armen ich es umschlungen 

hielt. 
Schiitzelein, du bist mein, inniglich kuss' ich 

dich, 
Dich erschuf der liebe Himmel einzig nur fiir 

mich! 



(Translation) 

"Knov/ Ye When My Loved One" 

Know ye when my lov'd one is fairest of all 

bliss? 
If her sweet mouth rosy, jest and laugh and 

kiss. 
Maiden heart, mine thou art; tenderly I kiss 

thee — - 
Thee a loving heaven made alone and but for 

me! 

Know ye when my lov'd one the dearest is to 

me? 
When in my fond arms I enfold her lovingly. 
Maiden heart, mine thou art; tenderly I kiss 

thee — 
Thee a loving heaven made alone and but for 

me! 



"Brauner Bursche" 

Brauner Bursche fiihrt zum Tanze sein blauau- 

gig schones Kind, 
Schlajrt die Sporen keck zusammen. Czardas 

Melodie beginnt, 
Kiisst und herzt sein susses Taubschen, dreht 

sie, fiihrt sie, jauchzt und springt; 
Wirft drei blanke Silbergulden auf das Cimbal, 

dass es klingt. 



( Translation) 

"Sun'brown Lad" 

Sun-brown lad to dance is leading 
His blue-eyed and pretty lass. 
Strikes the clashing spurs together. 
To the melody Czardas; 
Kisses fondly his sweet dove. 
And spinning, whirling, shouts and 

springs! 
Throws three shining silver gulden 
That upon the cymbal ring. 



"Kommt Dir manchmal" 

Kommt dir manchmal in den Sinn, mein siisses 

Lieb, 
Was du einst mit heirgem Eide mir gelobt 
Tausch mich nicht, verlass mich nicht, 
Du weisst nicht, wie lieb ich dich hab', 
Lieb' du mich wie ich dich, 
Dann stromt Gottes Huld auf dich herabl 



{Translation) 

"Art Thou Thinking" 

Art thou thinking often now, sweetheart, my 

love. 
What thou once with holy vow to me hast 

sworn? 
Trifle not, forsake me not, 
Thou know'st not how dearly I love thee; 
Lov'st thou me as I love thee. 
Smile of God shall crown thee graciously. 



"Roslein dreie" 

Roslein dreie in der Reihe bliih'n so rot, 

Dass der Bursch zum Madel geht ist kein Ver- 

bot ! 
Lieber Gott, wenn das verboten war', 
Stiind' die schone, weite Welt schon langst nicht 

mehr. 
Ledig bleiben Siinde war! 

Schonstes Stadtchen in Alfold ist Ketschkemet, 
Dort giebt es gar viele Madchen schrauck und 

nett! 
Freunde, sucht euch dort ein Brautchen aus, 
Freit um ihre Hand und griindet euer Haus, 
Freudenbecher leeret aus! 



(Translaticni) 

"Rose-buds Three" 

Rosebuds three, all on one tree, ye bloom so 

red; 
That lad a lassie woo is not forbid! 
Loving God, if that had been denied. 
All the world the beauteous world, had long 

since died, 
Single life's a sin beside! 

Fairest village in Alfeld is Ketschkemet, 
There live many pretty lasses, trim and neat! 
Comrades seek and choose ye there a bride; 
Sue, then, for her hand, and may your house a 

bide. 
Drain the goblet, comrades tried! 



Die Nonne und der Ritter 

Alt 

Da die Welt zur Ruh' gegangen, wacht mit 

Sternen mein Verlangen, 
In der Kiihle muss ich lauschen, wie die Wellen 

unten rauschen! 
Bariton 
Fernher mich die Wellen tragen, die an's Land 

so traurig schlagen, 
Unter deines Fensters Gitter, Fraue, kennst du 

noch den Ritter? 
Alt 
Ist's doch, als ob seltsam' Stimmen durch die 

lauen Liifte schwimmen; 
Wieder hat's der Wind genommen, Ach, mein 

Herz ist so beklommen! 
Bariton 
Druben liegt dein Schloss verfallen, klagend in 

den oden Hallen, 
Aus dem Grund der Wald mich griisste, 
Alt und Bariton 

'S war, als ob ich sterben miisste. 
Alte Klange bliihend schreiten 
Wie aus lang versunknen Zeiten, 
Will mich Wehmuth noch bescheinen, und ich 

mocht' von Herzen weinen. 
Bariton 
Ober'm Walde blitzt's vom Weiten, wo um, 

Christi Grab sie streiten; 
Alt und Bariton 
Dorthin wUl mein Schiff ich wenden. Da wird 

Alles, Alles enden ! 
Geht ein Schiff, ein Mann stand drinnen, falsche 

Nacht, verwirrst die Sinne! 
Alt 
Welt, Ade! Gott woll' bewahren, die noch irr' 

im Dunkeln fahren! 



(JTransIation) 

The Nun and the Knight 



Alto 



Now the world is wrapt in slumber, 
Glit'ring stars, in countless number. 
Seem to watch my lone repining, 
Here, with ocean's voice combining! 

Baritone 

From afar the waves have brought me. 
From afar thy knight has sought thee; 
'Neath thy lattice canst thou hear me? 
Dost thou know thy knight is near thee? 

Alto 

What strange soimd of voices singing. 
Thru the sultry air is ringing? 
Now the wind that sound is taking, 
Oh! my weary heart is breaking! 

Baritone 

There thy castle bleak and lonely, 

Peopled now by spirits only. 

Mocks my sight with mournful greeting, 

Alto and Baritone 

Life itself seems swiftly fleeting! 
Songs of days long departed, 

Alto 

By some chord of mem'ry started, 
Tho they come with all their gladness. 
Fill my heart with naught but sadness. 

Baritone 

Visions rise of battle raging. 
Where the Holy War is waging. 
There my way will soon be wended, 

Alto and Baritone 

There my life will soon be ended. 
Ah! that ship! 'Tis his now leaving. 
Or the gloom mine eyes deceiving! 
World, farewell! O God, watch o'er him! 
Naught but darkness lies before him! 



Vor der Thiir 

Bariton 

Tritt auf den Riegel von der Thiir, wie gern 

kam ich herein, um dich zu kussen. 
Alt 
Ich lass' dich nicht herein, schleich immer heim 

ganz sacht, auf deinen Fiissen. 
Bariton und Alt 
Wohl kann ich schleichen, sacht wie Monden- 

schein 
Ich lass dich nicht herein, schleich immer heim 

ganz sacht. 
Steh' nur auf, lass mich ein. 
Bariton. 
Das will ich von dir haben, O Magdlein, dein'n 

Knaben lass' ein. 
Alt iind Bariton 
Tritt auf den Riegel von der Thiir, steh' auf 

und lass' niic'a ein, 
Ich la;s dich nicht herein, schleich immer heim 

ganz sacht, ich lass' dich nicht ein. 
Das will ich von dir haben O Magdlein, dein'n 

Knaben lass' ein. 



(Translatimt) 

The Coquette and Her Lover 

Baritone 

Sweet maid! I'm waiting at the door, all's well 

prepar'd, haste! I do implore. 
This ring shall make thee mine! For ever more 

I'll ne'er forsake thee. 
Alto 
To wed so soon, I'm not at all inclin'd. In fact, 

I've changed my mind. 
So pray go home, as fast as thy long legs can 

take thee. 
Baritone 

No! cruel maiden, here will I remain. 
Alto 

'Tis useless quite, you'd best go home again. 
Baritone and Alto 
Nay, come down, I implore! 
Oh! pray, go home again, you'd best go home. 
Then all thy vows are broken! Oh! false one! 

Oh! fair one! Come down, I implore I 



Es rauschet das Wasser 

Alt 

Es rauschet das Wasser und bleibet nich steh'n; 
Gar lustig die Sterne am Himmel hingeh'n; 
Gar lustig die Wolken am Himmel hinzieh'n. 
So rauschet die Liebe und fahret dahin. 
Bariton 

Es rauschet das Wasser und bleibet nich steh'n; 
Doch bleiben die Sterne, sie wandeln und gehn. 
So auch mit Der Liebe, der treuen geschieht, 
Sie wegt sich, sie regt sich, imd andert sich 
nicht. 



(Translation) 

The Streamlet Flows Onwards 

Alto 

The streamlet flows onwards and ne'er standeth 

still. 
The stars in the Heavens their courses fulfil. 
The clouds travel swiftly across the blue sky. 
Thus love journeys onward thru life till we die. 
Baritone 
The streamlet may dwindle, the clouds melt 

away. 
The stars at the last will be bright as today. 
And so will be ever the light of true love. 
As pure and as bright, as those planets above! 



Der Jager und sein Liebchen 

Bariton 

Ist auch der Himmel so blau, 
Steh' am Fenster und schau! 
Erst in der Nacht, spat in der Nacht, 
Komm' ich heim von der Jagd! 

Alt 

Anders hab' ich gedacht, 

Tanzen will ich die Nacht! 

Bleib' vor der Thiir, spat vor der Thiir, 

Willst du nicht tanzen mit mir! 

Bariton nnd Alt 

Tst auch der Himmel so blau, 
Miidchen, der Himmel ist blau, 
Steh' ich doch nimmer und schau, 
Uleib' am Fenster und schau, 
Ob in der Nacht, spat in der Nacht 
Bis in der Nacht, spat in der Nacht, 
Heim du kehrst von der Jagd, 
Heim ich kehr' von der Jagd. 
Steh' ich doch nicht und schau! 
Bleib' am Fenster und schau! 



{Trarislation) 

The Huntsman and His Sweetheart 

Baritone 

Blue are the Heavens I trow! 

Now love a hunting I go. 

Let thine eyes bright first meet my sight. 
At thy window tonight! 

Alto 

Go not bunting tonight! 

Dancing is my delight. 

Dancing with thee, bless'd should I be. 

Stay then and dance, love, with me! 

Alto and Baritone 

Nay! if a hunting you go. 

Maiden you love me I know! 

I'll ne'er await you I trow. 

Say then you will let me go! 

Naught that is bright, shall meet thy sight. 

Let the lovelight from thine eyes bright. 

Coming home, love, tonight! I'll ne'er await 
thee. 

Guide me home, love, tonight; stay at thy win- 
dow tonight. 




The Curtis Institute of Music 



CASIMIR HALL 
SIXTH SEASON, 1929-1930 



Seventh Faculty Recital 



FELIX SALMOND, Violoncellisf 

HARRY KAUFMAN. Pianist 
Collaborating 



Vslednesday Evening, 'March Twelfth 



at 8.30 o'cloc\ 



g llllllllllMllliTmTr- 



The Steinwat is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 

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Programme 



I. 

George Frederic Handel Sonata, No. i, in G minor, for 

Violoncello and Piano 
Grave 
Allegro 

Sarabanda: Largo 
Allegro 



II. 

Jean HuRE Sonata, No. l, in F sharp minor, for 

Violoncello and Piano 
(in one movement) 



III. 

Maurice Ravel Piece en forme de Habanera 

Gabriel Faure Berceuse 

GrANAD0S'CaSSAD6 Intermezzo from the Opera "Goyescas" 



IV. 

Johannes Brahms Sonata in F major. Opus 99, for 

Violoncello and Piano 
Allegro vivace 
Adagio affettuoso 
Allegro passionato 
Allegro molto 



I 




The Curtis Institute of Music 

CASIMIR YiALL 
SIXTH SEASON, 1929-1930 



Eighth Faculty Recital 



ANTON TORELLO, DouUe Bass 

Harry }L\ufman at the Piano 



tAonday Evening, March Seventeenth 

at 8.30 o'cioc\ 



The Stein-u-at is the official piano of The Cl-rtis Ixstitvte of Mvsic 



j^ 



Programme 
I. 

JeaN'Baptiste Loeillet Sonata 

Largo 
Allemande 
Gavotte 
Gigue 



n. 

Pedro Valls Fantasy 

III. 

Henri Eccles Grave 

Pedro Valls El Canto de la Vieja 

Serge Koussevitzky Chanson Triste 

Pedro Valls Gavotte 

Anton Torello Polka Caprice 




The Curtis Institute of Music 

CASIMIR HALL 

SIXTH SEASON, 1929-1930 



Ninth Faculty Recital 



3IR. JOSEF H0F3LAXX, Pianist 



Wednesday' Evening, 'March 19, 1930 

at S.2>0 o'c\oc\ 



The Stein-way is the official piano of The Cl-rtis Institute of Mcsic 



Programme 



I. 

Felix Mendelssohn Prelude and Fugue in E minor, Opus 3 5 

Beethoven — Saint-Saens Choir of the Dervishes 

Robert Schumann Faschingsschwank aus Wien, Opus 26 

Allegro 

Romanze 

Scherzino 

Intermezzo 

Finale 



FRfo^Ric Chopin , 



II. 

1 Impromptu in G flat major. Opus 51 
Nocturne in F minor, Opus 55, No. 1 
'Sonata in B minor. Opus 58 

Allegro maestoso 

Scherzo: Molto vivace 

Largo 

Finale: Presto non tanto 



III. 

Sergei Rachmaninov /prelude in G sharp minor 

(Prelude in A minor 

Anatole Ll\dov Music Box 

Fr.^nz Liszt Mephisto Valse 



Mr. Hopmann uses the Steinway Piano 



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The Curtis Institute of Music 



CASIMIR nALL 
SIXTH SEASON, 1929-1930 



Tenth Faculty Recital 



I^lR. EFREM ZIMBALIST, Violinist 

Mr. Harry Kaufman at the Piano 



V\lednesday Evening, March. Twenty-sixth 

at 8.30 o'cloc\ 



The Steinway is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Ml-sic 



i 



Programme 



* 



I. 

Johannes Brahms Sonata, No. 3, in D minor. Opus los, for 

Violin and Piano 
Allegro 
Adagio 

Un poco presto e con sentimento 
Presto agitato 



II. 

Frederick A. Stock , Concerto in D minor 

Molto moderato 
Adagio: Molto tranquillo 
Finale: Allegro ma non troppo 

in. 

Karol Szy\l\no\\'SKI Tarantella 

C. YaIvL^a Kuruka-Kuruka 

Josef Suk Burleska 

BlZET'S.\R.ASATE "CaiTlien'" — Fantaisie de Concert 



I 




The Curtis Institute of Music 



CASIMIR HALL 
Sixth Season— 19294930 



Eleventh Faculty Recital 



MR. EMILIO DE GOGORZA, Bariione 

Miss Helen Winslow, at the Piano 



Wednesday/ Evening, April 2, 1930 

at 8.2>0 odoc\ 



The Steinway is the oflScial piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 



Programme 
I. 

Christoph Willibald Gluck "Recitatif et Air de Thoas" from 

"Iphigenie en Tauride" 
(1779) 

Pierre Monsigny "Air de Montauciel" from "Le Deserteur" 

(1769) 

II. 

Hector Berlioz From "La Damnation de Faust" 

Voici des Roses 
Serenade 

III. 

( Au Cimetiere 
Gabriel Faure ^ Lydia 

( Fleur Jetee 

IV. 

Emile Paladilhe Su2;anne 

Jules Massenet. . ."Promesse de mon Avenir" from "Le Roi de Lahore" 

V. 

(Ballade 

Claude Debussy ^Chevaux de Bois 

(Voici que le Printemps 

VI. 

!La Maja Dolorosa, No. 1* 
Cancion del Postilion 
El tra la la y el punteado 



* Arranged for Mr. de Gogorza by Mr. Granados 



"Recitatif et Air de Thoas" 

dans "Iphigenie en Tauride" 

Le ciel par d'eclatants miracles, 

A daigne s'expliquer i vous. 

Mes jours sont menaces par la voix des 

oracles, 
Si d'un seul stranger, relegu^ parmi nous, 
Le sang 6chappe Sl leur courroux. 
De noirs pressentiments mon ame intimidOe. 
De sinistres terreurs, est sans cesse obsedee. 
Le jour blesse mes yeux et semble s'obscurcir, 
J'^prouve I'effroi des coupables; 
Je crois voir sous mes pas la terre s'en- 

tr'ouvrir, 
Et I'enfer pr^t k m'engloutir, 
Dans ces abimes effroyables, 
Dans ces abimea effroyables. 

Je ne sais quelle voix crie au fond de mon 

coeur; 
Tremble ton supplice s'apprSte! 
La nuit de ces tourments redouble encor 

I'horreurl 
Et les foudres d'un dieu vengeur, 
Semblent suspendus sur ma tete. 



(Translation) 

(Recitative) 

The gods have foreshown me the future by a 

sign, that appeared at night; 
My life will be in danger, so the gods have 

foretold me, 
If but one of the strangers that here may be 

found, 
A single one escape their wrath. 

(Aria) 

Foreboding fears of ill, my wonted courage 

vanquished; 
In my bosom there lingers a strange haunting 

anguish. 
For me shines not the sun, around seems 

nought but death. 
The fears of the guilty are on me. 
Shall then death be my lot? How frightful 

is the thought! 
Earth for me gapes, earth for me gapes, 
See how it widens to engulf me! 
Hark! A voice full of awe fills the depths of 

my soul; 
"Tremble, righteous heav'n taketh vengeance!" 
The darkness of the night increases all my 

fear. 
See what spirits around me throng! 
Thunderbolts are near to destroy me I 



"Air de Montauciel" dans "Le 
Deserteur" 

Je ne dSserterai jamais — jamais 

Que pour aller boire, k longs traits 

De I'eau du fleuve oil Ton perd la mfmoire. 

II est permis d'etre parfois 

Infid&le k son inhumaine; 

Mais c'est blesser toutesles lois. 

Que de I'Otre 3. son capitaine. 



(Translaftan) 

Montauciel's Air From "The 
Deserter" 

The role of this pre-Revolutionary soldier, 
good fellow and true friend of the jolly bottle, 
was written for o type of voice difficult to 
classify, and for a purpose that no longer has 
an equivalent in the modern theatre. To the 
members of the Philippe group and later to 
those of the Moreau-Sainte clan, voices of par- 
tially baritone and partially tenor range, were 
entrusted these roles which required a warm 
diction rather than unlimited vocal resources, 
and a real singing ability. The following aria, 
in order to produce the proper effect, depends 
largely on the martial spirit and good humor 
of the interpreter. 
Never, never will I desert 
Except to drink, to drink in long draughts 
Water from the river where you lose your 

memory. 
It is permitted at times 
To be untrue to your better half; 
But it is an unpardonable crime 
To be untrue to your captain. 



From "La Damnation de Faust" 
Void des Roses 

Voici des roses, 

De cette nuit ^closes 

Sur ce lit embaume, 

O mon Faust bien aim6, 

Repose ! 

Dans un voluptueux sommeil 

Oa glissera sur toi plus d'un baiser vermeil, 

Oil des fleurs pour ta couche ouvriront leurs 

corolles. 
Ton oreille entendra de divines paroles, 
Ecoute, f coute I 

Les esprits de la terra et de I'air 
Commencent pour ton rSve, un suave concert. 



(Translation) 

From "The Damnation of Faust" 
Here are Roses 

Here are roses 

That have blossomed during the night. 

On this enchanted bed, 

O my beloved Faust, 

Repose! 

In a voluptuous sleep. 

During which many a Vermillion kiss will gre< 

you, 
During which flowers will open their corols. 
Your ear will hear divine words. 
Listen, listen ! 

The spirits of earth and air 
Begin a soft concert. 
To accompany your dream. 



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Serenade 

Maintenant, chantons a cette belle une chan- 
son morale, Pour la perdre plus sflrement. 

Devant la maison de celui qui t'adore, 

De celui, de celui qui t'adore 

Petite Louison, que fais-tu des I'aurore 

Que fais-tu? Que fais-tu? Que fais-tw? 

Au signal du plaisir, dans la chambre du drille, 

Tu peux bien entrer fille, 

Mais non fille en sortir. 

II te tend les bras, pr6s de lui tu cours vite, 

Tu cours pres de lui, pri'S de lui tu cours vite, 

Bonne nuit, bfilas; ma petite. 

Bonne nuit, bonne nuit, bonne nuit, bonne nuit, 

Prf^s du moment fatal, fais grande resistance, 

S'il ne t'offre d'avance, 

S'il ne t'offre un anneau conjugal. 






(Translation) 
Now, let us sing to this maiden, a moral 
song, for her certain damnation. 

Why, fair maid, wilt thou loiter, when daylight 

is done. 
In the shade by the door of thy lover? 
Though the darkness thy blushes may cover. 
Have a care I Have a care, and be gonel 
Though to enter were sweet, now that love's 

torch is burning. 
Not so sweet the returning. 
The cold, cruel world to greet. 
When he opens his arms in the ardor of love. 
Then, sweet maiden, I pray, do not linger, 
Make him first place the ring on thy finger, 
And his honour and constancy prove. 
Heed this one thing, would you 'scape your un- 
doing. 
Quench the fire of his wooing. 
With a "First, if it please you, the ring." 



Au cimetiere 

Heureux qui meurt ici, 

Ainsi que les oiseaux des champs 1 

Son corps, prSs des amis. 

Est mis dans I'herbe, et dans les chants 

II dort d'un bon sommeil vermeil, 

Sous le ciel radieux. 

Tous ceux qu'il a connus, sont venus, 

Lui font de longs adieux. 

A sa croix les parents pleurants, 

Restent agenouilles, 

Et ses OS, sous les fleurs, de pleurs 

Sont doucement mouillfis. 

Chacun sur le bois noir, 

Pent voir s'il etait jeune ou non. 

Et peut, avec de vrais regrets, 

L'appeler par son nom. 

Combien plus malchanceux sont ceux qui meu- 

rent Sl la mer, 
Et sous le flot profond 
S'en vont loin du pays aimo! 
Ah! pauvres! qui pour seuls linceuls 
Ont les goemons verts, oQ Ton roule inconnu, 

tout nu 
Et les yeux grands ouverts! 

Heureux qui meurt ici 

Ainsi que les oiseaux des champs! 

Son corps, prfs des amis. 

Est mis dans I'herbe et dans les chants 

II dort d'un bon sommeil vermeil. 

Sous le ciel radieux. 

Tous ceux qu'il a connus, sont venus, 

Lui font de longs adieux. 



(Translation) 

At the Cemetery 

Happy he who dies here. 
Even as the birds of the fields. 
His body, surrounded by friends, 
Is buried in grass and song. 

He sleeps a lovely sleep 
Under the radiant sky. 
People whom he has known come 
To bid him a long adieu. 

And at his cross bis weeping loved ones 
Remain kneeling. 

And his remains, under the flowers, by tears 
Are softly moistened. 

All can see on the black wood 
If he was young or old, 
And can, with true regrets. 
Call him by his name. 

Many times more unlucky they 

Who die at sea, 

And under the deep waves 

Journey far from their beloved country. 

Ah! poor ones! who for shrouds 
Have naught but the green sea weed. 
And move on unknown, nude. 
Lifeless eyes wide open. 

Happy he who dies here, 
Even as the birds of the fields. 
His body, surrounded by friends. 
Is buried in grass and song. 

He sleeps a lovely sleep 
Under the radiant sky. 
People whom he has known come 
To bid him a long adieu. 



Lydia 



Lydia sur tes roses joues 
Et sur ton col frais et si blanc, 
Roule ^tincelant 
L'or fluide que tu denoues, 
Le jour qui lui est le meilleur, 
Oublions I't'ternelle tombe, 
Laisse tes baisers, tes baisers de colombe 
Chanter sur ta levre en fleur, sur ta levre en 
fleur. 

Un lys cache repand sans cesse 

Une odeur divine en ton sein; 

Les delices comme un essaim 

Sortent de toi, jeune dt'esse 

Je t'aime et meurs, 6 mes amours 

Mon ame en baisers m'est ravie 

O Lydia, rends-moi la vie. 

Que je puisse mourir, mourir toujours. 



(Translation) 

Lydia 

Lydia, on your rosy cheeks. 
And on your neck so soft and white, 
Rolls and sparkles 
The flowing gold that you unravel. 
On this day of ecstasy. 
Let us forget the inevitable tomb. 
And let your kisses, your dove-like kisses 
Burst in song upon your lips and blossom as a 
flower. 

A hidden lily spreads a divine odor within your 

bosom, 
And delights, like bees from a hive, 
Are exhaled by you, my goddess. 
I love you and I die, O my love. 
Kisses have stolen my soul from within me. 
O Lydia, return me my life. 
So that I may die 
An eternal death. 



Reur jetee 



Emporte ma folie au gre du vent, 

Fleur en chantant cueillie 

Et jetee en revant! 

Emporte ma folie au gr6 du vent. 

Comme la fleur fauchee p6rit I'amour 
La main qui t'a touch4e fuit ma main sans 
retour. 

Que le vent qui te s^che, pauvre fleur, 

Tout a I'heure si fraiche 

Et demain sans couleur. 

Que le vent qui te seche, 6 pauvre fleur 

Que le vent qui te seche, sfche mon coeur! 



(Translation) 

Discarded Flower 

May my foUies be carried away at the will of 

the wind, 
Flower plucked in song. 
And discarded in dreams! 
May my follies be carried away at the will of 

the wind. 
Love perishes like the plucked flower. 
The hand that touched you flees my hand. 
Love perishes like the plucked flower. 
The hand that touched you flees my hand. 
May the wind that dries you, O my poor 

flower, 
A moment ago so fresh 
And tomorrow withered. 
Dry my broken heart. 



Suzanne 

Comme un petit oiseau pose sur le cherain. 

Qui devant vous chante et sautille, 

Je voyais une jeune fille. 

Marcher coquettement. 

Marcher coquettement. 

Son panier & la main. 

Comme un petit oiseau pos§ sur le chemin; 

La taille ^tait jolie, 

Le pied semblait mignon. 

(Seul, en vo>'age, que fait-on 

Si Ton ne regarde on s'ennuie) 

Aux buissons de la route. 

En allongeant le bras, 

Elle cueillait des roses, 

Perdait du temps a ces petites pauses. 

Moi, qui n'en perdais pas, 

Je la rejoins et je m'arrete, 

De mon cSte soudain, elle tourne le tete, 

Rien de plus gracieux n'avait encor frappe mes 

yeux. 
Quel frais visage et quel charmant sourire! 
Sans trouver 3. lui dire le moindre petit mot. 
Je la salue et passe, comme un sot, 
Elle avait vu mon trouble, 
Et je I'entendais rire, 
De qui? de moi c'etait justice enfin; 
Comme un petit oiseau pos& sur le chemin, 
Qui devant vous chante et sautille, 
Je vois tcujours le jeune fille. 
Marcher coquettement, 
Marcher coquettement. 
Son panier a la main, 

Comme un petit oiseau pose sur le chemin. 
Ah! qu'elle ftait jolie! 
Je I'ai vue un instant. 
Et pourtant et pourtant, 
Je ne crois pas que jamais je roublie! 
Je ne crois pas que jamais je I'oublie! 



(Translation) 

Suzanne 

Like a little bird lighted on the road. 
That sings and hops before you, 
I saw a maiden 

Walking coquettishly. 

Walking coquettishly, 
Her basket in her hand. 

Like a little bird lighted on the road, she was, 
Her form was charming — 
Her foot seemed dainty — 
(Alone and on a journey, what does one do? 
If one does not look about, one becomes weary.) 
From the bushes by the wayside. 
Stretching out her arm. 
She gathered roses. 

Wasting her time in these little pauses. 
I, who was not wasting mine. 
Went up to her and stopped — 
Toward me she suddenly turned her head — 
Nothing more graceful had ever struck my 

eyes — 
What a fresh face and what a charming smile! 
Without finding the least little word to say to 

her, 
I bowed to her and passed on, like a fool. 
She had seen my agitation 
And I had heard her laughing — 
At whom? At me — and it was but right. 
Like a little bird lighting on the road, 
That sings and hops before you, 
I still see the maiden 

Walking coquettishly. 

Walking coquettishly. 
Her basket in her hand, 
Like a little bird on the road. 
Ah! How charming she was! 
I saw her but an instant — 
And yet, and yet 
I think I shall never forget her. 



^ 



■^ 



"Promesse de mon avenir" from 
"Le Roi de Lahore" 

Aux troupes du Sultan qui menagaient Lahore, 

La royale citf, 
Notre puissance est redoutable encore; 
Corame si les chassait une invisible main, 
Ellas ont du desert regagn^ le chemin. 
Le peuple est rassure c'est mon nom qu'il 

acclame, 
Le calme est rentrg dans mon ame, 
Et je puis etre heureuxl 

Promesse, de mon avenir, O Sita r§ve de ma 

vie, 
O beautfi qui me fut ravie, Enfin tu vas 

m'appartenir! 
O Sital Viens charmer mon coeur amoureux, 
Viens sourire aux splendeurs du mondc, 
Viens charmer mon coeur amoureux! 

O Sita, viens, je t'attends, je t'aimel 

Ma main te garde un diadume, 

O Sital viens, je t'attends! 

O Sita! viens, je t'attends! 

Je t'aimel Sita tu seras reine! 

Ah! viens charmer mon coeur amoureux, 

Viens sourire aux splendeurs du monde, 

O Sita r6ve de ma vie, 

Viens charmer mon coeur amoureux! 

Viens! Sital ah! viens 1 



(Translation) 
The troops of the Sultan who gladly would have 

riven from us fair Lahore 
By our own might have from the field been 

driven. 
As if by hand unseen they have been driven 

out. 
Their swift flight from the desert resembleth a 

rout 
From care my people free loudly sound forth 

my praises! 
This calm my heart upraises 
I yet may happy be. 

O promise of a joy divine, Sita, thou dream 

of all my life! 
O beauty torn from me by strife, 

At last, at last thou shalt be mine! 
O Sita! O fair one, charm my loving heart. 
And ne'er again from me depart! and ne'er 

again from me depart! 

Come, Sita ! thy love for me rewarding, 

A crown to thee I am according, 

O Sital I wait for thee! 

O Sital I wait for thee I 

Sital Sita! my queen thou soon shalt be. 

Ah! Sita, O come, delight this heart. 

To thee the world its glory offers, 

To thee a king his crown now proffers, 

Come, Sita, O come, ah! be mine! 

Come, Sital Be mine! 



Ballade 

(Que Villon feit a la request e de sa mere pour 
prier NostreDame) 

Dame du ciel, regente terrienne, 
Empcriere des infernaulz palux, 
Recevez-moy, vostre humble chrestienne, 
Que comprinse soye entre vos esleuz, 

Ce non obstant qu'oncques riens ne valuz. 
Les biens de vous, ma dame et ma maistresse, 
Sont trop plus grans que ne suys pecheresse. 
Sans lesquelz bien ame ne peult merir 

N'avoir les cieulx je n'en suis menteresse. 
En ceste foy je vueil vivre et mourir. 
A vostre Filz dictes que je su's sienne; 
De luy soyent mes pechiez aboluz: 

Pardonnez-moy comme a I'Egipcienne, 
Ou comme il feist au clarc Theopolus, 
Lequel par vous fut quitte et absoluz, 
Combien qu'il cust au diable faict promesse 

Preservez-moy que je n'accomplisse eel 
Vierge portant sans rompure encourir 
La sacrement qu'on celebre a la messe. 
En ceste foy je vueil vivre et mourir. 

Femme je suis povrette et ancienne. 
Qui riens ne scay, oncques lettre ne leuz; 
Au moustier voy dont suis paroissienne, 
Paradis painct ou' sont harpes et luz, 

Et ung enfer ou dampnez sont boulluz: 
L'ung me faict paour, I'aultre joye et Hesse. 
La joye avoir faymoy, hualte Deesse, 
A qui pecheurs doibvent tous recourir, 

Comblez de foy, sans fainct ne paresse. 
En ceste foy je vueil vivre et mourir. 

(Old French) 



(Translation) 

Ballad 

(Made by Franqois Villon, at his mother's 
request as a prayer to the Virgin Mary) 

Lady of Heaven, of purgatory, 

Empress, Queen of Earth, and of all things 

here below. 
Virgin receive a humble Christian woman. 
Count me 'mongst thy chosen and elect. 

Well do I know I am nothing alone. 

Thy graciousness. Oh, Virgin Lady and 

mother, 
Is greater far than all my sins unnumbered. 
Without thy help not one can hope to mount 

the starry skies. 

Lady, well do I know it. 
And in this faith will I live here, and die, 
Say to thy son that by_ Him I was saved, 
All my sins were by him washed away. 

Pardon me, then, as pardoned was the Egyp- 
tian, 
Or, as 'tis said, Theophilus of old. 
Crying to thee, was freed from every sin. 
Though he had sold himself unto the devil. 

Lady, preserve me from such a fate as that, 
And guard and bless me as I humbly kneel 
For the blest Eucharist at the mass given. 
And in this faith I will live ' here and die. 

Alone, old woman I, so poor and weary; 
Naught do I know, not a word can I read. 
In the great monastery of my parish 
Picture of Heav'n and of Hell I do see. 

Ileav'n with its harps of gold, Hell with the 

damned, 
Fills me with fear one, and rapture the other. 
Be harps of gold for me, 
Lady of Heaven. 

To Thee may all sinners hasten in time. 
With faithful hearts, not doubting 
Thee nor slothful 
And in this faith will I live here and die. 



Chevaux de Bois 

Tournez, tournez, bons chevaux de bois, 
Tournez cent tours, tournez mille tours, 
Tournez souvent et tournez toujours. 
Tournez, tournez, au son des hautbois, 
L'enfant tout rouge et la mere blanche 
Le gars en noir et la fille en rose, 
L'une a la chose et I'autre a la pose, 
Cbacun se paie un sou de dinianche. 
Tournez, tournez, chevaux de leur cccur, 
Tandis qu'autour de tous vos tournis, 
Clignote I'ceil du filou sournois 
Tournez au son du piston vainqueur! 
C'est dtonnant comme ga vous soQle 
D'aller ainsi dans ce cirque bete 
Rien dans le ventre et mal dans la tete, 
Du mal en masse et du bien en foule, 
Tournez dadas, sans qu'il soit besoin 
D'user jamais de nuls ^perons 
Pour commander d. vos galops rends, 
Tournez, tournez, sans espoir de foin. 
Et dep^chez, chevaux de leur fime, 
D^ja voici que sonne ft la soupe. 
La nuit qui tombe et chasse la troupe, 
De gais buveurs que leur soif affame. 
Tournez, tournez, le ciel en velours, 
D'astres en or se vet lentement, 
L'Eglise tinte un glas tristement, 
Tournez au son joyeux des tambours 
Tournez. 



(Translation) 
Twirl! twirl! good wooden steeds; go round a 

hundred, go round a thousand times. Keep 

ever turning, never cease to bound. 
Twirl I twirl ! to the sound of the organ-reeds. 
The red-faced child with its white-faced mother, 

the fellow in black, and the girl in pink; 

one is interested, the other poses; each 

one pays his Sunday penny. 
Twirl! twirl! dear horses; and whilst you are 

turning, the eyes of the pickpocket gleam! 

Twirl! twirl! to the sound of the joyous 

trumpet. 
What exhilaration there is in this silly circus! 

An empty stomach, a splitting head, a 

crowd of discomfort, and a mass of con- 
tent. 
Twirl! twirl! gee-gees; no sharp spurs are 

needed to speed your round gallops. 
Turn! turn! without hope of hay. Haste, 

cherished steeds; the soup is preparing, 

night is falling and the gay drinkers, now 

famished, are homewardbound. 
Twirl! twirl! the velvety sky dons its starry 

mantle, the church bells are sadly tolling 

the death-knell. 
Twirl to the joyous sound of the drums — 

Twirl! 



Voici que le Printemps 

Voici que le printemps, ce fils Ifiger d'Avril, 
Beau page en pourpoint vert, brod6 de roses 

blanches, 
Parait leste, fringant et les poings sur les 

hanches, 
Comme un prince acclamS revient d'un long 

exil. 
Les branches des buissons verdis rendent 

etroite. 
La route qu'il poursuit, en dansant comme un 

fol; 
Sur son fpaule gauche il porte un rossignol, 
Un merle s'est pos& sur son epaule droite, 
Et les fleurs qui dormaient sous les mousses 

des bois, 
Ouvrent leurs yeux oii flotte une ombre vague 

et tendre, 
Et sur leurs petits pieds se dressent pour 

entendre, 
Les deux oiseaux siffler et chanter 4 la fois: 
Car le merle sifflote et le rossignol chante. 
Le merle siflBe ceux qui ne sont pas aimes, 
Et pour les amoureaux, languissant et charm^s, 
Le rossignol prolonge une chanson touchante. 



(Translafian) 

Across the hill tops comes the spring, blithe 
April's son! 

In doublet broider'd green, with roses sewn 
between ! 

He laughs lightly, with hand on his hip ad- 
vances brightly! 

Comes to his own like a monarch, his long, 
weary exile done ! 

The leafy branches crowd along the narrow 

byways, 
Where comes the lusty lad; be dances there 

like mad. 
He bears a nightingale high on one shoulder 

hale. 
The other bears a blackbird, piping boldly 

skyways. 

And the flow'rs who were sleeping 'mid the 

mossy wood, 
L'nveil their eyes where shadows are vague 

and tender. _ 
See them standing on tiptoe, their eager ears 

surrender, 
List'ning, the two birds singing together the 

while ! 

For the blackbird doth pipe and the nightingale 

chanteth. 
The blackbird, whistling, jeers at the lovelorn 

youth. 
And for those in Love's paradise, of smiling 

lips and eyes. 
Nightingale all the wood with melody en- 

chanteth ! 



iiiiii:inii.i mil ■uiMiiiiini.niiiiiiiiiipii.iiiij 



lii n ill , l l lll M lii n i , i im i l. lliiii im iiii i ii iniiliii iii.iiil l l l lll l lll l l l im mimmgl: 



La Maja dolorosa 
Num. 1. 



Oh muerte cruel 

Porqufe tu a traici6n mi majo arrebataste a mi 

pasion? 
No quiero vivir sin ^1 porque es morir 
porque es morir a si vivir! 

No es posible ya 

Sentir mfl.s dolor: en Iflgrimas deshecha mi 

alma es tfi. 
Oh Diosl torna mi amor porque es morir 
porque es morir asi vivir 1 



(Translation) 

Of That Adored Maja 

cruel death! 

Why hast thou betrayed me? 

My Maja thou hast torn from me. 

1 cannot be without her for it is death thus 

to live. 
It is not possible to feel such agony. 
By tears my soul is torn. 
O God! return my beloved to me 

For to exist thus is death. 



Cancion del Postilion 

Corre caballo pues quiero que lleguemos donde 

la noche pasemos, des cansando de las 

fatigas de hoy. 
Ve ligero! 

Para maSana cumplir 
el mensaje de amor 
que encarg6 mi seQor. 
Arrea ! 
Vuela ya 1 
Jasl Cisl Jas! 
Arrea 1 

quiero llegar ya. 
Arrea! 
que el mensaje de amor que me di6 mi seuor 

llegar debe mafiana. 
Arrea I 

Verfts como al fin de la Jornada bien 
te hallarfts. 

Corre caballo pues quiero que lleguemos 
donde la noche pasemos, descansando de las 

fatigas de hoy. 
Ve ligero! 

Para maSana cumplir 
el mensaje de amor 
que encarg6 mi seSor 
Arrea! 
Vuela ya! 
Jas! Cis! Jas! 



(Translation) 

Song of the Postillion 

Gallop along, we must hasten, night is falling 

Come, now give heed to my calling. 

Bring us where we may rest from the ride of 

today 1 
On we gallop! 
We must tomorrow arrive — 
Bring our message of love, 
Our master's love all the way, 
On our way! 
Fly along! 
Lash, whip, lash! 
Away, On ! 

We must arrive there! 
Away, Sir ! 
For the message our lord has intrusted to us 

must arrive on the morrow! 
We race on ! 
At last! 

See, there lies our journey's end; 
We'll dine; then we'll rest! 
Gallop along, we must hasten, night is falling. 
Come — now give heed to my calling. 
Bring us where we may rest from the ride 

of today ! 
On we gallop ! 
We must tomorrow arrive 
Bring our message of love 
Our master's love, all the way 
On our way! 
Fly along! 
Lash, whip, lash ! 



El tra la la y el punteado 

Es en balde majo mio que sigas hablando, 
por que hay cos as que contesto yo siempre 

cantando. 
Tra la la la la la la la la la la la la la la la 

la la. 
Por mas que preguntes tanto 
Tra la la la la la la; 
en mi no causas quebranto ni yo he de salir 

de mi canto 
la la la la la la. 



(Translation) 

The Tra, La, La, and the Rebuff 

It is in vain, my Maja, that you should con- 
tinue talking. There are some things that 
I only answer, saying, Tra, la, la, la. 
All your pointed questions, Tra, la, la, la, 
cannot ruffle me and they cannot stop my 
singing, Tra, la, la, la. 

It is in vain, my Maja, that you should con- 
tinue talking. There are some things that 
I only answer, saying, Tra, la, la, la, la. 




The Curtis Institute of Music 



CASIMIR HALL 
SIXTH SEASON, 19294930 



Twelfth Faculty Recital 



MR. CARLOS SALZEDO, Harpist 

MR. WILLIAM M. KINCAID, Flufisi 

MR. FELIX SALMOND, Violoncellisifc 

Collaborating 



'Wednesday Evening, May Seventh 



at 8.30 o'doc\ 



The Steinway is the ofiBcial piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 



Programme 



tr 



I. 

Jean 'Marie Leclair Sonate a trois 

1697-1764 for Flute, Violoncello and Harp 

Adagio — Allegro 
Sarabande 
Allegro assai 

II. 

Carlos Salzedo Five Preludes for harp alone 

(1917) 

Lamentation 

Quietude 

Iridescence 

Introspection 

Whirlwind 



III. 

Maurice Ravel Sonatine en trio 

(1905) for Flute, Violoncello and Harp 

(transcribed by Carlos Salzedo from the 
Sonatine for piano) 

Modere 

Mouvement de Menuet 

Anime 



Mr. Saliedo uses the Lyon (f Healy Harp exclusively 

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i 




by 



The Musical Art Quartet 



SASCHA JACOBSEN, First VioUn 

PAUL BERNARD, Second Violin 

LOUIS KAUFMAN. Viola 
MARIE ROEMAET-ROSANOFF. ViolonceUo 



Sunday Evening, December 1, 1929 

at 8.30 o'doc\ 



casimir hall 
The Curtis Institute of Music 



i 



Programme 
I. 

Johannes Brahms Quartet in C minor, Opus n. No. i 

Allegro 

Romanze: Poco adagio 

Allegretto molto moderato e comodo 

Finale: Allegro 

II. 

Claude Debussy From Quartet, No. i, Opus 10 

Anime et tres decide 
Andantino doucement expressif 
Assez vif et bien rythme 



III. 

Cesar Franck Quartet in D major 

Poco lento — Allegro 

Scherzo: Vivace 

Larghetto 

Finale: Allegro molto 



The Steinwat is the Official Piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 



I 



The Curtis Institute of Music 

CASIMIR HALL 
Sixth Season— 1929-1930 

First Students' Concert 

Thursday Afternoon, 7<lovemher 7, 1929, at 4:30 
By Students of Mr. Bailly in Chamber Music 

Gama Gilbert ^ v r ^'^ Aronoff, Viola 

Benjamin Sharlip f Orlando Cole, Violoncello 

Assisted by Joseph Levine, Piano 

LuDWiG VAN Beethoven String Quartet in E flat major, Opus 74 

(Harfenquartett) 
Poco adagio — Allegro 
Adagio ma non troppo 
Presto 
Allegretto con variazioni 

Louis Nicholas Clerambault .... Sonata in E minor, for Two Violins 

and Piano (La Magnifique) 

Symphonie 

Allegro 

Adagio 

Sarabande 

Gigue 

Allegro 

Hugo Wolf Italian Serenade, for String Quartet (in one movement) 

Cesar Fr.\NCK Quintet in F minor, for Piano and String Quartet 

Molto moderato quasi lento — Allegro 
Lento, con molto sentimento 
Allegro non troppo, ma con fuoco 

The Steinwat is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 



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The Curtis Institute of Music 

CASIMIR HALL 
Sixth Season— 1929-1930 

Second Students' Concert 

Tuesday Evening, J^ovemher 12, 1929, at 8:30 
By Organ Students of Mr. Farnam 

Paul de Maleingreau Toccata from Suite, Opus 14 

Robert Cato 

Marcel Dupre Berceuse and Spinning Song from "Suite Bretonne" 

Charles-Marie Wddor Finale from "Symphonic Gothique" 

Lawrence Apgar 

Jean Roger-Ducasse Pastorale 

Carl Weinrich 

Marcel Dupre Adagiosissimo — "He Remembering His Mercy" 

Harry Benjamin Jepson Toccata in G major 

Alexander McCurdy, Jr. 



The organ is an Aeolian 

The Steinway is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 



i 



The Curtis Institute of Music 

CASIMIR HALL 
Sixth Season— 1929-1930 

Third Students' Concert 

'Monday Evening, T^ovemher 25, 1929, at 8:30 o'chc\ 
By Students of Mr. Lambert 

Fellk Mendelssohn Phantasie, Opus 28 

BacH'D'' Albert Prelude and Fugue in D major 

Jennie Robinor 



Carl Marl\ von Weber Concertstuck in F minor, Opus 79 

(With orchestral part played on a second piano) 
Frances Shelton 



Frederic Chopin Nocturne in D flat major, Opus 27, No. 2 

LiszT'BusoNi La Campanella 

Jennie Robinor 



The Steinway is the official piano of The Clrtis Institute oj Music 



^ 



The Curtis Institute of Music 



CASIMIR HALL 
Sixth Season— 1929-1930 



Fourth Students' Concert 



By Students of 
MADAME LUBOSHUTZ 



IsAonday Evening, December 2, 1929 

at 8.30 o'chc\ 



Programme 

Thomas Vincent Cator Sonata in G major 

(Dedicated to Madame Luboshutz) 

Maestoso — Allegro moderato 
Adagio, molto espressivo e rubato 
Presto giocoso, ma non prestissimo 
(First performance) 

Judith Poska 
* Theodore Saidenberg at the Piano 



PlETRO NaRDINI 



CloncertO in E minor 

(Accompaniment for String Orchestra 
arranged by Jay Savitt**) 



Allegro moderato 
Andante cantabile 
Allegretto giocoso 

Celia Gomberg 



Ethel Stark 
Henry Siegl 
Robert Gomberg 
James Bloom 
Eva Stark 
Laura Gripping 



String Orchestra 



Leonard Mogill 



> Violirw 



i Violas 
Herbert van den Burg 1 

Frank Miller ( , 



■ Violoncelli 



David Filerman 
Jack Posell, Double Bass 
Conducted by Louis Wyner** 



*Student of Mr. Kaupman in Accompanying 
•*Student of Mr. Mlynarski in Conducting 



Programme 



£mil Mlyn.-\rski Allegro moderato from Concerto in D minor. 

Opus 11 (First performance in America) 
Judith Poska 
* Theodore Saidenberg at the Piano 



Ernest Ch.'^usson Poeme 

Celia Gomberg 
* Joseph Rubanoff at the Piano 



Alex^^ndre Glazounov Grand Adagio and Waltz from the 

Ballet ''Raymonda" 
Franz Ries La Capriccioso 

Heinrich Ernst Hungarian Airs 

Judith Poska 
* Theodore Saidenberg at the Piano 



* Srudent of Ms.. K.aufvc.\n in Accompanying 



^: 



The Curtis Institute of Music 

CASrMIR HALL 
Sixth Season— 19:9'1950 

Fifth Students' Concert 

Thursday Afternoon, December S, 1929, at 4.30 o'chc\ 
Students of Mr. Bailly in Chamber Music 

R\LPH Vaughan Wllll\ms String Quartet in G minor 

Allegro moderato 
Minuet 
Romance 
Finale 

Gama Gilbert Xy v ^^'^ Aronoff, Viola 

Benjamin Sharlipj Orlando Cole, Violoncello 

LuDwiG VAN Beethoven String Quartet in F major, Opus IS. No. 1 

Allegro con brio 

Adagio affettuoso ed appassionato 

Scherzo — Allegro molto 

Allegro 

Leonid Bolotine") ... ,. Leon Frengut, Viola 

Paul Gershman j Tibor de J^Iachula, Violoncello 



The Steinwat is the ofBcial piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 

a i 

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The Curtis Institute of Music 

CASIMIR HALL 
Sixth Season— 1929-1930 

Sixth Students' Concert 

Thursday Afternoon, December 12, 1929, at 4.00 o'cloc\ 
Students of Mr. Bailly in Chamber Music 

Jean-Philippe R.\meau From Concerts for Three Violins, Viola, 

Violoncello and Double Bass 
Le Vezinet 
La Boucon 
Menuet in G major 
La Timide 
Tambourins 

Judith Poska ") Paull Ferguson, Viola 

Lois Putlitz > Violins Frank Miller, Violoncello 

Carmela Ippolito ) Jack Posell, Double Bass 

Johannes Brahms Two Songs with accompaniment of 

Viola and Piano, Opus 91 
Gestillte Sehnsucht 
Geistliches Wiegenlied 

Josephine Jirak, Contralto 
Max Aronoff, Viola Florence Frantz, Piano 



LuDWiG VAN Beethoven Septet in E flat major, Opus 20, for Violin, 

Viola, Violoncello, Double Bass, Clarinet, 

Bassoon, and Horn 
Adagio — Allegro con brio 
Adagio cantabile 
Tempo di Menuetto 
Tema con variazioni — Andante 
Scherzo — Allegro molto e vivace 
Andante con moto alia marcia — Presto 

Leonid Bolotine, Violin Jack Posell, Double Bass 

Leon Frengut, Viola James Collis, Clarinet 

TiBOR de Machula, Violoncello Frank Ruggieri, Bassoon 
Henry Whitehead, Horn 

The Steinway is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 

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I 



The Curtis Institute of Music 

CASIMIR HALL 
Sixth Season— 1929-1930 

Seventh Students' Concert 

Tuesday Evening, December 17, at 8.30 

Students of Mr. Zimbalist 
* Theodore Saidenberg at the Piano 

Antonio Vivaldi CorxertO in F major, for Three Viohns (with 

accompaniment of String Orchestra) 
Cadenza b> Joseph Achron 
Allegro 
Adagio 
Allegro 

Harry Ben Gronsky Felix Slatkin 

Franklin Siegfried 

String Orchestra 

Philip Frank \ Sam Goldblum 1 yj^j^ 

Robert Levine / Herbert van den Burg j 

Henry SiEGL ! , ,. c i^r i 

T V VVioIitw Frank Miller I , ... 

Jack Kash / o ,-, ) Violoncell; 

_ 1 Samuel Geschichter 1 

James Bloom V 

David Cohen ) Jack Posell, Double Bass 

Conducted by Louis Wvner •• 

Peter I. Tschaikowsky . . . Allegro moderato from Concerto in D major. 

Opus 35 
Paul Gershman 

Max Bruch Scotch Fantasie, Opus 46 

Grave — Adagio cantabile 
Allegro — Andante sostenuto 
Finale 

Lois Putlitz 

Maurice Ravel Tzigane 

Erich Wolfgang Korngold Madchen im Brautgemach 

Karol Szymanowski Tarantella 

Leonid Bolotine 



* Student of Mr. Kaufman in Accompanying 
** Student of Mr. Mlynarski in Conducting 

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^E 



Tnis^concert wi.e given on j^nu:_iy loth, on account of 
Ivir. Ed ward Bok's death on January 9th. 



The Curtis Institute of Music 

CASIMIR HALL 
Sixth Season, 1929-1930 

Eighth Students' Concert 

Thursday/ Evening, January 9, 1930, at 8.30 o'cloc\ 
Max Aronoff, Violist 

Student of Mr. Bajlly 
*Florence Frantz at the Piano 

I. 

Jeno Hubay Morceau de Concert, Opus 20 

XL 

Karl Stamitz Concerto in D major, Opus 1 

Allegro 

Andante moderato 

Rondo 

III. 

Edward Willlam Elgar La Capricieuse, Opus 17 

Georges Bizet Aria from 'TArlesienne" 

NiccoLO Paganini Moto Perpetuo 



'Student of Mr. Kaufman in Accompanying 
The Steinw.^t is the official piano of The Curtis Institute o/ Music 



The Curtis Institute of Music 

CASIMIR HALL 
Sixth Season— 1929-1930 

Ninth Students' Concert 

'Monday Evening, January 13, J 930, at S.'iO o'clock^ 
Students of Mr. Bachm-\nn 

PlETRO NaRDINI Sonata in D major 

Adagio — Allegro con fuoco 

Larghetto 

Allegretto grazioso 

Alfredo d'Ambrosio Concerto in B minor, Opus 29 

Grandioso, moderato e sostenuto 

Andante 

Finale: Allegro 

Lily Matison 
* Joseph Rubanoff at the Piano 

CorellI'Kreisler La Folia 

Alexandre Glazounow Concerto in A minor. Opus 82 

Moderate — Andante — Allegro 

L4szl6 Steinhardt 
* Earl Fox at the Piano 



* Student of Mr. Kaupman in Accompanying 
The Steinway is the official piano of The Curtis Institute 0/ Music 



The Curtis Institute of Music 

CASIMIR HALL 
Sixth Season— 1929-1930 

Tenth Students' Concert 

Thursday Ajternoon, January li, J 930, at 4.30 o'c\oc\ 
Students of Mr. Bailly in Chamber Music 

Gama Gilbert Iv r '^^^^^^ Aronoff, Viola 

Benjamin Sharlip J Orlando Cole, WiolonccWo 

Assisted by 

Florence Frantz, Piano 

Leon Frencut, Viola James Collis, Clarinet 

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart , . String Quintet in C minor, Kochel No. 406, 

for Two Violins, Two Violas and 

Violoncello 
Allegro 
Andante 

Menuetto in canone 
Allegro 

Serge Prokofieff Overture on Hebrew Themes, Opus 34, 

for String Quartet, Piano and Clarinet 

Johannes Brahms Quintet in F minor, Opus 34, for 

String Quartet and Piano 
Allegro non troppo 
Andante, un poco adagio 
Scherso 
Finale (Poco sostenuto) — Allegro non troppo 



The Steinwat is the official piano of The Curtis Institute 0/ Music 

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The Curtis Institute of Music 



CASIMIR HALL 
Sixth Season, 1929-1930 

Eleventh Students' Concert 

Monday Evening, February 10, 1930, at S.iO oc\oc\ 
Students of Mr. Tabuteau in Wind Ensemble 

«^» 

LUDWIG VAN Beethoven Quintet in E flat major, Opus 

71, for Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, 
Bassoon, and Horn 

Adagio — i\llegro 

Adagio 

Menuetto 

Rondo: Allegro 

Maurice Sharp, Flute Robert McGinnis, Clarinet 

Robert Bloom, Oboe Ervin Swenson, Bassoon 

Henry Whitehead, Horn 

Paul DE WaiLLY Aubade for Flute, Oboe and Clarinet 

Maurice Sharp, Flute Robert Bloom, Ohoe 

Robert McGinnis, Clannet 

Alexandre Tansman La Danse de la Sorciere for Flute, Oboe, 

Clarinet, Bassoon, Horn and Piano 
Maurice Sharp, Flute Ervin Swenson, Bassoon 

Robert Bloom, Ohoe James Thurmond, Horn 

Robert McGinnis, Clarinet Theodore Saidenberg, Piano 



Gabriel Pierne, 



Pastorale Variee for Flute, Oboe, 

Clarinet, Two Bassoons and Horn 
Andantino 
Tema in canone 
Tourbillon 
Tempo di minuetto 
Alia siciliana 
Final 



Richard Townsend, Flute 
Robert Bloom, Ohoe 
Robert McGinnis, Clarinet 



Ervin Swenson 1 „ 

„ , e VBassoons 

WILLIAM SaNTUCCI) 

James Thurmond, Horn 



The Steinwat is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 



The Curtis Institute of Music 



CASIMIR HALL 
Sixth Season— 1929-1930 



Twelfth Students' Concert 

Monday Afternoon, February 17. 1930, at 5.00 o'cloc\ 
Students of Mr. Bailly in Chamber Music 



*^» 



LuDwiG VAN Beethoven . 



.Quartet in E flat major. Opus 16, for 
Piano. Violin, Viola and Violoncello 



Grave — Allegro, ma non troppo 

Andante cantabile 

Rondo — Allegro, ma non troppo 



Cecille Geschichter, Piano 
Carmela Ippolito, Violin 



Samuel Goldblum, Viola 
Katherine Conant, Violoncello 



Johannes Brahms. 



Trio in E flat major. Opus 40, for 

Piano, Violin and Horn 

Andante 

Scherzo — Allegro 

Adagio mesto 

Finale — Allegro con brio 

Joseph Levinb, Piano 
Iso Briselli, Vioh'n Henry Whitehead, Horn 



The Steinway is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 



The Curtis Institute of Music 

CASIMIR HALL 
Sixth Season— 1929-1930 

Thirteenth Students' Concert 

'Monday Evening, February 24, 1930, at 8.i0 o'cloc\ 
By Students of Mr. Salzedo 

Concert of Music for Eight Harps 

in Orchestral Formation 

William Cameron Victoria Mlrdock 

Alice Chalifoux Edna Phillips 

Flora Greenwood Reva Reatha 

Mary Griffith Flor.mne Stetler 

Conducted by Carlos Salzedo 
«^> 

I. 

Jean-Philippe Rameau Gavotte from "Le Temple dc la Gloire" 

1683-1764 

FR.\Ngois Couperin | Musette de Choisy 

1668-1733 ( Musette de Taverny 

II. 

Johann Sebastian Bach Sixth French Suite 

1685-1750 

Allemande 
Courante 
Sarabande 
Polonaise 
Gavotte 
Menuet 
Bourree 

III. 

Carlos Salzedo Fifteen Preludes 

(1927) 

Preludes I, II, III, IV, V, VI, VII, VIII, 

IX, X, XI have no title 
Prelude XII —Fanfare 
Prelude XIII— Cortege 
Prelude XIV — La Desirade 
Prelude XV — Chanson dans la nuit 

IV. 

Enrique Gr.^nados Spanish Dance, No. 5 

Claude Debussy Clair de lune 



Lyon (f Healy Harps 
The Steinwav is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 



The Curtis Institute of Music 

CASIMIR HALL 
Sixth Season— 1929-1930 

Fourteenth Students' Concert 

Thursday afternoon, February 27, 1930 at 4:30 o'cloc\ 
Students of Mr. B.\illy in Chamber Music 

Casimir Quartet 

Leokid Bolotine 1 „. ,. Leon FaENCUT, Viola 

Paul GztSBUAS j ^'^ "" Tibor db Machula, Violoncello 

Swastika Quartet 

Gama Gilbert \ v I Max Aronopp, Viola 

Benjamin Sharlip j Orlando Cole, Violoncello 

and 

Maurice Sh.\rp, Flute 

«^> 

Peter I. TsCHAIKOWSKY String Quartet in D major, Opus 1 1 

Moderate e semplice 

Andante cantabile 

Scherzo — Allegro non tanto e con fuoco 

Finale — Allegro giusto 

Casimir Quartet 

Louis Bourgault-DucoudR-AY Abergavenny: "Suite de themes 

populaires Gallois" — for String 
Quartet and Flute 

Moderato 

Andantino con moto 

Allegro moderato 

Lentissimo 

Allegro ma non troppo 

Moderato 

Modere 
Casimir Qu.artet and Mr. Sharp 

RhEINHOLD MORITZOVITCH GlIERE . Octet, Opus 5, for Four Violins, Two 

Violas, and Two Violoncelli 
Allegro moderato 
Allegro 
Andante 
Allegro assai 
Casimir and Swastik.\ Quartets 



The Steinw.^t is the official piano of The Clrtis Institute of Mvsic 



^™ 



i""" 'I in!!.:riii- 



The Curtis Institute of Music 

CASIMIR HALL 
Sixth Season— 1929-1930 

Fifteenth Students' Concert 

Monday Evening, March 24, 1930, at 8.30 o'cloc\ 

Students of Professor Auer 

♦Theodore Saidenberg at the Piano 



v^ 



Edward Elgar First movement from Concerto in B minor. 

Opus 61 

JoHANN Sebastian Bach Chaconne 

OSKAR ShUMSKY 



LUDWIG VAN Beethoven Sonata, No. 8, in G major, for Violin 

and Piano 
Allegro assai 

Tempo di minuetto 

Allegro vivace 

Johannes Brahms First movement from Concerto in 

D major, Opus 77 
George Pepper 



•Student of Mr. K.\upman in Accompanying 
The Steinwat is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 

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The Curtis Institute of Music 

CASIMIR HALL 
Sixth Season, 1929-1930 

Sixteenth Students' Concert 

Thursday Evening, March 27, 1930, at 8:2>0 oWoc\ 

Students of Mr. Bailly in Chamber Music 

Celia GombergK.. j. Esther Hare, Viola 

Eva Stark J Katherine Conant, Violoncello 

Josef Haydn String Quartet in C major. Opus 54, No. 2 

Vivace 

Adagio 

Menuetto — Allegretto 

Finale : Adagio — Presto 

Paul HiNDEMITH Acht Stiicke in der ersten Lage fiir 

Fortgeschrittenere, Opus 44 
Massig schnell 
Schnell 

Massig schnell 
Lustig — Massig schnell 
Schnell 

Massig schnell 
Lebhaft 
Massig schnell, munter 

Franz Schubert String Quartet in A minor. Opus 29 

Allegro ma non troppo 

Andante 

Menuetto — Allegretto 

Allegro moderato 



The Steinway is the official piano of The Curtis Institute o^ Music 

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The Curtis Institute of Music 



CASIMIR ^L^LL 
Sixth Season— 1929-1930 



Seventeenth Students' Concert 



Students of 
MR. CARLOS SALZEDO 

assisted by soloists from the Department of Woodwind 

and a Chamber Orchestra 

Conducted by Mr. Salzedo 



'Monday Evening, April 1 , 1939 

at 8:?)0 o'c\oc\ 



The Steinway is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 



Programme 



.Concerto for Flute and Harp 



Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart 

1756-1791 

Allegro 

Andantino 

Rondo 

*Maurice Sharp, Flute William Cameron, Harp 

Accompanied by 



Sidney Divinsky | „, 
Robert Hester j 



Carmela Ippolito] 
Henry Siegl ' 

James Bloom i 

Robert Gomberc J 



> Violi 



Theodore Seder \„ 
Luke del Negro J 



Samuel Goldblum 
Paull Ferguson 



■ Viole 



Frank Miller, Violoncello 
Jack Posell, Double Bass 



II. 

George Frederic Handel Concerto in B flat, for Oboe and Harp 

1685-1759 

Adagio — Allegro 

Siciliana 

Vivace 



**RoBERT Bloom, Ohoe 



Victoria Murdock, Harp 



*Student of Mr. Kincaid in Flute 
**Student of Mr. Tabuteau in Oboe 



p'l 



Programme 



ni. 

CARLOS Salzedo Preambule et Jeux* 

(1929) for harp prindpale, 

flute, oboe, bassoon, 
horn and string 
quintet 

Edna Phillips, Harp 
M.'\URICE Sharp, Flute Carmela Ippolito, First violin 

Robert Bloom, Oboe James Bloom, Second violin 

William Saktucci, Bassoon Samuel Goldblum, Viola 

Theodore Seder, Horn Frank Miller, Violoncello 

Jack Posell, Double Bass 



♦Preambule et Jeux was commissioned by Mrs. Elizabeth S. CooHdge, last summer, for 
her International Festivals of Contemporary Chamber Music. The first performance 
took place at Salle Gaveau, in Paris, on October 28, 1929. 

Lyon if Healy Harps 



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The Curtis Institute of Music 

CASrMlR HALL 
Sixth Season — 1929-1930 

Eighteenth Students' Concert 

'Wednesday Evening, April 9, 1930 at S.iO oc\oc\ 
Students of Mr. Salmond 

ArCANGELO CoRELLI Sonata in D minor 

Preludio : Largo 
Allemanda: Allegro 
Sarabanda : Largo 
Giga: Allegro 

Katherine Conant 
*YvoNNE Krinsky at the Piano 

CaMILLE SaINT'SaENS Concerto, No. l, in A minor, Opus 33 

Adine Barozzi 
*Earl Fox at the Piano 

Ernst von DoHNANYI Vrotn Sonata in B flat minor, Opus 8, 

for Violoncello and Piano 
Allegro ma non troppo 
Scherzo: Vivace assai 

Orlando Cole 
*Earl Fox at the Piano 

LuiGi Boccherini Vrom Concerto in B flat major 

Adagio 
Allegro 

TiBOR DE MaCHULA 

*YvoNNE Krinsky at the Piano 
David Popper Requiem, for Three Violoncelli, with 

Piano Accompaniment 
TiBOR DE MaCHULA 

Orlando Cole 
Katherine Conant 
*YvoNNE Krinsky at the Piano 

• Student of Mr. Kaufman in Accompanying 
The Steinwat is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 

■Ml 



The Curtis Institute of Music 

CASIMIR HALL 

Sixth Season— 1929-1930 

Nineteenth Students' Concert 

Thursday afternoon, April 10, 1930 at 4:00 o'doc\ 

Students of Mr. B.\illy in Chamber Music 

«^> 

Henry PuRCELL Chacony in G minor for Strings 



Cakmela Ippolito 
Lilt M,^tison 

FlL^NCES T^'lEXER. 
M.\E.IAN He. AD 

Gama Gilbert 
Benjamin Sh.arlip 
James Bloom 
George Pepper 



>• Violins 



Esther H.\re "] 

Margaret Hates I ,, , 
T c r Violas 

Leon trengut | 

Paull Ferguson ) 

Katherine Conant I 

Florence Williams I ,,. , „. 
_ . , > Violoncelli 

Frank Miller 



r 



Samuel Geschichteb 
* Conducted by LociS Wyxer 

LuiGI BOCCHERINI Quintet in C major, for Two Violins, 

Viola and Two Violoncelli 

Andante con moto 

Menuetto 

Grave 

Rondo 

Gama Gilbert ),, ,. Orlando Cole)... , „ 

„ „ ^VjoIiti5 „ -, >Vwloncelh 

Benjamin Sharlip J Frank Miller J 

Max Aronoff, Viola 



SeRGIUS TanEIEV Quartet in E major. Opus 20, for Piano, 

Violin, Viola and Violoncello 

Allegro brillante 
Adagio piu tosto largo 
Finale: Allegro molto 

Jennie Robinor, Piano Paull Ferguson, Viola 

Lois Putlitz, Violin Frank Miller, Violoncello 

♦Student of Mr. Mlynarski in Conducting 
Tte Steinwat is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 



The Curtis Institute of Music 

CASDvOR HALL 
Sixth Season, 1929-1930 

Twentieth Students' Concert 

Tuesda>' Evening, April 15, 1930, at 8:2,0 oc\oc\ 
Students of Mr. Torello in Double Bass 

and 

Students of Mr. Kincaid in Flute 

*Earl Fox at the Piano for Mr. Torello's Students 
*JosEPH RLB.\X0Fr at the Piano for >.!r. Kincaid's Students 

•^* 

CoRELLi'ToRELLO Three Pieces, for 

T VioHn and Double Bass 

Largo 

Sarabande 

Gavotte : Allegro 

**M\x G0BERM.\N, Violin 

Oscar Zimmerm.-.n, Double Bass 

Giorgio Antoniotti Sonata in G minor, for 

. J . 1^ ^ . Double Bass 

Adagio molto sostenuto 

Allegro 

Adagio 

Vivace 

Osc.\R Zimmerman 

L0REN2ITTI'N.\NNY GavOtte > for 

EmLE RatEZ Scherzo j Double Bass 

Jack Posell 

Giovanni Bottesini Tarentella 

Oscar Zimmerman 



Johann Seb.\stl\n B.\ch Polonaise and Badinerie from Suite in 

B minor, for Flute and Piano 
Ardelle Hookins 

Ch.\rles T. Griffes Poem, for Flute 

Maurice Sharp 

C^ciLE Chaminade Concertino, for Flute 

Rich.^rd Townsend 

AlBELARDO AlbISI "La Sorgente" from "Second Suite 

Miniature" for Three Flutes 
MwRiCE Sharp George Drexler John Hreachmack 

•Student of Mr. K.aufman in Accompanying. **Student of Madame Luboshutz. 
The Steixu-.\t is the ofBdal piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 



The Curtis Institute of Music 

CASI\nR HALL 
Sixth Season— 1929-1930 

TWENTY^FIRST STUDENTS' CONCERT 

Thursday Ajtemoon, April 17, 1930, at 4:20 o'cloc\ 
Students of Mr. Horner 

LUDWIG VAN Beethoven Sonata in F major, for Horn and Piano 

Allegro moderate 
Poco adagio, quasi andante 
Rondo: Allegro moderato 
James Thurmond, Horn 
*RuTH Jewett, Piano 

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart Concerto in E flat major, for Horn 

Allegro 

Romance : Larghetto 
Rondo: Allegro 
First movement: Theodore Seder 
Second and third movements: Henry \Vhitehe,\d 
**J0SEPH RuBANOFF at the Piano 

HeiNRICH HiJBLER Concertstiick in F major, for Four Horns 

Allegro maestoso 

Adagio quasi andante 

Vivace 

James Thurmon-d ' r . u 

=r c ? txrst Horns 

Iheodore oeder ( 

Hexrt Whitehead ) e j u 
A -D r iiicona norm 

Attillio de Palma I 

Harry Berv, Third Horn 

SuNE Johnson It- ^-l u 

T XT t Fourth Horns 

Luke del Negro J 

**JosEPH RtBANOFF at the Piano 

*Student of Mr. Saperton in Piano 
**Student of Mr. Kaufman in Accompanying 

The Steinwat is the oflicial piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 

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The Curtis Institute of Music 

CASIMIR HALL 
Sixth Season, 1929-1930 

TWENTY=SECOND STUDENTS' CONCERT 

Monday Everdng, April 28, 1930, at 8:?,0 o'cloc\ 
Students of Mr. Zimbalist 

■^* 

Robert Schumann Sonata in A minor. Opus 105, for Violin 

and Piano 

Mit leidenschaftlichem Ausdruck 

Allegretto 

Lebhaft 

Iso Briselli, Violin 

*J0SEPH Levine, Via-no 



Frederick A. Stock Concerto in D minor 

Molto moderato 

Adagio: Molto tranquillo 

Finale: Allegro ma non troppo 

Carmela Ippolito 

**Theodore Saidenberg at the Piano 



CaMILLE SaINT'SaENS Concerto, No. 3, in B minor. Opus 61 

Allegro non troppo 
Andantino quasi allegretto 
Molto moderato e maestoso 

Philip Frank 

**THEOnoRE Saidenberg at the Piano 



*Studcnt of Mr. Hofmann in Piano 
**Student of Mr. Kaufm.\n in Accompanying 

The Steinway is the official piano of The Curtis Institute o\ Music 



The Curtis Institute o/ Music 



CASIMIR HALL 
Sixth Season— 1929-1930 



TWENTY-THIRD STUDENTS' CONCERT 

Students of 
MR. DE GOGORZA 

Miss Helen Winslow at the Piano 



V^ednesday Evening, April 30, 1930 

at 8:30 o'cloc\ 



The Steinway is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 

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Programme 



'Z? 



I. 

George Frederic Handel "Revenge, Thimotheus Cries" from 

"Alexander's Feast" 

Old English The Bailiff's Daughter of IsHngton 

Anton Rubinstein Der Asra 

Benjamin de Loache, Baritone 
Accompaniments played by Theodore Saidenberg* 

II. 

CHARLES'pRANgoiS GoUNOD. ."Avant de quitter ces Heux" from "Faust" 

Modest Moussorgsky Song of the Flea 

Abraham Robofsky, Baritone 

III. 

Old English Shepherd! Thy Demeanor Vary 

Giuseppe Verdi "Ritorna Vincitor" from "Aida" 

Dagmar Rybner Pierrot 

tf Agnes Davis, Soprano 

IV. 

Christoph Willibald Gluck Air des Pelerins de la Mecque 

Maurice Ravel "Kaddisch" from "Deux 

Melodies Hebraiques" 

(Organ accompaniment played by Lawrence Apgar**) 

Modest Moussorgsky J ^repak 

) Schaklovity's Aria from "Khovantchina" 
Benjamin Groban, Baritone 
Accompaniments played by Theodore Saidenberg* 



#MisE Dsvis ill. Did not sin,f> 

'Student of Mr. Kaupman in Accompanying 
•*Student of Mr. Farnam in Organ 



Programme 



tf 



V. 
Ottorino Respighi Nebbie 

PlETRO CiMARA Stomcllo 

GiocoMO Puccini "E lucevan le stelle" from "Tosca" 

FlORENZO Tasso, Tenor 

VI. 

GusTAV Mahler Nun seh' ich wohl, warum so dunkle Flammen 

Johannes Brahms Die Mainacht 

Reynaldo H.\hn Trois jours de Vendange 

Emmanuel Chabrier Llle Heureuse 

Henri Duparc Soupir 

Claude Debussy Void que le Printemps 

Conrad Tkibault, Baritone 

VII. 

Giuseppe Verdi Duet : "Miserere" from "II Trovatore" 

for Soprano, Tenor and Chorus 
if Agnes Davis, Soprano 
F10REN20 Tasso, Tenor 

Benjamin de Loacke J 

***Daniel Nealt ) _ Benjamin Groban f _ 

»..., . , , } Tenon a r> )• baritones 

*■" Albert XvIahler ) Abraham Robofsky 1 

Conrad Thibault J 



if On account o^ VXss D^vis^ illness, ^'..ildred Gable 
substituted. 



•**Student of Mr. Connell in Voice 
The Organ is an Aeolian 



m 



The Curtis Institute of Music 



CASIMIR HALL 
Sixth Season— 1929-1930 



Twenty-fourth Students' Concert 



Students of 
MISS VAN EMDEN 



T^hursday Evening, May I, 1930 

at 8:30 o'doc\ 



The Steinwat is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 



Programme 
I. 

GiOACCHiNO Rossini Selections from "Stabat Mater" 

Duet for two sopranos: 

Irene Singer Paceli Diamond 

Soprano solo and Quartet: 

Irene Singer 

Eleanor Lewis ***Albert Mahler fy 

Paceli Diamond ***Arthur Holmgren 

*Alexander McCurdy, Jr., at the Organ 

II. 

Modest Moussorgsky The Song of Solomon 

Reinhold Becker Friihlings^eit 

„ ^ /Die Nacht 

Richard Strauss j Y)er Pokal 

"; Paceli Diamond, Soprano 

**Theodore Saidenberg at the Piano 

III. 

Bergerette Jeunes Filletes 

Georges Bizet Chanson de la Rose 

Robert Schumann Friihlingsnacht 

Johannes Brahms Der Jager 

Charles Huerter Pirate Dreams 

Liza Lehmann The Cuckoo 

Frances Sheridan, Soprano 
*'''Earl Fox at the Piano 



#0n c.ccoiiiit of Ivir. Mahler's illness, Daniel Healy 
substituted, 

/ivaviisfc' Diamond ill. Did not sin;:. 

*Student of Mr. Farnam in Organ 
**Student of Mr. Kaufman in Accompanying 
***Student of Mr. Connell in Voice 



^5 



Programme 

IV. 

C.\RL M.\RLA VON Weber "Annchen's Aria" from "Der Freischijtz" 

Richard Strauss "Du meines Herzens Kronelein" 

Johannes Brahms Treue Liebe 

GusTAV Mahler "Blicke mir nicht in die Lieder" 

Hugo Wolf Verborgenheit 

Eleanor Lewis, Soprano 

**Earl Fox at the Piano 



V. 

Alfredo Casella Tre Canzone Trecentesque 

Rudolph MeNGELBERG JDU Schlafst \ First performance 

|Der Nebel Zerrissj >« America 

Peter I. Tsch.\ikowsky J Warum 

(^ Standchen des Don Juan 

Selma Amansky, Soprano 

**Theodore Saidenberg at the Piano 



VI. 

Abram Chasins i Dreams 

) Thou art Mine (Fim performance) 
The Composer at the Piano 

Felk Fourdr.\in Le Soleil et La Mer 

CharleS'Fr.\ncois Gounod "Jewel Song" from "Faust" 

Selma Amansky, Soprano 
**Theodore Saidenberg at the Piano 



**Student of Mr. Kaufman in Accompanying 



The Curtis Institute of Music 



CASIMIR H.\LL 
Sixth Season— 1929-1930 



TWENTY=FIFTH STUDENTS' CONCERT 



Programme of Original Compositions 

by Students of 

MR. ROSARIO SCALERO 

in Composition 



lAonday Evening, May 5, 1930 

at 8:30 o'doc\ 



The Steinwat is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 



SyJIilirilillim 



I. !i"i;'n~TT: 



I Hllil0 ^g> 



Programme 
I. 

Alice Noon an Choral and Fugue in B minor, for Organ 

Played by Carl Weinrich* 

11. 

Eleanor Meredith. . .Choral Prelude and Fugue in F minor, for Organ 
Played by Lawrence Apgar* 

III. 

Jeanne BeHREND Fugue in D major, for Piano 

Played by the Composer 

IV. 

Gl\N'CaRLO Menotti Eleven Variations for Piano on a Theme 

of Robert Schumann 
Played by Jeanne Behrend** 



Berenice Robinson Three Songs for Soprano — 

Denn muss ich Sterben 
Schlusse mir die Augen Beide 
An Einen Botin 
Sung by Helen Jepson*** 
Edith Evans Braun at the Piano 



*Student of Mr. Farnam in Organ 

**Student of Mr. Hofmann in Piano 

***Student of Mr. Connell in Voice 



Programme 

VI. 

Edith Evans BrAUN Adagio from Piano Sonata 

Played by Martha Halbwachs** 

Edith Evans Bil^un Two Songs for Soprano — 

She goes all so Softly 
The Fountain 
Sung by Helen Jepson*** 
The Composer at the Piano 



VII. 
Samuel B.\rber Serenade for String Quartet 

Adagio — ^Allegro con spirito 

Andante 

Dance 

Finale: Allegro moderate 

Played hy the Swasti\a Quartet**** 
Gama Gilbert )... ,. Max Aroxoff, Viola 



} 



Benjamin Sharlip j Orlando Cole, Violoncello 



••Student of Mr. Hofmaxn in Piano 
•**Student of Mr. Connell in Voice 
•***Student3 of Mr. Baillt in Chamber Music 



The organ is an Aeolian 



The Curtis Institute of Music 



CASIMIR K.\LL 
Sixth Season — 1929-1930 



TWENTY=SIXTH STUDENTS' CONCERT 



Students of 
MR. CONNELL 



Thursday Evening, May 8, 1930 

at 8:30 o'doc\ 



The Steinway is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 

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Programme 
I. 

Franz Schubert Der Atlas 

Negro Spiritual — (Arranged by J. R. Johnson) 

O, Gambler, git up off o' yo' Knees 

Giuseppe Verdi "Eri tu che macchiavi" from "Un Ballo 

in Maschera" 
Walter Vassar, Baritone 
*J0SEPH RuBANOFF at the Piano 

II. 

GiACOMO Puccini "Che gelida Manina" from "La Boheme" 

Maurice Besly Listening 

Jules Massenet "Ah! Fuyez, douce image" from "Manon" 

Albert Mahler, Tenor 
* Joseph Rubanoff at the Piano 

III. 

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart "Deh vieni, non tardar?" from "Le 

Nozze di Figaro" 

Charles E. Horn Fve been Roaming 

Carl Maria von Weber "Leise, leise, f romme Weise" from 

"Der Freischiitz;" 

Florence Irons, Soprano 
*Earl Fox at the Piano 

IV. 

PlETRO MasCAGNI "Siciliana" from "Cavalleria Rusticana" 

Johannes Brahms Auf dem Schiffe 

Jacques Halevy "Rachele, allor chi Iddio" from "L'Ebrea" 

Herman Gatter, Tenor 
*Elizabeth Westmoreland at the Piano 

V. 

Johannes Brahms. . . .Quartet: "How Lovely is Thy Dwelling Place" 

from "The Requiem" 
Florence Irons, Soprano Daniel Healy, Tenor 

Rose Bampton, Contralto Arthur Holmgren, Baritone 

♦Elizabeth Westmoreland at the Piano 



•Student of Mr. Kaufman in Accompanying 

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Programme 

VI. 

JoHANN Sebastian Bach "Agnus Dei" from "Mass in B minor" 

(Organ accompaniment played by Alexander McCubjjy, Jr.**) 
Franz Schubert Liebesbotschaft 

Charles-Fran gois Gk)UNOD. . ."O, ma lyre immortelle" from "Sappho" 

Rose Bampton, Contralto 

♦Joseph Rubanoff at the Piano 

VII. 

LuDWTG VAN Beethoven Adelaide 

Old French Bergere Legere 

Richard Wagner Siegmund's Liebeslied from "Die Walkiire" 

Daniel Healy, Tenor 
♦Elizabeth Westmoreland at the Piano 

VIII. 
Fr.'IlNZ Schubert An die Leier 

RlCH.MlD Wagner "Blick' ich umber" from "Tannhauser" 

(Harp accompaniments played by Edna Phillips***) 

RlCH.\RD Wagner ,. . . ."Schuster Lied" from "Die Meistersinger" 

Arthur Holmgren, Baritone 
*Earl Fox at the Piano 

IX. 

Joseph Marx Hat dich die Liebe beriihrt 

Max Reger Maria Wiegenlied 

Charles-Fran gois Gounod "Jewel Song" from "Faust" 

Helen Jepson, Soprano 
*Earl Fox at the Piano 

X. 

Giuseppe Verdi .... Quartet : "Bella figlia dell'amore" from "Rigoletto" 

Helen Jepson, Soprano Albert Mahler, Tenor 

Rose Bampton, Contralto Clarence Reinert, Baritone 

Gaetano Donizetti Sextet: "Chi mi frenza" from 

"Lucia di Lammermoor" 
Helen Jepson, Soprano Daniel Healy, Tenor 

Rose Bampton. Contralto Clarence Reinert 1 „ . 

Albert Mahler, Tenor Arthi-r Holmgren j " " 

•Earl Fox at the Piano 

•Student of Mr. Kaufman in Accompanying 
•*Student of Mr. Farnam in Organ 
•••Student of Mr. Salzedo in Harp 



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The Curtis Institute of Music 



CASIMIR HALL 
Sixth Season, 1929-1930 



TWENTY-SEVENTH STUDENTS' CONCERT 



Students of 
MADAME SEMBRICH 

Sylvan Levin at the Piano 



Friday Evening, May 9, 1930 

at 8:30 o'cloc\ 



The Steinwat is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 

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Programme 
'?? 
I. 

Giuseppe Torelli Tu lo sai 

Georges Bizet Micaela's Aria from "Carmen" 

TosEF Marx I ^^"^ gestem hat er mir Rosen gebracht 

I Der Bescheidene Schafer 

Edward Horsman You are the Evening Cloud 

Richard Hageman At the Well 

Natalie Bodanskaya, Lyric Soprano 



II. 

Marc' Antonio Cesti Ah! Quanto e Vero 

Giuseppe Verdi "Caro nome" from "Rigoletto" 

Richard Strauss I ?T, •^i.^''^^ w 

( Schlechtes Wetter 

Wintter Watts Stresa 

Richard Hageman "Me Company Along" 

Charlotte Simons, Lyric Soprano 



III. 

Amilcare Ponchielli "Suicidio" from "La Gioconda" 

Peter I. Tschaikowsky Warum (sung in Russian) 

Richard Wagner Traume 

Giuseppe Verdi "Ritorna Vincitor" from "Aida" 

Genia Wilkomirska, Dramatic Soprano 



KIIIII I IIIIIIIIIII III I III III I I I II IIII I II I I II I I IIIIIII III IIIII II I III II II I i mi l l l l ll llllll ll l lll l l l ll l l llllllllMll iTmniiniiii liiliiilliill i ii i iiii i ii ii iiiiiiiiii n i i rri iii ii i |lmllg 



Programme 

'TS' 

IV. 

Robert Schumann Roselein, Roselein 

Hugo Wolf Elfenlied 

[Der Stem 

Richard Strauss ^Einerlei 

I Zerbinetta's Aria from 
^ "Ariadne auf Naxos" 

ff Henrietta Horle, Coloratura Soprano 



V. 

George Frederic Handel. ."O, Thou that tellest good tidings to Zion" 

from "Messiah" 
(Organ accompaniment played by Alexander McCurdy, Jr.*) 

Richard Strauss Ruhe, meine Seele 

Robert Schumann Widmung 

Erich J. Wolff Faden 

Richard Wagner "Erda's Warnung an Wotan" 

from "Das Rheingold" 

Franz Schubert Gruppe aus dem Tartarus 

Josephine Jirak, Contralto 



# On account ol' iUiss Horle 's illness, Edna 
Hochs tetter Gorday substituted. 



•Student of Mr. Faenam in Organ 
The organ is an Aeolian 

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The Curtis Institute of Music 

CASEMIR HALL 
Sixth Season— 1929-1930 

Twenty-eighth Students' Concert 

Monday Evening, Mav 12, 1930 at S-.^iO oc\oc\ 
Students of M.\dame Luboshutz 

*J0SEPH RuBAXOFF at the Piano 

I. 

BaCH'SiLOTI Partita in E minor 

Prelude: Maestoso 
Adagio ma non troppo 
Allemande 
Gigue 

Eva Stark 

n. 

Ernst vox Dohxaxyi First movement from Concerto in 

D minor 
Hexry Siegl 

III. 

G.^BRIEL Faure Berceuse 

S.\iXT'S.\EXS — YsAYE Valse Caprice 

Robert Gomberg 

rv. 

Edward Elg.\r First movement from Concerto in 

B minor, Opus 61 
James Bloom 

♦Student of Ms.. K.acfviak in Accompan5^ng 
The Steixwat is the official piano of The Clrtis Ixstitlte of Music 



The Curtis Institute of Music 

CASIMIR HALL 
Sixth Season— 1929-1930 

TWENTY=NINTH STUDENTS' CONCERT 

Tuesday Evening, May 13, 1930 at 8:30 o'cloc\ 

Students of Mr. Bailly in Chamber Music 

«^» 

LUDWIG VAN Beethoven Trio in B flat major, Opus 97, for Piano, 

Violin and Violoncello 
Allegro moderato 
Scherzo — Allegro 

Andante cantabile, ma pero con moto 
Allegro moderato 

Joseph Levine, Piano 
Iso Briselli, Violin Orlando Cole, Violoncello 

Francis Poulenc Le Bestiaire ou cortege d'Orphee, for 

Voice, Flute, Clarinet, Bassoon, Two 
Violins, Viola, Violoncello 

Le Dromadaire 

La Chevre du Thibet 

La Sauterelle 

Le Dauphin 

L'Ecrevisse 

La Carpe 
Rose Bampton, Contralto Samuel Geschichter, Violoncello 

Philip Frank ) y j. Maurice Sharp, Flute 

Ladislaus Steinhardt f James Collis, Clarinet 

Samuel Goldblum, Viola William Santucci, Bassoon 

Johannes Brahms Sonata in E flat major. Opus 120, No. 2, for 

Clarinet and Piano 
Allegro amabile 

Appassionato, ma non troppo Allegro 
Andante con moto — Allegro 
Robert McGinnis, Clarinet Jean-Marie Robinault, Piano 

The Steinway is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 

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The Curtis Institute of Music 

CASIMIR HALL 
Sixth Season— 1929-1930 

Thirtieth Students' Concert 

'Wednesday Evening, May 14, 1930 at 8:30 o'cloc\ 
Students of Madame Vengerova 

I. 

Wolfgang Amadeus Moz.\rt Pastorale Variee 

Carl Marl\ von Weber Perpetuum Mobile 

Nikolai Medtner Fairy Tale in E minor. Opus 26 

Ernst Toch Der Jongleur 

Selma Frank 

II. 

RameaU'Leschetizky Gavotte and Variations 

Nikolm Medtner Fairy Tale in F minor, Opus 26 

Anton ArenSKY Etude in F sharp major 

Frederic Chopin Scherzo in B flat minor 

Cecille Geschichter 

III. 

BacH'Busoni Prelude and Fugue in D major 

Sergei Rachmaninov T Moment Musical in B minor 

1^ Moment Musical in E minor 

Eugene Helmer 

IV. 

Gluck — SainT'Saens Caprice on the Ballet Airs from "Alceste" 

Robert Schumann First movement from Sonata in G minor 

WagneR'Brassin Feuerzauber 

Bella Braverman 

V. 

Johannes Brahms Intermezzo in A minor. Opus 116 

Maurice Ravel Jeux d'Eau 

Claude Debussy La fille aux cheveux de lin 

Franz Liszt Spanish Rhapsody 

Florence Frantz 

The Steinway is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 



m 



The Curtis Institute of Music 

CASIMIR HALL 
Sixth Season— 1929-1930 

Thirty^fiust Students' Concert 

Thursday Evening. "May 15, 1930 at S:iO o'c\oc\ 

Leonid Bolotine, Violinist 
Graduate Student of Mr. Zimbalist 

*Theodore Saidenberg at the Piano 

I. 

RosARio ScALERO Fourteen Variations on a Theme by 

W. A. Mozart, Opus 8 

n. 

Jean Sibelius Concerto in D minor. Opus 47 

Allegro moderate 
Adagio di molto 
Allegro, ma non tanto 

III. 

Johannes Brahms Intermewo, Opus 117, No. 2 

(Transcribed for Violin by Leonid Bolotine) 

Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov The FHght of the Bumble-bee 

Fritz Kreisler La Gitana 

Rimsky-Korsakov — Zimbalist .... Concert Phantasy — "Le Coq d'Or" 



•Student of Mr. K.^upMAN in Accompanying 
The Steinway is the official piano of The Curtis Institute oj Music 

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The Curtis Institute of Music 

CASIMIR HALL 
Sixth Season— 19294930 

Thirty-second Students' Concert 

Tuesday Ajternoon, May 20, 1930, at 4:30 o'cloc\ 

Students of Mr. Cailliet in Clarinet 

and 
Students of Mr. Guetter in Bassoon 

*Earl Fox at the Piano for Mr. Cailliet's Students 
♦Joseph Rubanoff at the Piano for Mr. Guetter's Students 

Johannes Brahms Sonata in F minor for Clarinet and Piano 

(First and last movements) 

James Collis 

Wolfgang AmADEUS Mozart. . .Trio in E flat major, for Two Clarinets 

and Piano (First movement) 

Leon Lester and Robert Hartman 

Reynaldo Hahn Sarabande et Theme Varie, for Clarinet 

Felix Meyer 

Claude Debussy l?f^^Pi''^l oT ■ . 

(Rhapsodie ) Clannet 

Robert McGinnis 



Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart Two movements from Concerto 

in B flat major, for Bassoon 
First movement (Allegro) : William Polisi 
Second movement (Andante ma adagio): Frank Ruggieri 

Julius Weissenborn (Ballade | for 

( Scherbo ) Bassoon 
Ervin S wen son 



•Student of Mr. Kaufman in Accompanying 
The Steinway is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 



T?iE Curtis Institute of Music 

CASIMIR HALL 
Sixth Season— 1929-1930 

Thirty=thirjd Students' Concert 

'Wedr.esday Evening, May 21, 1930, at 8.30 o'cloc\ 
Students of Mr. Hofnlann 

Robert Schumann Kreisleriana, Opus 16 

Anton Rubinstein *First movement from Concerto in D minor 

Joseph Levine 

Wolfgang Anl\deus Mozart. Nine Variations on a Minuet by Duport 

Johannes Br.ahms Ballade in D minor. Opus 10, No. l 

Robert Schumann Intermezzo in B minor, Opus 4, No. 6 

( Etude in C sharp minor. Opus 10, No. 4 

Frederic Chopin -(Etude in G sharp minor. Opus 25, No. 6 

f Etude in A minor. Opus 25, No. 11 
Martha Halbwachs 

Frederic Chopin *First Movement from Concerto 

in E minor. Opus 11 

Franz Liszt Venezia e Napoli 

Leonard Cassini 

Ces.^ Fr-ANCK Prelude, Choral and Fugue 

Frederic Chopin Scherzo in B flat minor. Opus 31 

Jeanne Behrend 

Johann Sebastian Bach Fantasy in D major 

Is.\.^c Albeniz IS^?}'^'!'^^^^ 

™ c - ( Prelude 

Tatiana de Sanzewitch 



•Orchestral part played on a second piano by Theodore Saidenberg — 
student of Mr. Kaufman in Accompanying 

The Steinway is the offidal piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 



The Curtis Institute of Music 

CASIMIR HALL 
Sixth Season— 19294930 

Thirty-fourth Students' Concert 

Thursday Evening, May 22, 1930, at 8:30 o'cloc\ 
By Students of Mr. Bailly in Chamber Music 

Anton ArENSKY Trio in D minor. Opus 32, for Piano, Violin, and 

Violoncello 

Allegro moderato 
Scherzo — Allegro molto 
Elegia — Adagio 
Finale — Allegro non troppo 

Yvonne Krinsky, Piano 
Iso Briselli, Violin Frank Miller, Violoncello 



Felix Mendelssohn. . . .Octet, in E flat major, Opus 20, for Four Violins, 

Two Violas, Two Violoncelli 

Allegro moderato, ma con fuoco 

Andante 

Scherzo — Allegro leggierissimo 

Presto 

OsKAR Shumsky J Max Aronoff /,,. , 

Henry Siegl (y. ,. Leonard Mogill ^violas 

James Bloom C *° '" Florence Williams K^. , „. 

Jack Kash ) Samuel Geschichter r'°^°"""' 



The Steinway is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 

(i^mUlUl i |||| |i | | || | || | |||| ii' || [| | | |ll l ll ll lll l l| i |llllllll llll lll l l l l 'l l lll l| i||'l l l l i ll l li lllllll l lllll ll l l| liii I llllin mil iiiiiniiiiiimim i iiii i i M ll l llliri M lllll? 



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The Curtis Institute of Music 



CASIMIR H.\LL 
Sixth Season— 1929-1930 

Thihty-fifth Students' Concert 

Monday Evening, May 26, 1930 at 8:30 o'doc\ 

Students of Mr. Saperton 

«^» 

JOHANX SeBASTUN BaCH Fantasy in C minor 

Jeaxette W'einsteix 

Ces.\r Fr.\nck Prelude, Choral and Fugue 

Jorge Bolet 

Felix Mendelssohn j Rondo Capriccioso 

Lilian Bat kin ^ Scherzo in E minor 

I Des Abends 

Robert Schu.xl.nn ,' Traumcsvdrren 

\ rabel 

(in der Nacht 

Jorge Bolet 

Felix Mendelssohn Fantasy in F sharp minor, Opus 28 

Jeanette Weinstein 

(Nocturne in E major, Opus 62, No. 2 

Frederic Chopin -^Marurka m C sharp minor. Opus 30, No. 4 

(Etude in A minor. Opus 10, No. 2 
LiLUN Bat KIN 

MANUEL DE F.\LLA | Cubana 

( Andaluza 

Strauss— Schulz-Evler Concert Arabesques on the 

Blue Danube Waltz 
Jorge Bolet 



The Steinwav is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 



l!!l,',|llllMI'rTCTr 



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The Curtis Institute of Music 

CASIMIR HALL 
Sixth Season, 1929-1930 

Thirty=sixth Students' Concert 

Tuesday Evening, May 27, 1930, at 8:30 o'doc\ 
Students of Mr. F.\rnam 

Ch.\RLES'1v1^RIE WiDOR Scherzo from the Eighth Symphony 

JOHANN Sebastian Bach Fugue in G major (i2/8 time) 

Helen M. Hewitt 

Robert Schumann Canon in B minor 

JOHANN Sebastian Bach Vivace from Second Trio-Sonata 

Alexander McCurdy, Jr. 

William Byrd Pavane (The Earl of SaHsbur>0 

Joh.\nn Sebastl\n Bach Prelude and Fugue in G major 

Lawrence Apgar 

Louis Vierne Scherzo and Finale from Fifth Symphony 

Carl Weinrich 

(Un Poco Allegro from the Fourth 

JoHANN SeBASTL\N Bach < Trio- Sonata 

(Prelude and Fugue in A minor 
Robert Cato 



The Organ is an Aeolian 
The Steimwat is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 



The Curtis Institute of Music 

CASIMIR HALL 
Sixth Season— 1929-1930 

Thirty-seventh Students' Concert 

"Wednesday evening. May 28, 1930, at 8:30 o'cloc\ 
By Students of Mr. Bailly in Viola 

*«^ 

JoHAXN Sebastl\n Bach . . SLxth Brandenburg Concerto, in B flat major, 

for Two Violas and Orchestra (Piano reduction) 
Allegro moderato 
Adagio ma non tanto 
Allegro 

Leonard Mogill Paull Ferguson 

*Theodore SAroEXBERG at the Piano 

Joseph JoXGEN Suite for Viola and Orchestra, Opus 48 

(Piano version by composer) 
Poeme filegiaque 
Final 

Leox Frexgut 
*Yvoxxe Krinsky at the Piano 

Georges Hue Theme varie (in one movement) 

Leoxard Mogill 
*Yvoxxe Krixsky at the Piano 

Paul Kexri Busser Catalane sur des airs populaires Basques 

(in one movement) 

Max Aroxoff 
*YvoxxE Krixsky at the Piano 



♦Student of Mr. K.\lfman in Accompanying 
The Steinwat is the official piano of The Curtis Ixstitute oj Music 

I " ,1 :• : :: :'":'' i ,'i 'r . • :: ! !i ',iii! i Hiiiiii.i'!!iMiiiiiiM; i '.:■ 



THE PHILADELPHIA FORUM 

PRESENTS 

The Curtis Institute Orchestra 

Emil Mlynarski, Conductor 

IN CONCERT 

THE ACADEMY OF MUSIC 
Wednesday Evening, February 5, 1930, at 8.30 

PROGRAM: 

Ludwig van Beethoven Overture to Egmont 

Johannes Brahms Double Concerto in A minor, 

for Violin and Violoncello 
with Orchestra 
Allegro 
Andante 
Vivace non troppo 

Judith Poska, Violinist 
TiBOR DE Machula, ViolonccUist 

Richard Straus Sj^mphonic Tone-Poem — 

"Don Juan" 

Cesar Franck Symphonic Variations for 

Piano and Orchestra 
Tatiana de Sanzewitch, Pianist 

Friedrich Smetana Overture to "The Bartered 

Bride" 
The Piano is a Steinivay 



BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 

Goodhart Hall, Wednesday, February 12th, 1930 
At 8.20 P. M. 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE ORCHESTRA 
Emil Mlynarski, Conductor 

ASSISTED BY 

Judith Poska, Violinist 

TiBOR DE Machula, VioloncelUst 

Tatiana de Sanzewitch, Pianist 



Ludwig van Beethoven Overture to "Egmont" 

Johannes Brahms Double Concerto in A minor 

For Violin and Violoncello with Orchestra 
Allegro 
Andante 
Vivace non troppo 

Judith Poska 
Tibor de Machula 



INTERMISSION 



Richard Strauss Symphonic Tone-Poem — "Don Juan" 

Cesar Franck Symphonic Variations 

For Piano and Orchestra 
Tatiana de Sanzewitch 

Friedrich Smetana Overture to "The Bartered Bride" 



Bryn Mawr College wishes to express its gratitude to Mrs. Mary 
Louise Curtis Bok for her generosity in giving this concert. 



The Piano is a Steinway 




The Curtis Institute of Music 

Josef Hofmann, Director 



Presents 

THE CURTIS ORCHEST 



ConJucior: EMIL MLYNARSKI 



Soloists: ARTIST STUDENTS 
TIBOR DE MACHULA, Violoiicellisi 
JUDITH POSKA, Violinist 
TATIANA DE SANZEWITCH, Pianist 



Symphony Hall 
Boston 



Sunday Evening, March 'H.inth 

at 8:15 o'cloc\ 



The Curtis Orchestra, composed of one hundred 
three students of The Curtis Institute of Music. 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, is augmented for this 
occasion by five professionals, all of whom are 
faculty members of the Institute. 



^J 



r^ 



PROGRAMME 

Richard Wagner Prelude to "Die Meistersinger" 

Johannes Brahms Double Concerto in A minor, 

for Violin and Violoncello 
with Orchestra 

Allegro 

Andante 

Vivace non troppo 

Richard Strauss Symphonic Tone-Poem — -"Don Juan" 

INTERMISSION 

CiSAR FraNCK Symphonic Variations for Piano and Orchestra 

Friedrich Smetan a Overture to "The Bartered Bride" 



The Steihwat is the official piano of The Cuetis Institute of Music 



Orchestra Fersonnel 



First Violins 

Iso Briselli 
Jacob Brodsky 
David Cohen 
Philip Frank 
Paul Gcrshman 
Gama Gilbert 
Max Goberman 
Celia Gomberg 
Carmela Ippolito 
Robert Levine 
Anita Malkin 
Lily Matison 
George Pepper 
Ruth Perssion 
Judith Poska 
Jay Savitt 
Benjamin Sharlip 
Henry Siegl 
Meyer Simkin 
Ethel Stark 
Ladislaus Steinhardt 
Frederick Werner 

Second Violins 

James Bloom 
Abe Burg 
Maurice Cramer 
Thaddeus Dyczkowskl 
Robert Gomberg 
Laura GrifEng 
Marian Head 
Charles Jaffe 
Jack Kash 
Nathan Snader 
Herbert Sokolove 
Eva Stark 
James Vandersall 
Frances Wiener 
Garry White 
Lcona Wolson 
Eva Young 
Clara Zager 

Violas 

Max Aronoff 
Simon Asin 
Paull Ferguson 
Leon Frengut 
Sam Goldblum 
Esther Hare 
Margaret Hayes 
Sheppard LehnhofF 
Leonard Mogill 
Herbert Van den Burg 



Violoncellos 

Adine Barozzi 
Orlando Cole 
Katherine Conant 
Stephen Deak 
Tibor de Machula 
Samuel Gcschichter 
John Gray 
Josephine Herrick 
Frank Miller 
Harry Neeter 
Brunetta Peterson 
Florence Williams 

Basses 

•Anton Torello 
Frank Eney 
Harold Garratt 
Sigmund Hering 
Jack Posell 
Irven Whitenack 
Oscar Zimmerman 



Harps 

William Cameron 
Victoria Murdock 
Edna Phillips 
Floraine Stetler 



Flutes 

Maurice Sharp 
George Drexler 
John Hreachmack 
Richard Townsend 

Oboes 

Robert Bloom 
Sidney Divinsky 
Robert Hester 



Clarinets 

Robert McGinnis 
James Collis 
Leon Lester 
Felix Meyer 



Bassoons 

William Polisi 
Frank Ruggieri 
Ervin Swenson 



Horns 

•Anton Horner 
Harry Berv 
Luke del Negro 
Attillio de Palma 
Sune Johnson 
Theodore Seder 
James Thurmond 
Henry Whitehead 



Trumpets 

•Sol Cohen 
Charles Barnes 
John Harmaala 
Melvin Headman 
John Schuler 



Trombones 

•Gardcll Simons 
Guy Boswell 
John Coffey 
Gerald Woerner 



Tuba 

•Philip Donatelli 

Tympani 
Frank Schwart? 

Battery 

Samuel Krauss 
Salvatore Pcrrone 
Frank Sinatra 

Librarian 
Charles N. Demarest 



•Member of the faculty of The Curtis Institutb of Music 



Local Management: W. H. Brennan and G. E. Judd 

Concert Manager for The Curtis Institute of Music: Richard Copley. 

10 East 43rd Street, New York 




The Curtis Institute of Music 

Josef Hofmann, Director 

THE CURTIS ORCHESTRA 

Con^ucfor: EMIL MLYNARSKI 

Soloisfs: ARTIST STUDENTS 

TIBOR DE MACHULA, Violoncellist 

JUDITH POSSA, Violinist 

TATIANA DE SANZEWITCH, Pianist 



Tuesday Evening, April 29, 1930 

at S:20 o'c\oc\ 



THE ACADEMY OF MUSIC 

PHILADELPHIA 



The Curtis Orchestra, composed of one hundred 
one students of The Curtis Institute of Music, 
is augmented for this occasion b^j seven professionals, 
five of whom are facuhy members of the Institute. 



■§^1 



PROGRAMME 

Richard Wagner Vorspiel und Liebestod from 

"Tristan und Isolde" 
Johannes Br.ahms Double Concerto in A minor, 

for Violin and Violoncello 
with Orchestra 

Allegro 

Andante 

Vivace non tropro 

RiCH.\RD Str.\uss SjTnphonic Tone-Poem — "Don Juan" 

INTERMISSION 

CeS.'^R Fr.\NCK SjTnphonic Variations for Piano and Orchestra 

Ffjedrich Smetana Overture to 'The Bartered Bride" 



Orchestra Personnel 



First Violins 

Iso Briselli 
Jacob Brodsky 
David Cohen 
Philip Frank 
Paul Gershman 
Gama Gilbert 
Max Goberman 
Celia Gomberg 
Carmela Ippolito 
Robert Levine 
Anita Malkin 
Lily Matison 
George Pepper 
Ruth Perssion 
Judith Poska 
Jay Savitt 
Benjamin Sharlip 
Henry Siegl 
Meyer Simkin 
Ethel Stark 
Ladislaus Steinhardt 
Frederick Werner 



Second Violins 

James Bloom 
Abe Burg 
Maurice Cramer 
Thaddeus Dyczkowski 
Robert Gomberg 
Laura Griffing 
Marian Head 
Charles Jaffe 
Jack Kash 
Nathan Snader 
Herbert Sokolove 
Eva Stark 
James Vandersall 
Frances Wiener 
Leona Wolson 
Eva Young 
Clara Zager 

Violas 

Max Aronoff 
Simon Asin 
Paull Ferguson 
Leon Frengut 
Sam Goldblum 
Esther Hare 
Margaret Hayes 
Sheppard Lehnhoff 
Leonard Mogill 



Violoncellos 

Adine Barozzi 
Orlando Cole 
Katherine Conant 
Stephen Deak 
Tibor de Machula 
Samuel Geschichter 
John Gray 
Josephine Herrick 
Frank Miller 
Harry Neeter 
Brunetta Peterson 
Florence Williams 



Basses 

•Anton Torello 
Frank Eney 
Harold Garratt 
Jack Posell 
Irven Whitenack 
Oscar Zimmerman 

Harps 

William Cameron 
Victoria Murdock 
Edna Phillips 
Floraine Stetler 

Flutes 

Maurice Sharp 
George Drexler 

John Hreachmack 
Richard Townsend 



Oboes 

Robert Bloom 
Sidney Divinsky 
Robert Hester 

Clarinets 

Robert McGinnis 
James Collis 
Leon Lester 
Felix Meyer 



Bassoons 

William Polisi 
Frank Ruggieri 
Ervin Swenson 



Horns 

•Anton Horner 
Harry Berv 
Luke del Negro 
Attillio de Palma 
Sune Johnson 
Theodore Seder 
James Thurmond 
Henry Whitehead 



Trumpets 

•Sol Cohen 
Charles Barnes 
John Harmaala 
Melvin Headman 
John Schuler 



Trombones 

•Gardell Simons 
Guy Boswell 
John Coffey 
Gerald Woerner 



Tuba 

•Philip Donatelli 

Tympani 

Frank Schwartz 



Battery 

Samuel Krauss 
Salvatore Perrone 
Frank Sinatra 



Librarian 

Charles N. Demarest 



•Member of the faculty of The Curtis Institute of Music 



(5^ ^^ 



THE PENNSYLVANIA MUSEUM 
AT F.AIRMOUNT 



19294930 



A Series ov Concerts of 
Chamber Music 



by ArtisT'Students 

of 

The Curtis Institute of Music 

These Concerts Are Under the Direction of Mr. Louis Bailly 
Head of the Department of Chamber Music 

First Concert 

Sunday Evening, T^ovemher 10, 1929 
at 8:15 o'chc\ 



SWASTIKA QUARTET 

Gama Gilbert ^ v r ^'^ Akq-soff, Viola 

Benjamin Sh.^^rlip ) Orxando Cole, Violoncello 

Assisted by Joseph Le\ine, Pianist 



<f^ ^'^^ 



Programme 

I. LuDWiG VAN Beethoven. String Quartet in E flat major, Opus 74 

(Harfenquartett) 

Poco adagio — Allegro 

Adagio ma non troppo 

Presto 

Allegretto con variazioni 

Note: Ludwig van Beethoven (1770'1827) ranks among the immortal 
geniuses in musical composition. The greater part of his life was passed 
in Vienna where he was the admired favorite of the aristocratic musical 
circles. Erratic in his conduct, ungovernable in temper, almost totally deaf 
in the latter part of his life, he surrendered himself more and more to the 
contemplation of his inner life and of nature and its expression in his music. 
Nine great symphonies, an opera ("FideHo"), songs, pianoforte sonatas, trios, 
and sixteen quartets are superb examples of his astounding creative powers. 
The quartets (1800- 1826) may be considered as belonging to three periods 
of Beethoven's development. Of these, the first period is characterized by 
a close following of the acknowledged laws of quartet composition and the 
models of classical style such as the works of Mozart and Haydn. The second 
period is that in which as a mature man, conscious of his own power, he 
dares to express his own individuality, with increasing freedom from arbitrary 
rules, while in the third he transcends all rigid bonds of musical form, and 
attempts to express his intellectual and philosophical life and convictions 
through great originality in themes and an untrammeled inspiration in develop' 
ing them in musical form. 

The Harfen, or "Harp" Quartet, is so called because in it Beethoven has 
reproduced the effect of an harp by means of pizzicati arpeggios played by 
all the instruments of the quartet. Such an idea was a complete novelty to 
the audiences of Beethoven's time, and naturally created a sensation. The 
quartet marks the close of a period of strife and unrest in the composer's 
life and expresses a reawakening of his spirit in sheer delight of creation. 
The adagio movement is especially beautiful, a song with variations, sung by 
the first violin against a very rich contrapuntal accompaniment by the other 
instruments. It points clearly, in style and structure, to the beginning of 
Beethoven's third and most fully developed and characteristic style. 

The scherzo and finale, by way of another innovation on the composer's 
part are combined into one movement instead of the conventional two. The 
gaiety of the second part of this double movement with its brilliant varia- 
tions gives the impression that the four instruments are four voices of as many 
persons conversing together: as question and answer, story and comment 
follow each other. One may picture to himself any background he pleases 
but perhaps the master had in mind some tavern scene where four congenial 
spirits meet for pleasant association, talking, laughing, drinking, smoking 
together. 

Such, at least, is the impression left by the joyous spirit of the charm- 
ingly simple yet piquant song theme with which the genius of Beethoven 
plays, turning it to this side and to that as one might some brilliant gem, 
that all the facets may be illuminated and the full beauty of its colour and 
light be evident. 



CJ^ c^ 



d^ eS^ 



Programme 

II. Louis Nicholas Clerambault Sonata in E minor, for Two 

Violins and Piano 
(La Magnifique) 
Symphonic 
Allegro 
Adagio 
Sarabande 
Gigue 
Allegro 

Benjamin Sharlip, VioMn Gama Gilbert, VioUn 
Joseph Levine, ^ia-no 

Note: Louis Nicholas Clerambault (1676-1749) was the son of a 
violinist attached to the French Court at St. Germain en Laye in the latter 
part of the 17th century, and must thus have been from early childhood 
accustomed to a musical atmosphere as well as to the environment of the 
Court. He appears in 1702 as the composer of a book of "Pieces for the 
Clavecin" and later as "commissioned to publish vocal and instrumental music 
'including sonatas' " which in the I7th century were so much the vogue that 
practically every musician was composing in that form. Clerambault was no 
exception to the rule, and as organist at two important churches, one at St. 
Cyr and the other in Paris, published numerous collections of Cantatas, many 
of them composed for Court or Church functions. Daquin refers to the 
"famous organist Clerambault" and the composer himself mentions with pride 
the fact that Louis XIV had greatly appreciated certain of his "Cantatas" 
when performed at Court. Mme. de Maintenon as well as Mme. de Pompa- 
dour were interested in Clerambault and attended some of the performances 
of his works. "From which," says a writer of the times, in rather equivocal 
fashion, "every one went away well pleased." 

The violin sonatas left by Clerambault are preserved in the National 
Library in Paris in manuscript and belong, probably, to the first years of the 
18th century. There are seven in all, including a "Simphonia." Each one 
bears a title such as "La Felicite," "L'Abondance," "L'Impromptu," and so 
on. "La Magnifique" is the seventh in the collection, and, with numbers one 
and two, is in trio form with two basses. The other sonatas have but one 
bass. In type they are related to the form used by Corelli, having a variable 
number of movements, four to six, written in the key of sol on the first line. 
Commencing with a slow movement, they invariably end in an allegro or 
gigue, but "L'Impromptu" and "La Magnifique" contain two succeeding 
movements in slow or tranquil tempo. The final allegro is almost always in 
fugue form which the composer handles with great cleverness. The compo- 
sitions of Clerambault are interesting and, at their best, charming examples of 
composition for string instruments of the early 18th century. 



d^ H^ 



d^— «^ 

Programme 

III. Hugo Wolf. Italian Serenade for String Quartet (in one movement) 

Hugo Wolf (1860-1903) was born in the small town of Windischgraz in Styria, Austria, 
and spent practically all his life in or near Vienna. His father had musical tastes and gave 
Hugo his first instruction in violin and piano playing. After various unfortunate experiences 
in different schools it was decided that the boy's passion for music must be allowed to develop, 
and he was in 1875 entered in the Conservatory of Vienna. Here he remained two years 
only, for such an independent spirit as Hugo Wolf apparently could find no resting place or 
satisfaction in any of the schools, or with any of the teachers with whom he came in contact. 
It was obvious that the gifted but "difficult" boy must work out his own salvation. This he 
proceeded to do in direst poverty amid disappointments. He studied incessantly, gave lessons 
and was for some time musical critic for one of the Viennese papers. 

In many ways Wolf's career may be considered the modern parallel of Franz Schubert's. 
Both were Viennese, both were master song writers, both lived in poverty and without any 
adequate appreciation of their work, and both died miserably. Wolf developed into a fine, but 
not a superlative pianist, and it was in 1878 that he began to realize that his particular bent 
lay in writing songs. He had a very extraordinarily keen sense of the poetic values of words 
and of the rhythm of verse and was a most impressive reader of poetry. His method, later 
in life, was to read aloud the poems he had set to music, while he accompanied himself on 
the piano, indicating in an astonishing performance of the accompaniment, the colour and the 
imaginative suggestion he wished the words of the poem to acquire when sung. He developed 
another idea also, which was to compose settings in sequence for numbers of poems of the 
same author, steeping himself so deeply in the spirit, style and meaning of the writer that 
he was for the time being translated into the creations of the poet. Thus we have long series 
of songs to words by Goethe, Moericke, Heyse, Michel Angelo and other standard poets. 

Wolf's extraordinary gifts as a song writer were so far in advance of the taste of his day 
that even yet his work has not met its full appreciation. Five choral works, of which the 
Feuerreiter and Elfenlied are the finest, an opera and hundreds of songs attest his fertility ot 
musical expression. When he composed, he was like one possessed of a demon, and often two 
magnificent songs were completed in one day. 

Of a highly sensitive and overstrung nervous temperament, heightened, doubtless, by the 
terrible hardships and struggles of his early life, Wolf finally suffered a complete nervous 
collapse and spent the last four years of his life in an asylum near Vienna, cared for by 
friends and the "Hugo Wolf Verein" which had been founded to further an appreciation 
of his work and to aid the composer. In all the tragic annals of the lives of great musicians 
none can be found more heart breaking than the story of Hugo Wolf. 

The Italian Serenade was written in 1886 and must not be confused with the "Italian 
Serenade for small orchestra," using some of the same themes, which was written four years 
later. In this delightful and unique tour de force. Wolf has combined the purity and elegance 
of the Mozartian style with the romantic spirit of Schubert. So entirely has he compre- 
hended the Italian temperament, so avidly has he reproduced the colour and atmosphere of an 
Italian episode, that it would be impossible to find in all musical literature of short compositions 
for string quartet any other work so sparkling, so picturesque or so poetic. It is a gift to 
the world from the hand of a musical genius. 

IV. Cesar FhANCK. Quintet in F minor, for Piano and String Quartet 

Molto moderato quasi lento — Allegro 
Lento, con molto sentimento 
Allegro non troppo, ma con fuoco 

Cesar Franck (1822-1890), a native of Liege, was by birth a Walloon or South Belgian, 
yet he is rightly regarded as a French composer who rehabilitated French music after a dark 
night lasting at least a century. He very early manifested decided musical talent and was 
admitted to the Conservatory in Paris in 1837, where he studied composition and the piano. 

The real career of Franck began in 1858 when he became Maitre de Chapelle at the 
Church of Ste. Clothilde in Paris. From that date to 1872 nearly all his compositions were 
designed for use in the Church. He poured forth a wonderful succession of masses, motets, 
symphonic pieces and compositions for the organ, sacred songs to Latin words and the like. Not 
since the time of Bach had the organ been so enriched with masterpieces. His immense 
service consists in having stood out for "pure music," especially in the symphony and chamber 
music. 

The Quintet in F minor may be considered as in all respects typical of the Latin tempera- 
ment, and does not exhibit the later tendencies of Franck in what may be called his ecclesi- 
astical style. In this composition he has combined the violins into one voice, the viola and 
'cello into a second, and united the two with the piano in an effect of great solidarity and 
richness entirely orchestral in effect and not in the strictest adherence to the accepted con- 
ventions of chamber music structure. Particularly is this true in the finale whose brilliancy 
and passion electrify the listener so that he is carried away by the irresistible effects produced, 
and willingly allows himself to disregard the fact that the composer has wandered far from 
the style of pure chamber music. 



The next concert will he given on December IS, J 929 

The piano is a Steinway 
d^ — ^^ 



c5^.^ ^^ 



THE PENNSYLVANIA MUSEUM 
AT FAIRMOUNT 

19294930 



A Series of Concerts of 
Chamber Music 



hy Artist'Students 

of 

The Curtis Institute of Music 



These Concerts Are Under the Direction of Mr. Louis Bailly 
Head of the Department of Chamber Music 



Second Concert 

Sunday Evening, December 15, 1929 
at 8:15 o'chc\ 



The piano is a Steinway 

(S^. ^ 



d^ ^^^ 

Frogramme 

I. JeAN'PhILIPPE RaMEAU. . .From Concerts for Three Violins, Viola, 

Violoncello and Double Bass 

Le Vezinet 
La Boucon 
Menuet in G major 
La Timide 
Tambourins 

Judith Poska "| Paull Ferguson, Viola 

Lois Putlitz r Violins Frank Miller, Violoncello 

Carmela Ippolito ) Jack Posell, Double Bass 

Note: Jean-Philippe Rameau (1683-1764) was the son of an organist of 
Dijon, and from earliest age exhibited brilliant gifts as a musician — but 
strangely enough reached the age of 40 years before his extraordinary 
abilities found any public appreciation. From youth he made a profound 
study of the analysis and construction of musical composition, and through 
twenty years of service as organist in various situations, continued his lonely 
researches. As organist of the Cathedral at Clermont-Ferrand, an isolated 
town of central France, he had time to devote to the preparation and comple- 
tion of a monumental and epoch-making work, which was published in Paris 
in 1722. In this "Treatise on Harmony," Rameau systematized and explained 
the rules and laws of musical harmony and discovered and described the laws 
of the inversion of chords. The publication of such a work naturally created 
a profound sensation and placed Rameau in a prominent position musically. 

He removed to Paris where, owing to his fame as a theorist, he found him- 
self well received. For a time things went well, but when, at the age of fifty, 
after some minor attempts at light comic operatic forms, his full powers as an 
original and powerful composer burst forth in the production of his operas 
Hippolyte and Aricee, Les Indes Galantes, Castor and Pollux, Dardanus, and 
several others, a powerful cabal of writers and musicians began to belittle 
and attack their dangerous rival. The result was to close the opera to 
Rameau's work for a long period, and on the other hand to turn the com- 
poser's attention to other forms of music such as his "Suites de pieces en con- 
certs" for violin, flute and harpsichord, which are played today in the form of 
string sextet, arranged by Saint-Saens. 

Rameau was accused during his lifetime of "putting too much" music 
into his operas — a criticism which marks the transition from the artificiality 
of most operatic works preceding him, to the attempt, as Rameau himself says 
"to throw himself into all the characters he depicts" and again "to seek as a 
musician to study nature before painting her and then be able to choose colors 
and shades, the relation of which with the required expressions is borne in 
upon him by his judgment and taste." "Nature," says he, "has not entirely 
denied me her gifts, and I have not devoted myself to combinations of notes 
to the extent of forgetting their intimate connection with natural beauty." 

Rameau was an exact contemporary of Handel and their styles are simi- 
lar — in a mastery of recitative, the introduction of "little symphonies" into 
longer works, grandiose and impressive tonal effects, vitality of conception and 
the expression of human emotion. 



(5^^ H^ 



Programme 

II. Johannes Brahms Two Songs with accompaniment of 

Viola and Piano, Opus 91 
Gestillte Sehnsucht 
Geistliches Wiegenlied 

Josephine Jirak, Contralto 
Max Aronoff, Viola Florence Frantz, Piano 

Note: Johannes Brahms (born in Hamburg, 1833 — died in Vienna, 
1897) spent the greater part of his Hfe in Vienna. His original genius and 
his unswerving devotion to his own personal ideals set him apart from the 
older school of composers, of which Beethoven was the consummation, as well 
as from the "Romanticists," led by Schumann, the dramatic ideas of Wagner, 
and the sensational descriptive school of Berlioz, Liszt, and other contempo- 
raries. During his whole life Brahms was a storm center of criticism and 
discussion, but today a fuller appreciation of the nobility and majesty of his 
conceptions, and an understanding of his very original style have replaced the 
old hostility. Four great symphonies, many songs, choral works, chamber music 
in various forms, as well as numerous compositions for the pianoforte (for 
Brahms was in early life a professional pianist) are the fruit of incessant work 
during 64 years of his life. 

Folksong was the inexhaustible spring from which he drew inspiration, 
developing and embellishing it with all the technical means of which he was 
a master, and colouring it with his own peculiar personal style. 

The two songs. Opus 91, were pubhshed in 1884, and are exceptionally 
interesting and beautiful examples of Brahms' genius in a field of composition 
which has been comparatively neglected: namely, that of voice with varied 
light instrumental accompaniment. The viola and the contralto voice constitute 
a most sympathetic combination as to tone color, and in both songs the human 
emotion is usually prominent. 

"Gestillte Sehnsucht" opens with a twelvcbar introduction by viola and 
piano, after which the voice enters independently, the viola resuming its 
former motive which is next assumed by the voice to a florid viola accom- 
paniment. The song then changes to the minor with rich contrasts of effect 
until the finale. 

"Geistliches Wiegenlied" was written as a congratulatory gift from 
Brahms to Frau Joachim (wife of the great violinist and herself a singer) 
upon the birth of her first child. The viola part possesses an independent 
interest, as it is an old traditional tune associated with the subject of the 
song. The words of the old song run as follows: (translation) 

"Joseph, dearest Joseph mine. 
Help me hush the child divine, 
Thy reward is God's design 
In Kingdom of the Virgin's Son, 
Maria, Maria." 

This traditional tune given to the viola serves as the basis for contra- 
puntal development by the voice and piano throughout the entire song, which 
with its calm beauty is singularly fitted to express the Christmas spirit. 



d^ «^ 



d^ ^ 

Frogramme 

III. LUDWIG VAN Beethoven Septet in E flat major, Opus 20, 

for Violin, Viola, Violoncello, 
Double Bass, Clarinet, Bassoon, 
and Horn 
Adagio — Allegro con brio 
Adagio cantabile 
Tempo di Menuetto 
Tema con Variazioni — Andante 
Scherzo — Allegro molto e vivace 
Andante con molto alia marcia — Presto 
Leonid Bolotine, Violin Jack Posell, Double Bass 

Leon Frengut, Viola James Collis, Clarinet 

TiBOR DE Machula, Violoncello Frank Ruggieri, Bassoon 

Henry Whitehead, Horn 

Note: Ludwig van Beethoven (1770-1827) ranks among the immortal 
geniuses in musical composition. The greater part of his life was passed 
in Vienna where he was the admired favorite of the aristocratic musical 
circles. Erratic in his conduct, ungovernable in temper, almost totally deaf 
in the latter part of his life, he surrendered himself more and more to the 
contemplation of his inner life and of nature and its expression in his music. 
Nine great symphonies, an opera ("Fidelio"), songs, pianoforte sonatas, trios, 
and sixteen quartets are superb examples of his astounding creative powers. 
The quartets (1800-1826) may be considered as belonging to three periods 
of Beethoven's development. Of these, the first period is characterized by 
a close following of the acknowledged laws of quartet composition and the 
models of classical style such as the works of Mozart and Haydn. The second 
period is that in which, as a mature man, conscious of his own power, he 
dares to express his own individuality, with increasing freedom from arbitrary 
rules, while in the third he transcends all rigid bonds of musical form, and 
attempts to express his intellectual and philosophical life and convictions 
through great originality in themes and an untrammeled inspiration in develop' 
ing them in musical form. 

The Septet, composed at the end of the 18th century, was first performed 
in April, 1800, at Beethoven's opening concert before the Court in Vienna. 
On that occasion the program was made up of the first performance of the 
First Symphony; of the Septet, and a piano concerto played by Beethoven 
himself. 

The Septet received an instantaneous and hearty appreciation and is today 
judged to be one of the finest of the early works of the composer. It marks 
the end of the experiments Beethoven had been carrying on in combinations 
of wind and string instruments for chamber music. Henceforward, for thir- 
teen years the piano will cease to have any part in the chamber music 
compositions, and Beethoven will begin his marvelous series of orchestral 
symphonic works. Throughout the experiments in writing trios, quartets, 
quintets and sextets Beethoven had been seeking to get an evenly developed 
ensemble in which the string and wind instruments should be carefully 
balanced. The Septet presents his solution of the problem; thus the violin, 
needing the partnership of some wind instrument akin to it in quality of tone 
and flexibihty of utterance, receives the clarinet as a partner; the 'cello and 
viola are mated to bassoon and horn, while the double bass provides the secure 
harmonious basis for the whole. This arrangement allows each instrument to 
develop its full individual capacity and also permits a contrasting choral effect 
that is really orchestral. The work may, in fact, be considered in the light 
of being a precursor of the orchestral symphonies and is filled with the cour' 
age and pride of a rising genius, now thirty years of age, who feels secure of 
his powers and confidently presses forward along unbeaten paths into new 
and unexplored fields of musical expression. 



The next concert will he given on January 26, J 930 
d^ ^ ^^ 



d^— '<;^ 

THE PENNSYLVANIA MUSEUM 
AT FAIRMOUNT 

19294930 

Second Season of 
Chamber Music Concerts 

b}' Artist'Students 

of 

The Curtis Institute of Music 

These Concerts Are Under the Direction of Mr. Louis Bailly 
Head of the Department of Chamber Music 

Third Concert 
Sunday Evening, January 26, 1930 

at 8: IS o'cloc\ 

SWASTIKA QUARTET 

Gama Gilbert ) Max Aronoff, Viola 

Benjamin Sharlip ) ''' '"^ Orlando Cole, Violoncello 

Assisted by 

Florence Frantz, Piano 
Leon Frengut, Viola James Collis, Clarinet 



The Piano is a Steinway 



d^ '^ 



Programme 

I. Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart . . String Quintet in C minor, Kochel 

No. 406, for Two Violins, Two 
Violas and Violoncello 

Allegro 

Andante 

Menuetto in canone 

Allegro 

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (born in Salzburg, 1756 — died in Vienna, 
1791) was one of the most instinctive musical geniuses of all time. His 
precocity was phenomenal, so that at five he was playing in public and com- 
posing, progressing so rapidly that at ten he was able to play at sight almost 
anything then written for clavier or violin and already composing for chorus 
and orchestra. Throughout his life in demand as a pianist and receiving 
admiration and applause for his compositions, he was, nevertheless, often in 
straitened circumstances. He died at the age of 35, involved in a tangle of 
sordid cares, and was buried in a common grave of the city's paupers in 
Vienna. 

In spite of the brevity of his life, his achievements were colossal and his 
genius was the consummate flower of the classical period. He was one of 
the most accomplished keyboard performers of the time and was equally 
expert upon the viohn and the viola (for which he had a special liking). His 
600 works represent all forms of composition: operas, oratorios, cantatas, 
church music, orchestral works (including 49 symphonies and 25 concertos), 
chamber music (including 9 string quintets, 26 string quartets, 7 piano trios, 
42 violin sonatas), and keyboard works (piano sonatas, organ sonatas, etc.). 

The year 1782 was an eventful one in Mozart's life. It marked his 
emancipation of himself artistically; was the year of his marriage; of his first 
success with an opera, "Entfiihrung aus dem Serail"; of his meeting with 
Joseph Haydn from whom he learned much; and in general, was a year marked 
by great musical productivity. Among the numerous beautiful compositions of 
this date there was a "Serenade for Wind Instruments." Whether Mozart felt 
that the performance of this delightful work would be rendered infrequent 
(as it is) owing to the difficulties of assembling wind instrument performers, 
or whether he felt that the material in the composition was worthy of a second 
and different scoring (which is certainly true), is not known, but at any rate, 
rewrite the Serenade he did, in the form of the Quintet for two violins, two 
violas, and violoncello, changing the musical content very little. In some 
respects the peculiar piquancy of the wind instrument quality of tone is 
missing in the string quintet variant of the themes, but if we listen to this 
quintet, with ears unprejudiced by the unique quality of the original scoring, 
we cannot fail to be impressed with the purity of style, fertility of imagination 
and elegance of conception of this composition. 

The first movement, dignified and impressive, but not heavy, is followed 
by the Andante, which is as tender, as exquisite, and pure as a flower of spring. 
The third movement, constructed in imitation of canonic form, is written in 
a spirit of fantasy, dressed in a garment of involved, yet delicate counterpoint, 
in the gayest of spirit; while the last movement, taking a very simple theme, 
presents it in a series of variations, grave and gay, simple and elaborate, so full 
of charm and vitality, that none but the greatest master could have conceived 
them. We may think of this whole composition as a perfect carving in clearest 
crystal, every line full of grace; mathematically correct in proportion, untouched 
by spot or stain of human passion — the expression of purest music from the 
mind of a divine genius. 



d^ ^<^ 



.c<^ 



Programme 



v5^ 

II. Serge Prokofieff Overture on Hebrew/Themes, Opus 34, 

for String Quartet, Clarinet and Piano 

Serge Prokofieff (born in 1891) is a native of South Russia, and a 
graduate, with highest honors, from the St. Petersburg Conservatory. Thor- 
oughly equipped as a composer, pianist, and conductor, he is best known as 
a pianist whose technique is as remarkable as his style and compositions are 
original. An opera, "The Love of the Three Oranges," was first produced in 
Chicago, also later in New York, and in excerpts for the concert program has 
been played by various large orchestras. Prokofieff is a leader in the new 
musical thought; original, daring, full of life and power and he does not fear 
to overstep conservative rules of harmony and counterpoint. 

The "Ouverture sur des Themes Juifs," Opus 34, is dated 1919. Without 
ado the composer introduces a theme which is a direct transcript of a Jewish 
popular song, so old, so traditional, that its history and origin are lost in 
antiquity. With an oriental treatment by accompanying instruments, the 
clarinet, whose quality of tone is preeminently fitted to produce and preserve 
the atmosphere, introduces this air, which reappears at frequent inter\'als and 
in various guises up to the whirlwind climax of the piece. 

The popular note of this theme is succeeded by a very beautiful and 
typical one of religious character, which is played by the violoncello. The 
dignity and searching melancholy of this hymn, for that is what it really is, 
seem to complete the picture which Prokofieff is painting of the deep religious 
life of the Hebrew in contrast with the life of the streets and of the bazaar. 
We hear the chant gradually fading away, to descending chords in the piano 
score, which resemble bells tinkling in the distance and becoming less and less 
distinct, as the whirling, turning, round of the street theme returns with insist' 
ence and ever increasing rapidity of utterance. The freshness, originality, 
directness and vigor of this composition and its clever scoring, create a vivid 
and charming impression full of picturesque and striking effects. 



(^ c^ 



d^ r^ 



Programme 

III. Johannes Brahms Quintet in F minor. Opus 34, for 

String Quartet and Piano 
i^llegro non troppo 
i^ndante, un poco adagio 
Scherzo 
Fiha^e (Poco sostenuto) — Allegro non troppo 

Johannes Brahms (born in Hamburg 183 3 — died in Vienna 1897) spent 
the greater part of his life in Vienna. His original genius and his unswerving 
devotion to his own personal ideals set him apart from the older school of 
composers, of which Beethoven was the consummation, as well as from the 
"Romanticists," led by Schumann, the dramatic ideas of Wagner, and the 
sensational descriptive school of Berlioz, Liszt, and other contemporaries. Dur' 
ing his whole life Brahms was a storm center of criticism and discussion, but 
today a fuller appreciation of the nobility and majesty of his conceptions, 
and an understanding of his very original style have replaced the old hos' 
tility. Four great symphonies, many songs, choral works, chamber music in 
various forms, as well as numerous compositions for the pianoforte (for 
Brahms was in early life a professional pianist) are the fruit of incessant work 
during 64 years of his life. 

The Piano Quintet in F minor was written originally as a string quintet 
and subsequently rewritten for two pianos. Although no less distinguished 
artists than the great pianist Tausig and Brahms himself joined in a public 
performance of the two-piano version of this work, in 1864, it met with no 
success, and the composer rewrote it in the present form. From the moment 
when the work opens with the broad, majestic flowing announcement of the 
first theme, through the exultation of the first movement with its great choral 
effect, so characteristic of Brahms; through the tenderness of the second move 
ment, at times resembling a lullaby; through the scherzo of the third movement 
with its staccato passages rising in a triumphant chorus-like passage, to the 
overwhelming finale, the composer's inspiration never for a moment fails him. 

Nothing that Brahms has written is more characteristic of his style, of his 
power of producing new and grander effects from material already used, which 
the hearer may have thought exhausted of possibilities of further development 
and power. This work is to be classed as one of the greatest of chamber music 
works for piano and strings, in respect to its grandeur of proportion, impetu' 
osity and deep pathos, unusual fertility of ideas and the supreme power of 
the composer in handling and building up his material into a solid, well' 
proportioned and magnificent whole. 



The next concert luill be given on March 2, 1930 



d^ c<^ 



THE PENNSYLVANIA MUSEUM OF ART 

19294930 

Second Season of 
Chamber Music Concerts 

b}! Artist-Students 

of 

The Curtis Institute of Music 



These Concerts Are Under the Direction of Mr. Louis Bailly 
Head of the Department of Chamber Music 



Fourth Concert 
Sunday Eveyiing, March 2, 1930 

at 8:1 S o'clock 

CASIMIR QUARTET 

Leonid Bolotine ] Leon Frengut, Viola 

Paul Gershman ) ^° Tibor de Machula, Violoncello 



SWASTIKA QUARTET 
Gama Gilbert ) Max Aronoff, Viola 

Benjamin Sharlip j ^'°''"^ Orlando Cole, Violoncello 

and 

Maurice Sharp, flute 



The Piano is a Steinway 

d^ ^p^ 



Programme 

I. Peter I. Tschaikowsky String Quartet in D major, Opus 11 

Moderate e semplice 

Andante cantabile 

Scherzo — Allegro non tanto e con fuoco 

Finale — Allegro giusto 

The Casimir Quartet 

After a desultory and not especially musical education, Tschaikowsky at a suitable age 
entered the School of Jurisprudence at St. Petersburg, and was fully twenty-one years of age 
before the serious thought of making music a career was entertained. During his years of 
study of the law, he was thrown with musical amateurs and professionals, and became a fairly 
good pianist. The St. Petersburg Conservatory under the direction of Anton Rubinstein 
opened to the young student an opportunity for intense study and was the first strong in' 
fluence in the artistic life of the future composer. Study of the piano with Rubinstein, com' 
position with Laroche, and of the flute in order to help out in the Conservatory orchestra, 
prepared Tschaikowsky for his life work. 

In 1866 he received an appointment as Professor of Harmony at the Conservatory of 
Moscow then under the directorship of Nicholas Rubinstein, brother of Anton. So great 
were the interest and friendship of the new Director that he insisted upon Tschaikowsky's 
living with him in Moscow, an arrangement which continued for a number of years. 
Tschaikowsky thus was introduced to a brilliant coterie of musicians, scientists and literary 
men, whose companionship could not fail to broaden the mind and inspire the genius of the 
young professor. He began at once to compose serious and ambitious pieces, two quartets, 
an overture "Romeo and Juliette" and an opera followed one another with gradually increasing 
successes. 

Tschaikowsky even as a child had been subject to attacks of extreme nervousness, and as 
he grew older he became the prey of periods of great physical and mental depression which 
increased with the responsibilities of his career as a teacher and composer. A strange and 
unfortunate marriage brought him to the verge of insanity, when in his dire need, a rich 
Russian widow by the name of Madame von Meek came to his rescue with the offer of six 
hundred rubles annually, in order to permit the composer to work unhampered by material 
cares. For thirteen years this arrangement was continued, during which time Madame von 
Meek and her protege exchanged an immense number of most interesting letters, but never 
once spoke together nor met except upon one occasion when they happened to be present at 
the same concert. In one of the letters, the composer writes "You ask me how I manage my 
instrumentation ... I invent the musical idea and the instrumentation simultaneously . . . 
As regards the Russian element in my works, I may tell you that not infrequently I begin a 
composition with the intention of introducing some folk melody . . . As to this national 
element in my work ... it proceeds from . . . having from my earliest years been im- 
pregnated with the characteristic beauty of our Russian folk songs ... In a word I am 
Russian in the fullest sense of the word." At the time of the beginning of this singular 
friendship with Madame von Meek, Tschaikowsky was thinking over his Fourth Symphony 
which he dedicated to her as "My best friend." 

From now on the fame of the composer became more and more secure and began to 
spread to other European capitals. An opera, "Eugen Oniegin" and two more symphonies, 
with numerous smaller works, "Pique Dame," "Casse noisette," et cetera, followed. 
Tschaikowsky made several European tours and in 1891 was invited to New York to conduct 
some of his works at the opening of Carnegie Hall. Two years later, arriving in St. Peters- 
burg to attend the first performance of his Sixth or "Pathetic" Symphony, he fell a victim to 
the prevailing cholera epidemic and died in the arms of his favorite brother, Modeste, to whom 
the world owes a most interesting account of the career and works of this truly Russian 
composer. 

The Quartet, Opus 11, was written in 1871 and had an immediate success. The work is 
dedicated to an intimate scientific and musical friend in Moscow, Rochinsky by name, who 
said regarding the dedication, "I have received a brevet of immortality." The work creates 
at once an atmosphere of languid melancholy, very oriental in type, strange in its rhythmical 
as well as its melodic line, increasingly polyphonic in effect with the introduction of a second 
theme carried side by side to a magnificent climax — a favorite device of the composer. 

The famous and beautiful Andante is based upon a Russian folk song noted by Tschaikow- 
sky while visiting in the country in 1869, from the singing of a gardener at work beneath 
his windows. It is so familiar that it is useless to dilate upon its beauty, as fresh and 
deeply moving in its fluent melody after half a century of familiarity as it was in its first 
hearing. "Never in the course of my life" wrote Tschaikowsky in his diary, "did I feel so 
flattered, never so proud of my creative power, as when Leo Tolstoi, sitting by my side, 
listened to my Andante while the tears streamed down his face." Not only does this move' 
ment characterize the soul of the Russian people, but it goes even deeper into the well spring 
of melody, whose origin is as yet untraced to its fountain source in the heart of the Eastern 
peoples. 

The Scherzo, by its virility in rhythm, recalls the popular Moujik dance, with a touch of 
syncopation in the struggle of the rhythm of two against three beats. 

The Finale is the least inspired of the movements and not so happy in its choice of 
themes, but its "Allegro giusto" develops into one of Tschaikowsky's vividly colored climaxes. 



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Programme 

II. Louis Bourgault-Ducoudray. Abergavenny; "Suite de themes 

populaires Gallois'' — for String 

Quartet and Flute 
Moderato 

Andantino con moto 
Allegro moderato 
Lentissimo 

Allegro ma non troppo 
Moderato 
Modere 
The Casimir Quartet and Mr. Sharp 

Louis Albert Bourgault-Ducoudray (born Nantes 1840 — died Vernouillet 
1910) belonged to an old family of the Breton nobility. He was a nephew 
of Billault, the famous minister of the Second Empire and was himself a man 
of extraordinary gifts and scholarship. 

Although a lawyer by profession, he early gave serious attention to 
musical study and in 1862 carried off the first prize for composition at the 
Paris Conservatory with a cantata "Louise de Mezieres." He also wrote an 
opera "Thamar," produced in Paris, orchestral symphonies, a "Symphonic 
Rehgieuse" in five movements for mixed voices, a Stabat Mater in Gregorian 
style, et cetera. He was for many years lecturer at the Paris Conservatory 
on the History of Music, and so briUiant and erudite were his courses that 
crowds of auditors, students, musicians and the general pubHc attended. The 
French government, recognizing the unusual gifts of Bourgault'Ducoudray, 
sent him on special missions to Greece and to Cambodgia, from which coun- 
tries he returned with collections of melodies, folk'songs and notes on music 
which were most valuable and which were embodied in pamphlets and lee 
tures. In fact he was one of the first to recognize the importance of folk- 
song in the development of musical form. This natural interest in his native 
province, Brittany, resulted in the publication of "Thirty popular melodies 
of lower Brittany," collected and harmonized with French translation into 
verse by Francois Coppee. To his interest in and connection with the Gallic 
— still spoken in Brittany — may be referred the composition "Abergavenny" 
which is based upon GaUic airs and is named for the English market town 
Abergavenny on the river Usk near the town of Monmouth. 

The profound scholarship and brilliant and unique musical gifts of 
Bourgault-Ducoudray were combined with a nature singularly modest and 
averse to self-advertisement and publicity. For this reason, his work, original 
and charming as it is, is so little known outside of France. 

"Abergavenny" is a suite of seven short pieces simply transcribed and 
undeveloped thematically, although each in itself has a definite mood or char- 
acter. Their origin is Gallic and Welsh and one at least is famiHar to all the 
English speaking world. 

The first movement is martial in mood, in a very severe style approach- 
ing the Church Gregorian chant. The second, an Andantino, is a very 
beautiful melody given to the viola and flute. The tender character of the 
theme though very simple has a very pure and deep emotion recalHng the 
direct and pure style of some of Bizet's airs. Number three is a choric dance 
for male and female voices, doubtless used in some old festival. Number 
four is "Lento" of a most emotional and mysterious mood. Elegiac in char- 
acter, it evokes the exalted state of mind of one who feels himself in the 
sway of some mysterious external force, such as the early superstitious 
beliefs of the Irish, Celt and Gaul, or such as a poet may feel in inspirational 
rapture. Number five has a decided rhythm of Minuet form in tempo and 
may have been an old dance song. The sixth movement has a theme of 
eight bars for the male chorus with female voices replying and an ensemble 
of both. The air is familiar as the Welsh song "The Ash Grove" and sug- 
gests the "Star Spangled Banner." The last movement is very energetic and 
martial in character and may be a battle chant. 

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Programme 

III. RhEINHOLD MoRITZOVITCH GliERE ... Octet, Opus 5, for Four 

Violins, Two Violas, 
and Two Violoncelli 
Allegro moderato 
Allegro 
Andante 
Allegro assai 
The Casimir and Swastika Quartets 

Rheinhold Moritzovitch Gliere (1875'1926) composer and teacher at 
the Moscow Conservatory was of a Belgian family, but so thoroughly 
Russianized that he may be called the leader and final product of the Russian 
Classical school to which such men as Tschaikowsky, Glazounov, Scriabin, 
RimskyKorsakoff and Balakirev belong. He excels as a melodist and in his 
masterly understanding of the qualities and use of the various instruments. 
As gold medallist of the Moscow Conservatory, whose faculty has possibly 
never been equalled for brilliancy and sheer musicality, Gliere from the very 
beginning showed extraordinary gifts in writing for the larger forms of 
chamber music, seldom attempted by chamber music composers. Symphonies 
and symphonic poems, octets and septets and various other compositions 
testify to his prolific genius. 

The Octet, Opus 5, is evidence of Gliere's superb control of form and 
unique understanding of the tone color and effective use of the various 
instruments, individually and in combinations. It exhibits also the absolute 
sympathy and absorption of Gliere and the Russian barbaric and Asiatic 
melodic form as well as a certain tendency to absorb, or reflect style from 
other composers, instead of keeping exclusively to his own exceptionally 
fertile and unique gift for composition. The Octet is dedicated to J. W. 
Hfimaly. The first movement begins with a theme of four bars of a beau- 
tifuUy melodious Russian churchlike character, developed rhythmically until 
the 'cello introduces a new melody — a love song, so fluent, so suave, so rich 
that it seems as natural and warm as the sunshine in summer. It is carried 
along in a flood of melody, with eight voices joining together to reach a 
climax as powerful as those devised by Tschaikowsky. 

The second number is a beautiful and voluptuous dance motiv of 
oriental character, leading to the third movement which with extraordinary 
dramatic force and color paints for the imagination a scene from the Arabian 
nights — an amorous scene in an Arabian garden, the powerful Caliph, the 
fair slave and bands of dancers seem to pass before us in musical imagery. 
The last movement opens with a rude and barbaric theme developed side by 
side with one of pure Russian character of such wildness that the composer 
denotes it by the direction "feroce." 



The next concert will he given on April 13, J930 



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THE PENNSYLVANIA MUSEUM OF ART 

19294930 

Second Season of 
Chamber Music Concerts 

hy Artist-Students 

of 

The Curtis Institute of Music 



These Concerts Are Under the Direction of Mr. Louis Bailly 
Head of the Department of Chamber Music 



Fifth and Last Concert 



Sunday Evening, April 13, 1930 

at 8:15 o'doc\ 



The Piano is a Steinway 

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Programme 



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LuiGI BOCCHERINI Quintet in C major, for Two Violins, Viola and 

Two Violoncelli 

Andante con moto 

Menuctto 

Grave 

Rondo 

Gama Gilbert 1,,, ,. Orlando Cole 



yViolins wiM-fiiNL^u^ K^Kji^c (. yjg[Q^(.g[j^ 



Benjamin SharlipJ Frank Miller j 

Max Aronoff, Viola 

Luigi Boccherini (born Lucca, 1743 — died Madrid, 180?) received a 
part of his musical education in Rome where he rapidly became famous as a 
composer and player. He returned to Lucca where several original composi' 
tions of his were performed with success. The field there however was not 
promising enough for this brilliant young Italian and he made his way through 
the south of France to Paris where his gifts found a warm reception. He 
became the rage and many distinguished persons became his patrons; among 
them, the Spanish Ambassador, who urged him to visit; Madrid where he 
promised him a warm reception. Somewhere about 1769, Boccherini reached 
Madrid, only to find that he was not received by anyone of importance. At 
length, however, the brother of the King brought him into favor and he 
found himself again welcomed as an original and briUiant composer. He 
seems to have travelled in Germany and received from Frederich Wilhelm H, 
King of Prussia, the post of Chamber Composer to the King with an annual 
salary. He remained about ten years, when the King having died, he re- 
turned to Spain to end his days in direst want. 

Boccherini, Haydn, Mozart and Gluck may be classed together in a 
general way. Boccherini's facility was very great — the total number of his 
works amounts to four hundred and sixtyseven of which many are still un' 
published. His style, though far simpler than Mozart's, has many Mozartian 
characteristics of elegance while in depth of feehng and sincerity of emotion 
he comes nearer the classic severity of Gluck. The first movement of the 
String Quintet in C major is remarkable for its contrapuntal cleverness; the 
third, or slow movement for a gravity and profundity of feeling which is very 
rarely found among composers, especially Italians of Boccherini's date, while 
the Rondo has become equally famous with the Minuetto of Boccherini with 
which the whole world is familiar. 



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Programme 

JOHANN Sebastux Bach SLxth French Suite, for Eight Harps 

in Polyphonic Formation 

Allemande 
Courante 
Sarabande 
Polonaise 
Gavotte 
Menuet 
Bourree 

W'lLLUM Cameron Victoru Murdock 

Alice Chalifoux Edna Phillips 

Flora Greenwood Reva Reatha 

Mary Griffith Flor^mne Stetler 

Conducted by Mr. Carlos Salzedo 

(Head 0/ the Htpiinmint of Harp, The Curtis Institute 0/ Music) 

Johann Sebastian Bach (bom Eisenach, March, 1685 — died Leipzig, July, 1750) was the 
culminating flower of a long series of Bachs, a family which was originally of peasant class 
and may be traced back to the sixteenth century. A family, which for extraordinary and 
consistent musical gifts, presents an example of musical heredity uruque in history. Details 
concerning the personal life of Johann Sebastian Bach, the greatest of all the family and one 
of the outstanding musical geniuses of the world, are unfortunately very meager from the 
beginning to the end of his extraordinarily busy life, whose duration coincided with a period of 
deep and profound religious feeling among the German people following Luther and the 
religious revolution. Practically the only openings for a professional musidan of that time 
were to become a cantor or organist of some church or of some chapel connected with one of 
the many princely courts or to become a member of the town band whose duties were con- 
nected with municipal and religious affairs. 

Johann Sebastian Bach, after studying the violin and the organ, made his professional 
career and his tremendous reputation as a composer and reformer, first an organist in email 
local churches in the vicinity of Hamburg and later in more important ones in U'eimar and in 
Coethen. The church services, having been shorn of many elaborations introduced through the 
Roman Catholic service, were developing the chorale or hymn sung by the congregation and 
choir. There were also employed in the church services, types of masses and motets as well 
as cantatas, so called, which were primarily simple musical settings for Scriptural verses or 
dramatic Biblical scenes. In all of these different fields Bach produced almost countless original 
compositions — in fact his duties compelled him to compose original material for every Sunday 
service, every municipal festival or affair of importance and he met all of these demands with 
increasing technical ability, facility of thought and enormous originality of invention. Besides 
his duties in the church proper he became extremely interested in development of the technique 
and literature for the piano of his time. The importance of his work in this respect may be 
realized when we recall that before the day of Bach the use of the thumb in playing the 
clavecin or pia.no was praaically unknown and that Bach instituted an entirely new technique 
of playing which gave the performer practically two extra fingers through his use of the thumbs. 

In the year 1723, having already achieved a national reputation as organist and composer. 
Bach received a very important appointment to St. Thomas's Church in Leipzig. He had 
already made some attempt in the way of composing music for the Passion services of the 
church but it was during the last twenty-five years of his life which were spent in the service 
of St. Thomas's Church and choir that he completed his marvellous "Passions" of St. Matthew 
and St. John, works which have never been equalled in majestic power. Although Bach pro- 
duced an immense number of works, in none of them can be found a passage which is not 
sincere and genuine and which does not speak of the tender feeling and extreme susceptibility 
of the composer to the power of the words from the Scriptures to which he was composing 
music. It is said "he produced the finest suites, the finest organ music, the finest church 
cantatas, the finest solo violin music, the finest chorale motets, the finest chorale preludes and 
the finest passions." 

Lyon- SP He.ilt Harps 
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Programme 



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Henry PuRCELL Chacony in G minor for Strings 



Carmela Ippolito 
Lily Matison 
Frances Wiener 
Marian Head 
Gama Gilbert 
Benjamin Sharlip 
James Bloom 
George Pepper 



*V\o\\ni 



Esther Hare 
Margaret Hayes I 
Leon Frengut | 
Paull Ferguson 



Violas 



Katherine Conant 
Florence Williams 
Frank Miller 
Samuel Geschichter 



Violoncelli 



Conducted by Louis Wyner 

(Student in Conducting of Mr. £mil Mlynarski, Htai oj the Departments of 
Opera and Orchestra, The Curtis Institute of Music) 



Henry Purcell (born in London, 1659 — died 1685) was buried in 
Westminster Abbey "in a magnificent manner." The span of his life fell 
during the reigns of King Charles the Second, called the Merry Monarch, 
and King James the Second. He thus appears as a prominent figure in Eng' 
lish musical Hfe at the time when music, both for Church and pubUc, was 
at its lowest ebb following the destruction brought by the Enghsh revolution. 
In fact, even at the time Purcell had worked his way up to positions of im' 
portance as organist at Westminster and the Chappel Royal, there were 
practically no organs, very few musical scores, and no trained singers, either 
boys or men, to supply the necessary materials for the services of which 
Henry Purcell had charge. He set to work with inexhaustible courage to try 
to supply some of the deficiencies by copying with his own hand many of the 
scattered half ruined manuscripts of Church music and what was more, to 
compose himself a fine series of choral and instrumental works which may be 
classed with Handel or even Bach. 



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Programme 



Kl^URiCE Ravel . . Sheherazade — Three Poems for \'oice and Orchestra 

I. Asie 

II. La Flute enchantee 
III. Llndifferent 

Selma Amansky, Soprano 

(Student of Miss Hauliet van Emoen) 

Conducted by Sylvan LE\aN 

(Student in Conduaing of Ms.. £mil Mltn-.\rski) 

Maurice Ravel (born Ciboure, near St. Jean de Luz, Basses-Pyrenees, 
France, March, 187?) was, through his mother, of Basque lineage; in itself 
an indication of a temperament and character ardent and at the same time 
restrained. He received his musical education at the Paris Conservatory 
where from his first attempt at composition it appeared that his conception of 
music was well outlined, since his earliest compositions show his indi\'iduality 
unmistakably matured. This, however, did not create any favorable impres- 
sion for the young composer among the critics who regarded the young Ravel 
as a dangerous revolutionist musically, a legend which proved very detri- 
mental to his aspirations. He was refused the Grand Prix de Rome for 
several years from a mere prejudice against his musical innovations. His 
"Jeux d'eau" and "Pavane" for piano as well as his String Quartet had 
already been performed and published so that there was no doubt as to his 
abihty and the prejudices of the juries and critics. He continued to write 
many beautiful songs, especially during the years 1903-1906, among others 
the set Sheherazade, first published with piano accompaniment and after- 
wards orchestrated. 

In all of his works Ravel is revealed as a typical product of ?rench 
thought. Always self-restrained with an instinctive sense of form, his style 
is characterized by finish, point and piquancy to the last detail. Strangely 
enough, although one of the most expert and original of orchestrators, a large 
proportion of his orchestral works consists of rearrangements of piano works. 
He is recognized today as one of the most expert manipulators in orchestral 
color. While often being classed with and compared to Debussy one may 
say that where Debussy is a dreamer whose music is often an expression of 
fleeting mood, Ravel on the contrary* is direct, picturesque and poetic, making 
straight for clear cut character and effects where Debussy would prefer to 
have blurred the outline or merely suggested an atmosphere. 



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Trois Poemes sur des vers de 
Tristan Klingsor 

I. Asie 

Asie, Asie, Asie, 

Vieux pays mervcilleux des contes de nourrice, 
Oil dort la fantaisie comme une imperatrice 
En sa forf't tout emplie de mystere. 

Je voudrais m'en aller avec la goelette 
Qui se berce ce soir dans le port 
Mystf'rieuse et solitaire, 
Et qui di'ploie enfin ses voiles violettes 
Comme un immense oiseau de nuit dans le ciel 
d'or. 

Je voudrais m'en aller vers des ties de fleurs 

En t'coutant chanter la mer perverse 

Sur un vieux rythme ensorceleur. 

Je voudrais voir Damas et les villes de Perse 

Avec les minarets li'gers dans I'air. 

Je voudrais voir de beaux turbans de soie 

Sur des visages noirs aux dents claires. 

Je voudrais voir des yeux sotnbres d'amour 
Et des prunelles brillantes de joie, 
En des peaux jaunes comme des oranges; 
Je voudrais voir des vetements de velours 
Et des habits a longues franges. 

Je voudrais voir des calumets entre des bouches 

Tout entourc'es de barbe blanche; 

Je voudrais voir d'apres marchands aux regards 

louches, 
Et des cadis, et des vizirs 
Qui du seul mouvement de leur doigt qui se 

penche 
Accordent vie ou mort au grC de leur desir. 

Je voudrais voir la Perse, et I'lnde, et puis la 

Chine, 
Les mandarins ventrus sous les ombrelles, 
Et les princesses aux mains fines, 
Et les lettres qui se querellent 
Sur la poesie et sur la beautfi; 

Je voudrais m'attarder au palais enchante 
Et comme un voyageur etranger 
Contemplcr li loisir des paysages peints 
Sur des t'toffes en des cadres de sapin 
Avec un personnage au milieu d'un verger. 

Je voudrais voir des assassins souriant 
Du bourreau qui coupe un cou d'innocent 
Avec son grand sabre courbe d'Orient. 
Je voudrais voir des pauvres et des reines; 
Je voudrais voir des roses et du sang; _ 
Je voudrais voir mourir d'amour ou bien de 
haine. 

Et puis m'en revenir plus tard 

Narrer mon aventure aux curieux de roves 

En elevant comme Sindbad ma vieille tasse 

arabe 
De temps en temps jusqu'a mes l&vres 
Pour interrompre le conte avec art. 



(Translation) 

I. Asia 

Asia, O Asia! 

Land of wonderful tales renowned in ancient 

lore. 
Where fancy's spirit dwells like some fair 

sleeping empress 
'Mid her forest in mystery clad. 

Fain would I now set forth in yon swift little 

schooner 
Gently rocking in her harbour this eve 
With aspect strange and very lonely, — 
Which at tomorrow's dawn her red sails will 

i:nfurl 
Like a gigantic bird of night in a golden sky. 

Fain would I now set forth tow'rds the islands 

of flow'rs 
List'ning the while as chants the wilful sea 
The theme of some old magic spell. 
Fain would I see Damascus and the cities of 

Persia 
With minarets so light high in the air. 
Fain would I see soft silken turbans twined 
O'er dusky faces with glist'ning teeth. 

Fain would I see dark eyes burning with love. 
Their pupils shining and sparkling with joy, 
Tlieir skins a yellow of the ripest orange; 
Fain would I see the dress with rich velvet 

folds. 
The garment with long fringes bordered. 

Fain would I see the calumets tight held in 

mouths 
Hidden by beards grown long and snowy; 
Fain would I see sour-looking merchants with 

eyes askew; 
The cadis, too, and the great viziers 
Who have but to raise up their finger an inch 
To grant either life or death perchance, just 

as they will. 

Fain would I see Persia, India, ay even China, 
Stout mandarins who loll under umbrellas, 
Princesses sweet with tiny hands, 
And learned men loudly debating 
Over poetry and the chorus of beauty; 

1 would linger awhile at a palace enchanted 
And, like some foreign travelling sage. 
Contemplate at my ease old landscapes 

Done in colours rare on lovely textures framed 

with pine. 
With someone in the midst of an orchard, alone. 

Fain would I see murderous wretches who smile 
Whilst the headsman chops off innocent heads 
With scimitar deadly of true Eastern shape. 
Fain would I see poor beggars and rich queens; 
Fain would I see the rose and trace of blood; 
Fain would I see men die of love or else of 
hate. 

And then later, returning home. 

My story strange relate to those who believe 

in dreams, 
From time to time raising up my old Arabian 

cup 
Like Sindbad of yore, just to my lips. 
Only to break off the tale with art. 



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II. La Flute enchantee 

L'ombre est douce et ruon maitre dort, 

CoifiFe d'un bonnet conique de soie, 

Et son long nez jaune en sa barbe blanche. 

Mais moi, je suis eveillee encor, 

Et j'^coute au dehors 

Une chanson de flOte oil s'fpanche 

Tour k tour la tristesse ou la joie. 

Un air tour a tour langoureux ou frivole 

Que men amoureux cheri joue, 

Et quand je m'approche de la croisfe 

II me semble que chaque note s'envole 

De la flflte vers ma joue 

Comme un mvstOrieux baiser. 



II. 



(Translation) 

The Enchanted Flute 



Cool the shade and deep my master's sleep, 

Wearing his soft silken conical cap. 

His long yellow nose in bis snow-white beard. 

But I, who patiently vigil keep, 

I can hear far away 

Sweet music of a flute which creates in turn 

The yearning to laugh and to weep, 

A tune now of languorous charm, now quite 

gay. 
Which my own belovM doth play, 
And when I draw near to the casement high 
Then each note, as 'twould seem, doth hither fly 
From the flute to touch my face 
In mysterious sweet embrace. 



III. Llndifferent 

Tes yeux sont doux comme ceux d'une fille, 

Jeune etranger, 

Et la courbe fine 

De ton beau visage de duvet ombragS 

Est plus si'duisante encor de ligne. 

Ta l&vre chante sur le pas de ma porta 

Une langue inconnue et charmante 

Comme une musique fausse. 

Entre! Et que men vin te rOconforte 

Mais non, tu passes 

Et de mon seuil je te vois t'eloigner 

Me faisant un dernier geste avec grace 

Et la hanche Ifgfrement ployee 

Par ta demarche feminine et lasse. 



III. 



(Translation) 

The Heedless One 



Soft as a maid's those sad eyes of thine, 

O youth unknown. 

And the noble curve 

Of thy classic features newly shaded with down 

Looks far more seductive still in line. 

And in the song which at my door thou dost 

sing 
Speaks a tongue unfamiliar yet dulcet. 
Like music false in ring. 

Enter! Perchance a cup will lend thee spirit. 
But no, thou goest ; 

So from my threshold I see thee depart 
With a graceful sign to shew thou'lt not tarry. 
And with hip ever so lightly bent 
By a step as of a girl who's weary. 



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Orchestra PersonneJ 



cVPl 



First Violins 

Paul Gershman 
Philip Frank 
Ladislaus Steinhardt 
Lily Matison 
Robert Levine 
Marian Head 



Second Violins 

James Bloom 
George Pepper 
Henry Siegl 
Frances Wiener 
Jack Kash 
Charles Jaffe 



Violas 

Leon Frengut 
Sam Goldblum 
Leonard Mogill 
PauU Ferguson 



Violoncelli 

Frank Miller 
Katherine Conant 
Florence Williams 
Samuel Geschichter 



Basses 

Jack Posell 
Irven Whitenack 
Frank Eney 

Harps 

William Cameron 
Edna Phillips 

Flutes 
Maurice Sharp 
Ardelle Hookins 

Piccolo 
George Drexlcr 

Oboes 

Robert Bloom 
Sidney Divinsky 

English Horn 
Robert Hester 

Clarinets 
Robert McGinnis 
James CoUis 

Bassoons 

Frank Ruggieri 
Ervin Swenson 



Horns 

Theodore Seder 
Harry Berv 
Henry Whitehead 
Sune Johnson 

Trumpets 

John Harmaala 
Clement Schuler 

Trombones 

Guy Boswell 
John Coffey 
Gerald Wocrner 

Tuba 

Oscar Zimmerman 

Tympani 
Frank Schwartz 

Battery 

Samuel Krauss 
Salvatore Perrone 
Frank Sinatra 

Celesta 
Joseph Levine 



The above orchestral group has been chosen from the 
members of The Curtis Orchestra, which is com- 
posed of 110 players. 



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Columbia Borough School District 
High School Auditorium, Columbl\, Pennsylvania 

Monday Evening, T^ovemher 18, 1929, at 8. IS o'c]oc\ 



w 

The Curtis Institute of Music 

ARTIST-STUDENTS 

* Joseph Levine, Piano 
** Josephine Jirak, Contralto 
*** Iso Briselli, Violin 

t Theodore Saidekberg, Accompanist 

Programme 

I. Claude Debussy Claire de Lune 

NiCOL.JJ Medtner Fairy Tale in E minor 

M. DvoRSKY East and West 

Mr. Levixe 

II. LuDWiG VAN Beethoven In Questa Tomba Oscura 

Johannes Br.ahms Der Schmied 

Erich Wolff Faden 

fRuhe Meine Seele 
jueignung 
Miss Jirak 



Richard Strauss s _ 



III. Christlan Sinding Suite, Opus 10 

Tempo Giusto 

Adagio 

Presto 

Mr. Briselli 

IV. FiL\N2 Liszt Mephisto Valse 

Mr. Levine 

V. Richard Hageman Do Not Go, My Love 

Robert Clarke The Blind Ploughman 

Old Irish Air Danny Boy 

(Arranged by Weatherly) 

Pe.\rl Curr-an DauTi 

Miss Jirak 

VI. WaGNER-WiLHELM J . ..Walther's Preislied from "Die Meistersinger" 

PugnanI'Kreisler Praeludium e Allegro 

Mr. Briselli 

* Student of Mr. Josef Hofmann 
*• Student of Madame Marcella Sembrich 
••* Student of Mr. Efrem Zimbalist 

t Student of Mr. Harry Kaufman in Accompanying 

The Steinway is the official piano of The Cvrtis Institute of Music 



University of Delaware 
Wolf Hall, Newark, Delaware 

Thursday Evening, TS^ouember 21, 1929, at 8:00 o'cloc\ 



£S: 



The Curtis Institute of Music 

ARTIST-STUDENTS 

* Jeanne Behrend, Piano 
** Arthur Holmgren, Baritone 
*** Judith Poska, Violin 

t Theodore Saidenberg at the piano 

Programme 

I. George Frederick Handel Harmonious Blacksmith 

Claude Debussy Soiree en Grenade 

Miss Behrend 

II. George Frederick Handel . . . "Hear Me, Ye Winds and Waves" 
P ^ ( "O Mistress Mine" 

KOGER (^uilter I .gj^^^ gj^^^ r^^^^ Winter Wind" 

Mr. Holmgren 

III. Max Bruch Concerto in G minor, Opus 26 

Allegro moderato 
Adagio 

Allegro energico 
Miss Poska 

TV FRFDFRTr Chopin I ^^^^"^^^ ^^ ^ sharp minor, Opus 28, No. 8 

IV. i-REDERlC CHOPIN -j ^^Y^etzo in B flat minor, Opus 31 

Miss Behrend 

V. Thomas Koeneman "When the King Went Forth to War" 

Old English "Drink to Me Only With Thine Eyes" 

Negro Spiritual "Git on Board, Little Chillen" 

(Arranged by James Johnson) 

Mr. Holmgren 

VI. Alexandre Glazounow From the Ballet "Raymonda" 

Grand Adagio 
Valse 

Franz Ries La Capricciosa 

Franz Ernst Hungarian Airs 

Miss Poska 

• Student of Mr. Josef Hofmann 

** Student of Mr. Horatio Connell 

*** Student of Mme. Lea Luboshutz 

t Student of Mr. Harry Kaufman in Accompanying 

The Steinway is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 

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George School 

George School, Pennsylvania 
Saturday Evening, T^ovemher 23, 1929, at 8.00 o'cloc\ 



The Curtis Institute of Music 

ARTIST' STUDENTS 

* M.\x Aronoff, Viola 
** W'lLLL^M Harms, Piano 
*** Lois Putlitz, Violin 

t Florence Frantz, Accompanist 

I. Jeno Hubay Morceau de Concert, Opus 20 

Mr. Aronoff 

II. Felix Mendelssohn Variations Serieuses 

Mr. Harms 

III. Camille S.\inT'S.\ens Havanaise 

Miss Putlitz 

IV. Sergei Rachmaninoff Prelude in G sharp minor 

Abil\m Chasins Three Chinese Pieces 

Shanghai Tragedy 
Flirtation in a Chinese Garden 
Rush Hour in Hong Kong 
Mr. H.\rms 

V. AlEX.-\NDRE GlaZOUNOV. Grand Adagio from the Ballet "Raymonda" 

ChopiN'Spalding Valse in G flat, Opus 70, No. l 

Pablo de Sarasate Introduction and Tarantella 

Miss Putlitz 



* Student of Mr. Louis Bailly 
•* Student of Mr. Abram Chasins 
••* Student of Mr. Efrem Zimbalist 

t Student of Mr. Harry Kaufman in Accompanying 



The Steinwat is the official piano of The Curtis Institute oj Music 



s^ 



Western Maryland College 

Westminster, Maryland 
Monday Evening, T^ovemher 25, J 929^ at 8 o'c\oc\ 



The Curtis Institute of Music 
artist-students 

* Clarence Reinert, Bass-Baritone 
** Paul Gershman, Violin 
*** Helen Jepson, Soprano 

t Theodore Saidenberg, Accompanist 

PROGRAMME 

I. Secchi "Lungi Dal Caro Bene" 

Gl\como Carissimi "Vittoria mio core" 

George Frederick Handel "Hear Me, Ye Winds and Waves" 

Mr. Reinert 

II. Henri Wieniawski Souvenir de Moscow 

Mr. Gershman 

III. Giacomo Puccini "In Quelle Trine Morbide" 

Fr.'lNCEsco Cavalli "Donzelle Fuggite" 

Pietro a. Tirindelli "Portami Via" 

Miss Jepson 

rv. Wolfgang Am.\deus Mozart "Within This Sacred Dwelling" 

Felix Mendelssohn "I am a Roamer Bold" 

Richard Wagner "Die Frist ist um" 

Mr. Reinert 

V. Felix Mendelssohn From Concerto in E minor. Opus 64 

Andante 

Allegretto non troppo 
Allegro molto vivace 
Mr. Gershman 

VI. Henry Hadley "My True Love Hath My Heart" 

Franco Leoni "Tally Ho!" 

Old Irish Air "Would God Were I a Tender Apple Blossom" 

(Arranged by Percy Grainger) 

Richard Hageman "At the Well" 

Miss Jepson 

* Student in Operatic Acting 
*• Student of Mr. Eprem Zimbalist 
•** Student of Mr. Horatio Connell 

t Student of Mr. Harrt Kaufman in Accompanying 

The Steinw.\y is the official piano of The Curtis Institute oj Music 

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Westtown School 

Westtown, Pennsylvania 
Friday Evening, December 6, 1929, at 7. IS o'clock 



The Curtis Institute of Music 

ARTIST-STUDENTS 

* Paul Gershman, Violin 
** Daniel Healy, Tenor 
*** Joseph Levine, Piano 

t Theodore Saidenberg, Accompanist 

«^» 

PROGRAMME 

I. Henri Wieniawski Souvenir de Moscow 

Mr. Gershman 

II. Stefano Donaudy Spirate, pur Spirate 

Carl Bohm Calm as the Night 

Mr. Healy 

III. Claude Debussy Claire de Lune 

NicOLAi Medtner Fairy Tale, in E minor 

M. Dvorsky East and West 

Mr. Levine 

IV. Felix Mendelssohn From Concerto in E minor, Opus 64 

Andante 

Allegretto non troppo 
Allegro molto vivace 
Mr. Gershman 

V. Gaetano Donizetti "Una furtiva Lagrima" from "L'Elisir d'Amore" 

Arthur Penn Sunrise and You 

Mr. Healy 

VI. Franz Liszt Mephisto Valse 

Mr. Levine 



• Student of Mr. Efrem Zimbalist 
** Student of Mr. Horatio Connell 
*** Student of Mr. Josep Hofmann 

t Student of Mr. H.\rry Kalpman in Accompanying 

The Steinwat is the official piano of The Clrtis Institute oj Mlsic 



State Teachers' College 

auditorium 

East Stroudsburg, Pennsylvania 

Friday Evening, December 13, 1929, at 8 o'doc\ 



The Curtis Institute of Music 

ARTIST-STUDENTS 

* Martha Halbwachs, Piano 
** Edna Hochstetter, Soprano 
*** C.\RMELA Ippolito, VioUn 
t Soma Hodge, Piano 
j Earl Fox, Accompanist 

PROGRAMME 

I. Johannes Brahms Capriccio in F sharp minor 

i:„ '^-„,„ r>„„„,^, i Etude in C minor, Opus 10, No. 12 

Frederic Chopin "^p^j-nu • r\ tcxt x 

1, Etude in \j sharp minor, Upus 25, No. 6 

Franz Liszt Gnomenreigen 

Miss Halbwachs 

II. Leo Delibes Regrets 

Paul Vidal Ariette 

Benjamin Godard < /. ?^*f 

I Air de Leonora 

Peter Iljitch Tschaikowsky Toujours a Toi 

Miss Hochstetter 

III. JoHANN Sebastian Bach Adagio 

Jean Senaille Allegro 

Christoph Willibald Gluck Melodie 

Wolfgang Amadeus Moz.\rt Rondo 

Miss Ippolito 

IV. Johannes Brahms First Movement \rom Concerto in B flat major 

Miss Halbwachs 
(Orchestral part played on a second piano by Miss Hodge) 

V. Frederic Chopin Lithuanian Song 

Sergei R.\chmaninoff Deep in Love Was I 

L.^NDON Ron.\ld Life 

Liza Lehmann The Cuckoo 

Miss Hochstetter 

VI. Felix Mendelssohn from. Violin Concerto in E minor 

Andante 

Allegro molto vivace 
Miss Ippolito 

* Student of Mr. Josep Hofmann 
** Student of M.\dame Marcella Sembrich 
*** Student of Mr. Efrem Zimbalist 

t Student of MAD.^ME Is.\belle Vengerova 

% Student of Mr. H-arry K.\ufman in Accompanying 

The Steinwat is the official piano of The Curtis Institlte of Misic 



i||ll!M!.Hi -i M'. .H'i" l.liH 



Cedar Crest College for Women 

Allentown, Pennsylvania 
Saturday Evening, December 14, 1929, at 8 o'cloc\ 



The Curtis Institute of Music 

ARTIST-STUDENTS 

* Martha Halbwachs, Piano 
** Edna Hochstetter, Soprano 
*** Carmela Ippolito, Violin 
t SoNiA Hodge, Piano 
j Earl Fox, Accompanist 

<^^ 

PROGRAMME 

I. Johannes Brahms Capriccio in F sharp minor 

„ . , ^ i Etude in C minor, Opus 10, No. 12 

Frederic Chopin | ^^^^^ ^^ ^ ^^^^p ^^^^^^ Qp^^ 25, No. 6 

Franz Liszt Gnomenreigen 

Miss Halbwachs 

II. Leo Delibes Regrets 

Paul Vidal Ariette 

Benjamin Godard [ ^^^ de Yeonora 

Peter Iljitch Tschaikowsky Toujours a Toi 

Mss Hochstetter 

III. JoHANN Sebastian Bach Adagio 

Jean Senaille Allegro 

Christoph Willibald Cluck Melodic 

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart Rondo 

Mss Ippolito 

IV. Johannes Brahms First Movement from Concerto in B flat major 

Miss Halbwachs 
(Orchestral part played on a second piano by Mss Hodge) 

V. Frederic Chopin Lithuanian Song 

Sergei Rachmaninoff Deep in Love Was I 

Landon Ronald Life 

Liza Lehmann The Cuckoo 

Mss Hochstetter 

VI. Felix Mendelssohn From Violin Concerto in E minor 

Andante 

Allegro molto vivace 
Miss Ippolito 

* Student of Mr. Josep Hofmann 
** Student of Madame MUrcella Sembrich 
*** Student of Mr. Efrem Zimbalist 

t Student of Madame Isabelle Vengerova 

J Student of Mr. H-^rrv Kaufman in Accompanying 

The Steinway is the official piano of The Cl-rtis Institlte oj Music 



j^ iimLjii.i- , i .i l l' ;, : , : i::'m : !:i]. : 



■i:.''i'iV:i' ■:'"i"iiiirr'-T-T- 



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The Contemporary Club 

Trenton, New Jersey 

Thursday Evening, January 9, 1930, at 8.30 o'cloc\ 



The Curtis Institute of Music 

ARTIST-STUDENTS 

*Tatiana Sanzewitch, Piano 
**Arthur Holmgren, Bass-baritone 
***Paul Gershman, Violin 

tJoSEPH Rubaxoff, Accompanist 

«^» 

PROGRAMME 

I. Johann Sebastian Bach Chromatic Phantasy and Fugue 

Frederic Chopin Etude in C minor, Opus 25, No. 12 

Miss Sanzewitch 

II. Secchi Lungi Dal Caro Bene 

Johannes Brahms Auf Dem Schiffe 

Franz Schubert Der Wanderer 

Roger Quilter Blow, Blow, Thou Winter Wind 

Mr. Holmgren 

III. Camille Saint-Saens Havanaise 

Henri Wieniawski Souvenir de Moscow 

Mr. Gershman 

IV. Frederic Chopin Nocturne in F sharp major, Opus 15, No. 2 

Franz Liszt Mephisto Valse 

Miss Sanzewitch 

V. Thomas Koeneman When the King Went Forth to War 

Negro Spirituals J De Gospel Train 

(Arranged by Henry Burleigh) I Deep River 

Modeste Moussorgsky The Siege of Kazan 

Mr. Holmgren 

•Student of Mr. Josep Hofmavn 

**Student of Mr. Hor.'\tio Conn ell 

•**Student of Mr. Efrem Zimbalist 

tStudent of Mr. Harry K.m;pman in Accompanying 

The Steinway is the official piano of The Curtis Institute oj Music 



^1 



The Hill School 
memorl\l auditorium 

PoTTSTOWN, Pennsylvania 
Sunday Evening, January 12, 1930, at 7:30 o'doc\ 



The Curtis Institute of Music 
artist-students 

* Florenxe Fraktz, Piano 
** George Pepper, Violin 
*** Max Aronoff, Viola 

t Theodore S.\idenberg, Accompanist 

«^» 

PROGRAlvlME 

I. Frederic Chopin Ballade in F minor, Opus 52 

Miss Frantz 

II. Ernest Bloch "Nigun" from Suite — "Baal Shem" 

Mr. Pepper 

III. Jeno Hubay Morceau de Concert, Opus 20 

Mr. Aronoff 

IV. Strauss — Schulz-Evler. . .Concert Arabesques on the Blue Danube Waltz 

Miss Frantz 

V. Peter I. Tschaikowsky Danse Arabe 

Johannes Brahms Hungarian Dance 

Mr. Pepper 

* Student of Mad.ame Isabelle Vexgerova 
•* Student of Professor Leopold Aler 
•** Student of Mr. Louis Baillt 

t Student of Mr. Harry Kaufman in Accompanying 

The Steinumt is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 



Auspices of Crescendo Club 

Vernon Room— K^ddon Hall 
Atlantic City, New Jersey 

'Wednesday Evening, ]amia/ry 22, 1930, at 8.30 o'cloc\ 



The Curtis Institute of Music 

ARTIST-STUDENTS 

f The Swasti\a Quartet 
Gama Gilbert 1... ,. Max Aronoff, Viola 

Benjamin Sharlip j Orlando Cole, Violoncello 

Assisted by 

* Leon Frengut, Viola ** Joseph Levine, Piano 

*** Edna Phillips, Harp 

PROGRAMME 

I. Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart String Quintet in C minor, Kochel 

No. 406 
Allegro 
Andante 

Menuetto in canone 
Allegro 
Swastika Quartet and Mr. Frengut 

n. Jean-Philippe Rameau Gavotte from "The Temple of Glory" 

(1683-1764) 

Karl Philipp Emanuel Bach Solfeggietto 

(1714-1788) 

i Mirage 
Carlos Salzedo J Introspection 

Miss Phillips ^ Whirlwind 

III. Robert Schumann Piano Quintet in E flat major, Opus 44 

Allegro brillante 

In modo d'una marcia (Un poco largamente) 

Scherzo, molto vivace 

Allegro ma non troppo 

Swastika Quartet and Mr. Levine 

* Student of Mr. Louis Bailly 
** Student of Mr. Josef Hofmann 
•** Student of Mr. Carlos Salzedo 

t Students of Mr. Bailly in Chamber Music 

The Steinway is the official piano of The Curtis Institltf, of Music 

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Marywood College 

SciL'\NTON, Pennsylvania 
Thursday Evening, January ?>0, 1930, at 8.00 o'cloc\ 



The Curtis Institute of Music 

ARTIST-STUDENTS 

* William Harms, Pianist 
** Florence Irons, Soprano 
*** Ladislaus Steinhardt, Violinist 
t Earl Fox, Accompanist 

PROGRAMME 

I. Felix Mendelssohn Variations Serieuses 

Mr. Harms 

II. Frederic Chopin Lithuanian Song 

Alexander Gretchaninoff Over the Steppe 

Charles Gilbert Spross Will o' the Wisp 

Miss Irons 

III. CorellI'Kreisler La Folia 

Mr. Steinhardt 

IV. Frederic Chopin Nocturne in C sharp minor, Opus 

27, No. 1 

Strauss- — Schulz-Evler Concert Arabesques on the Blue 

Danube Waltz 
Mr. Harms 

V. Maurice Besly Three Little Fairy Songs 

Landon Ronald Away on the Hill 

Charles Willeby Coming Home 

Richard Kountz The Sleigh 

Miss Irons 

VI. Ponce-Heifetz Estrellita (Mexican Serenade) 

Henri Wieniawski Souvenir de Moscow 

Jeno Hubay Zephir 

Mr. Steinhardt 

* Student of Mr. Abram Chasins 

** Student of Mr. Horatio Connell 

*** Student of Mr. Edwin Bachmann 

t Student of Mr. Harry Kaufman in Accompanying 

The Steinway is the official piano of The Curtis Institute o/ Music 



State Teachers College 

the auditorium 
East Stroudsburg, Pennsylvania 

Friday Evening, January Zl, 1930, at 8:00 o'c\oc\ 



The Curtis Institute oj Music 

ARTIST-STUDENTS 

*WiLLiAM Harms, Fianist 
**Florence Irons, Soprano 
***Ladislaus Steinhardt, Violinist 
fEARL Fox, Accompanist 

PROGRAMME 

I. JoHANN Sebastian Bach Chaconne 

Mr. Harms 

II. Frederic Chopin Lithuanian Song 

Alexander Gretchaninoff Over the Steppe 

Charles Gilbert Spross Will o' the Wisp 

Miss Irons 

III. CorellI'Kreisler La Folia 

Mr. Steinhardt 

IV. Abram Chasins / Fhrtation in a Chinese Garden 

\ Rush Hour in Hong Kong 

Strauss — Schulz-Evler Concert Arabesques on the Blue 

Danube Waltz 
Mr, Harms 

V. Maurice Besly Three Little Fairy Songs 

Landon Ronald Away on the Hill 

Charles Willeby Coming Home 

Richard Kountz The Sleigh 

Miss Irons 

VI. Ponce-Heifetz Estrellita (Mexican Serenade) 

Henri Wieniawski Souvenir de Moscow 

Jeno Hubay Zephir 

Mr. Steinhardt 

*Student of Mr. Abram Chasins 

**Student of Mr. Horatio Connell 

***Student of Mr. Edwin Bachmann 

tStudent of Mr. Harry Kaufman in Accompanying 

The Steinwat is the official piano of The Curtis Institute o/ Music 

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The Hill School 

memorial auditorium 
PoTTSTOWN, Pennsylvania 

Sunday Evening, February 2, 1930, at 7.30 o'cloc\ 



The Curtis Institute of Music 

ARTIST-STUDENTS 

* Edna Phillips, Harpist 
** Conrad Thibault, Baritone 
*** Philip Frank, Violinist 

t Yvonne Krinsky, Accompanist 

PROGRAMME 

I. JOHANN Sebastian Bach Bourree 

Karl Philipp Emanuel Bach . . Solfeggietto 

Josef Haydn Theme and Variations 

JeaN'Philippe Rameau Gavotte from "Le Temple de la 

Gloire" 
Miss Phillips 



-,•, ^ ^ ^ r. f The Happy Love 

II. Three Old English Songs J y^^ Lovely Celia 

(Arranged by Lane Wilson) ( The Pretty Great 



Mr. Thibault 



III. Fritz Kreisler La Gitana 

Henri Wieniawski Scherzo-Tarantelle 

Mr. Frank 

IV. Carlos Salzedo J intrSpection 

Miss Phillips ( Whirlwind 

V. Josephine McGill Duna 

Edward German Charming Chloe 

Deems Taylor Captain Stratton's Fancy 

Mr. Thibault 

VI. Pablo de Sarasate Gypsy Airs 

Mr. Frank 



• Student of Mr. Carlos Salzedo 
** Student of Mr. Emilio de Gogorza 
*** Student of Mr. Efrem Zimbalist 

t Student of Mr. Harry Kaufman in Accompanying 

The Steinway is the official piano of The Curtis Institute o/ Music 



sSj ^^^ll l l l iii i i l lii n iiiiiii iiini i n iii in ii n i i i llliiiiiiinniliniinillllllllllllliniMl l lll ll ill lll l ll l l llil i n i l l ll l llll ll lll l ll i l l ll lHl l h l l ll Ml lli nilll l lll l lll lllll l Il ll ll ll j 

Haddon Fortnightly Club 

Artisans' K\ll 

Haddonfield, New Jersey 

Wednesday Evening, February S, 1930, at 8.30 o'cloc\ 



The Curtis Institute of Music 

ARTIST-STUDENTS 

* Selma Amansky, Soprano 
**■ Beniamino Grobani, Baritone 
*** Martha Halbwachs, Pianist 
t Sonia Hodge, Pianist 
ft Earl Fox, Accompanist 

PROGRAMME 

I. Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart "La ci darem la Mano" 

from "Don Giovanni" 
Miss Amansky and Mr. Grobani 

II. Pietro Cimara Non Piu 

_ , , f Neue Liebe 

Felix Mendelssohn \ Hexenlied 

Peter Iljitcsh Tschaikowsky Deception 

Frank La Forge To a Messenger 

Charles Gounod "Jewel Song" from "Faust" 

Miss Amansky 

III. Johannes Brahms O, wusst' ich doch den Weg zuriick 

Robert Schumann Wanderlied 

Edward Horsman The Shepherdess 

! Death and the Peasant (Sung 
in Russian) 
"Varlaam's Air" from "Boris 
Godounoff" 
Mr. Grobani 

IV. Johannes Brahms Piano Concerto, No. 2, in B flat 

Major, Opus 83 
Allegro non troppo 
Allegro appassionato 
Andante 

Allegretto grazioso 
Miss Halbwachs 
(Orchestral part played on a second piano by Miss Hodge) 

* Student of Miss Harriet van Emden 
** Student of Mr. Emilio de Gogorza 
*** Student of Mr. Josef Hofmann 

t Student of Madaxie Isabelle Vengerova 
tt Student of Mr. Harry Kaufman in Accompanying 

The Steinwat is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 



State Teachers' College 

West Chester, Pennsylvania 

Thursday Evening, February 6, 1930, at 8 o'clock^ 



The Curtis Institute of Music 

ARTIST-STUDENTS 

* Florence Frantz, Pianist 
** Henriette Horle, Soprano 
*** Judith Poska, Violinist 
t Earl Fox, Accompanist 

Theodore Si:-idenberg, Accompanist 

PROGRAMME 

I. Frederic Chopin / Prelude in B flat, Opus 28, No. 21 

\ Ballade in F minor. Opus 52 
Miss Frantz 

II. Stefano Donaudy Spirate, pur Spirate 

Fritz Kreisler The Old Refrain 

Francesco Verdi "Ah, fors' e lui" from "La 

Traviata" 
Miss Horle 

III. Bach-Kreisler Preludium in E major 

WagneR'Wilhelmj "Preislied" from "Die Meistersinger" 

Saint- Saens — Ysaye Valse- Caprice 

Miss Poska 

IV. Glinka-Balakirew The Lark 

Strauss — Schulz-Evler Concert Arabesques on the Blue Danube 

Waltz 
Miss Frantz 

V. Thomas Brown Shepherd, Thy Demeanor Vary 

Werner Josten The Wind Flowers 

Anton Dvorak Songs My Mother Taught Me 

Richard Strauss Voci di Primavera 

Miss Horle 

VI. Fritz Kreisler Caprice Viennoise 

Henri Wieniawski Scherzo-Tarantelle 

Miss Poska 



* Student of Madaxie Isabelle Vengerova 
** Student of Madame Marcella Sembrich 
*** Student of Madame Lea Luboshutz 

t Student of Mr. Harry Kaufman in Accompanying 

The Steinw.w is the oflScial piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 

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Dorset Players — incorporated 

Dorset, Vermont 

Saturday Evening, February 15, J 930, at 8.00 o'doc\ 



The Curtis Institute of Music 

ARTIST-STUDENTS 

♦Florence Fraxtz, Pianist 
**LOIS PUTLITZ, \''ioIiTiist 



*^^ 



PROGRAMME 

I. Ces.«lR Franck Sonata in A major, for Violin and Piano 

Allegretto ben moderate 
Allegro 

Recitative — Fantasia 
Allegretto poco mosso 
Miss Putlitz and Miss Frantz 

INTERMISSION 

„ ^ , , ^ f Prelude in B flat, Opus 28, No. 21 

II. Frederic Chopin ^^ B^^d^ ^^ p ^„„,^ Qpus 52 

Miss Frantz 

III. Camille Saint-Saens Havanaise 

Miss Putlitz 

IV. Glixka-Balakirew The Lark 

Strauss — Schulz-Evler. .Concert Arabesques on the Blue Danube Waltz 

Miss Frantz 

V. WagneR'Wilhelm J "Preislied" from "Die Meistersinger" 

PoncE'Heifetz Estrellita (Mexican Serenade) 

Pablo de Sarasate Introduction et Tarantelle 

Miss Putlitz 



•Student of Mad.ime Isabelle Vekgerova in Piano and of Mr. H\rry Kaipman 
in Accompanying 

••Student of Mr.. Efrem Zimbalist 



^^ 



K llllllllllllllllinillllllllllllllllllllllllllliiiiiiiMiii iiiiiniiiniiiiiniiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiii I iiiiiiiiiininiiini iiiniiiiiiiiii riiiiniii in mi iiii[ ? 

NoRRisTOWN Octave Club 
Y. W. C. A. Hall 

NoRRiSTOWN, Pennsylvania 

"Wednesday Afternoon, February 19, 1930, at 2.30 o'cloc\ 



The Curtis Institute of Music 

ARTIST-STUDENTS 

*Agnes Davis, Soprano 
**Sara Newell, Accompanist 

***Casimir Quartet 
Leonid BoLOTiNELy^. ,. Leon Frengut, Viola 

Paul GershmanJ '° '"^ Tibor de Machula, Vioionceno 

PROGRAMME 

I. Claude Debussy "Beau Soir" 

Georges Hue "J'ai pleure en reve" 

Georges Bizet "Je dis que rien ne m'epouvante" 

from "Carmen" 
Miss Davis 

II. LuDWiG VAN Beethoven String Quartet in F major, Opus 18, No. 1 

Allegro con brio 

Adagio aiTettuoso ed appassionato 

Scherzo — Allegro molto 

Allegro 

Casimir Quartet 

III. Roger Quieter Go Lovely Rose 

Sergei Rachmaninoff The Soldier's Bride 

Edward Horsman The Bird of the Wilderness 

Miss Davis 

IV. Peter Iljitsch Tschaikowsky String Quartet in D major. Opus 11 

Moderato e semplice 

Andante cantabile 

Scherzo — Allegro non tanto e con fuoco 

Finale — Allegro giusto 

Casimir Quartet 



*Student of Mr. Emilio de Gogorza 
**Student of Mr. Harry Kaufman in Accompanying 
***Students of Mr. Louis Bailly in Chamber Music 

The Steinway is the official piano of The Ci^rtis Institute of Music 

Illllllllll'IIIIIIIIIIIUIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIinil I I lllllllllllll iTiliilililllllllllll iiiiiniiinilllllllllllllllllll lllllllllllllllllllllllll llllliilniiiij 



University of Delaware 

wolf hall 

Newark, Delaware 

Auspices: 7^ewar\ Music Society 
Thursday Evening, February 20, 1930 at 8:00 o'cloc\ 



The Curtis Institute of Music 

ARTIST-STUDENTS 

*Celia Gomberg, Violinist 
**Clarence Reinert, Baritone 
***Florence Frantz, Pianist 

tJoSEPH RuBANOFF, Accompanist 

PROGRAMME 

I. DvoraK'Kreisler Slavonic Dance in G minor 

Henri Wieniawski Romance from Concerto in D minor 

Christian Sinding Presto from Suite in A minor, Opus 10 

Miss Gomberg 

II. LuDwiG VAN Beethoven In Questa Tomba Oscura 

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart Within this Sacred Dwelling 

Charles Gounod The Smithy Song 

Mr. Reinert 

III. Frederic Chopin / Prelude in B flat. Opus 28, No. 21 

I Ballade in F minor. Opus 52 
Miss Frantz 

IV. Ponce-Heifetz Estrellita (Mexican Serenade) 

Fritz Kreisler La Gitana (Arabo-Spanish Gipsy Song) 

Godowsky-Press Waltz (Old Vienna) 

PugnanI'Kreisler Praeludium and Allegro 

Miss Gomberg 

V. Frances Allitsen The Lute Player 

Felix Mendelssohn I am a Roamer Bold 

Walter Damrosch Danny Deever 

Mr. Reinert 

VI. GlinkA'Balakirew The Lark 

Strauss — Schulz-Evler. .Concert Arabesques on the Blue Danube Walts 
Miss Frantz 

*Student of Madame Lea Luboshuti 
**Student in Operatic Acting 
***Student of Madame Isabelle Vengerova 

tStudent of Mr. Harry Kaufman in Accompanying 

The Steinway is the official piano of The Curtis Institute oj Music 

Jiiuiiin]iiMi | i ||||||| ||| | || |||||||| | ||||||||||||| | |||| | ||i||||i | || | ||||| [ | ||| | | ||| | | | |||| || | |iiiiiiMinniiiiiiiiMiHnniMniMiiiiiiiiiiiiii ii n i j iiiiiiii i iii n i ii i i iii i iiii ] i M i M mm iirii n ii 



University of Delaware 

wolf hall 
Newark, Delaware 

Auspices; 7^ewar\ Music Society 
Thursday Evening, March 20, 1930 at 8.00 o'doc\ 



The Curtis Institute of Music 

ARTIST-STUDENTS 

*Tatiana de Sanzewitch, Pianist 
**Daniel Healy, Tenor 
***George Pepper, Violinist 

fTHEODORE Saidenberg, Accompanist 

*^ 

PROGRAMME 

I. JoHANN Sebastian Bach Fantasy, Fugue and Toccata in D major 

Josef Hofmann Berceuse 

Isaac Albeniz Seguidilla 

Miss Sanzewitch 

II. Stefano Donaudy O Del Mio Amato Ben 

Old French Bergere Legere 

Franz Schubert Serenade 

Johannes Brahms Roslein Dreie 

Mr. Healy 

III. Ernest Bloch "Nigun" from Suite "Baal Shem" 

E. Gresser Chassidic Dance 

Mr. Pepper 

IV. Frederic Chopin Nocturne in F sharp major, Opus 15, No. 2 

Franz Liszt Mephisto Valse 

Miss San:;ewitch 

WiendelSSOhn /Recitative: "Ye People Rend "J ^ ..t^, 

V. Geu rub rKHUEKK rHATTOFi. \ Your Hearts" l^'"°V'- u- 

(.Aria: "If With All Your Hearts" j ^^'^^^ 
Arthur Sullivan O, Mistress Mine 

Roger Quilter Im° ^'kT tk w ^ w ^ 

(blow, Blow, Ihou Winter Wind 

Mr. Healy 

VI. Wagner- Auer Lohengrin's Farewell from "Lohengrin" 

Brahms-Kreisler Hungarian Dance, No. 17 

Mr. Pepper 

*Studcnt of Mr. Josef Hofm.'^nn 

**Student of Mr. Hor.atio Connell 

***Student of Professor Leopold Aier 

fStudent of Mr. Harry K.'vufm.-xn in Accompanying 

The Steinway is the official piano of The Curtis Institute oj Music 

«■ <i 

• I'liiiiiiii iiii»iiiin||i|ii|||ii,j|illlinil]u;lll[llllllllllllllli;lllllilllll'lllllllllli:illlliHllililllliiiinniiiiijiniiiiiiiiiiiiniiiini in i ii i ii iiiiiiimiiiii j 



State Teachers' College 

West Chester, Pennsylvania 
Thursday Evening, March 27, 1930, at 8:00 o'c\oc\ 



The Curtis Institute of Music 

ARTIST-STUDENTS 

*RoBERT Cato, Organist 
**Florence Irons, Soprano 
***Philip Frank, Violinist 
fEARL Fox, Accompanist 



Assisted by Chamber Orchestra 

I 

f Oboes 



Philip Frank ) w. ,. Jack Posell, Double Bass 

James Bloom ( '" "" Ervin Swenson, Bassoon 

Leon Frengut, Viola Robert Bloom 

Frank Miller, Violoncello Robert Hester 

Conducted by Sylvan Levin 



PROGRAMME 

I. Charles-Marie Widor Allegro from Sixth Symphony 

Johannes Brahms Chorale Prelude: "A Rose 

breaks into Bloom" 

Paul de Maleingreau "The Tumult in the Praetorium" from 

"Symphonie de la Passion" 

JoHANN Sebastian Bach Fugue in D major 

Mr. Cato 

II. Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart "Deh Vieni, Non Tardar" from 

"Le Nozze di Figaro" 

Johannes Brahms J Botschaft 

Miss Irons (Von Ewiger Liebe 

III. Pablo de Sarasate j Romance Andalusia 

Mr. Frank 1 Introduction and Tarantelle 

IV. Alexandre Gretchaninoff Over the Steppe 

Sergei Rachmaninoff The Floods of Spring 

Frederic Chopin Lithuanian Song 

Charles Gilbert Spross Will o' the Wisp 

Miss Irons 

V. George Frederic Handel Concerto, No. 5, in F major, for 

Organ, with accompaniment 
played by Chamber Orchestra 
Larghetto — Allegro 
Alia Siciliana — Presto 
Mr. Cato 

*Student of Mr. Lynnwood Farnam 

**Student of Mr. Horatio Connell 

***Student of Mr. Eprem Zimbalist 

fStudent of Mr. Harry Kaufman in Accompanying 

The Steinwav is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 



¥B 



COATESVILLE CeNTURY ClUB 

HIGH SCHOOL AUDITORIUM 

COATESVILLE, PeNNSYLVANL^ 

Monday Evening, April 14, J 930 at 8:00 o'cloc\ 



The Curtis Institute of Music 

ARTIST-STUDENTS 

*Jeanne Behrend, Pianist 
**FlORENZO Tasso, Tenor 
***Iso Briselli, Violinist 

tJoSEPH RuBANOFF, Accompanist 

PROGRAMME 

I. George Frederick Handel Harmonious Blacksmith 

Maurice Ravel Jeux d'Eau (The Fountain) 

Miss Behrend 

II. Francesco Tosti Vorrei 

Ruggiero Leoncavallo "Vesti la Giubba" from "PagHacci" 

Tito Mattei Non e Ver 

Mr. Tasso 

III. TartinI'Kreisler Fugue in A major 

Christian Sinding Adagio and Presto from 

Suite in A minor 
Mr. Briselli 

IV. Frederic Chopin f Fantaisie-Impromptu, Opus 66 

j Scherzo in B flat minor. Opus 31 

Miss Behrend 

V. Ottorino Respighi Nebbie 

GiACOMO Puccini "E lucevan le stelle" from "Tosca" 

Pietro Cimara Stornello 

Mr. Tasso 

VI. Wagner- WiLHELM J "Wakher's PreisHed" from "Die 

Meistersinger" 

Tor Aulin Humoresque 

Cartier-Kreisler La Chasse 

Mr. Briselli 

•Student of Mr. Josep Hofmann 
**Student of Mr. Emilio de Gogorza 
•**Student of Mr. Eprem Zimbalist 

fStudent of Mr. Harry Kaufm.\n in Accompanying 

The Steinway is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 



The Salon Music Club 

strand theatre 

Lambertville, New Jersey 

Thursday Evening, May 1, 1930, at 8. J 5 o'cloc\ 



The Curtis Institute of Music 

ARTIST-STUDENTS 

*The Swasti\a Sluartet 

Gama Gilbert "I Max Aronoff, Viola 

Benjamin Sharlip ) '° '"* Orlando Cole, Violoncello 

**J0SEPHINE Jirak, Contralto 

***Leonard Cassini, Pianist 

fSARA Newell, Accompanist 

PROGRAMME 

I. Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart Quartet in D minor, Kochel No. 421 

Allegro moderato 

Andante 

Menuetto — Allegretto 

Allegretto ma non troppo 

The Swastika Quartet 

II. Richard Strauss Ruhe, Meine Seele! 

Robert Schumann Widmung 

Erich Wolff Faden 

Richard Wagner. . . "Erda's Warnung an Wotan" from "Das Rheingold " 

Franz Schubert Gruppe aus dem Tartarus 

Miss Jirak 

III. Frederic Chopin Scherzo in B minor. Opus 20 

Franz Liszt Tarantella — "Venezia e Napoli" 

Mr. Cassini 

IV. Robert Clarke The BHnd Ploughman 

Old Irish Air Danny Boy 

(Arranged by Weatherly) 

Pearl Curran Dawn 

Miss Jirak 

V. Charles T. Griffes Two Sketches for String Quartet, 

based on Indian Themes 
I. Lento e mesto (Farewell Song 

of the Chippewa Indians) 
II. Allegro giocoso 
The Swastika Quartet 

'Students of Mr. Loi'is Baillv in Chamber Music 
•*Student of Madame Marcell.\ Sembrich 
***Student of Mr. Josef Hopmann 

•j-Student of Mr. Harry K.\ufman in Accompanying 

The Steinwav is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 



AMhKlUAN AUAUUMI o] MUML. 



GRAND OPERA — SEASON 1929-1930 
WEDNESDAY EVENING, OCTOBER 23rd, AT 8 O'CLOCK 

PHILADELPHIA GRAND OPERA COMPANY 

WILUAM C. HAMMER, General Manager 

CARMEN 

OPERA IN FOUR ACTS 

Text by Henri Meilhac and Ludovic Halevy, From the Story by Prosper Merimee 

(In French) 

Music by Georges Bizet 

DON JOSE RALPH ERROLLE 

ESCAMILLO CHIEF CAUPOLICAN 

DANCAIRO BENIAMINO GROBANI 

REMENDADO ALBERT MAHLER 

ZUNIGA IVAN STESCHENKO 

MORALES ALBERT MAHLER 

MICAELA CHARLOTTE SYMONS 

FRASQUITA HELEN JEPSON 

MERCEDES ROSE B AMPTON 

CARMEN SOPHIE BRASLAU 

Time— 1820. Place— Seville. Spain. 

Incidental D.ince in Act II by Catherine Little6eld, Premiere Danseuse, anJ Misses lannone, Gamson and Schoenberg 

BALLET IN ACT IV 

I. Entr'acte Dorothy Littlefield, Thomas Cannon and Group 

II. Menuet Catherine Littlefield, Premiere Danseuse; Virgil Coiidy and William Dollar 

III. Farandole Entire Corps de Ballet 

Conductor EMIL MLYNARSKI 

Stage Director WILHELM VON WYMETAL, JR. 

SYNOPSIS OF SCENES 
ACT I — Public Square in Seville 
ACT II— The Inn of LiUas Pastia 
ACT III— A Mountain Pass 
ACT IV— Before the Bull Ring in Seville 



HONORARY MUSICAL DIRECTOR LEOPOLD STOKOWSKI 

DIRECTOR MRS. WM. C. HAMMER 

MUSICAL DIRECTOR AND CONDUCTOR EMIL MLYNARSKI 

STAGE DIRECTOR WILHELM VON WYMETAL. Jr. 

ASSISTANT CONDUCTOR AND CHORUS MASTER HENRI ELKAN 

ASSISTANT CONDUCTOR SYLVAN LEVIN 

ASSISTANT STAGE MANAGER CHARLES DEMAREST 

BALLET DIRECTOR CAROLINE LITTLEFIELD 

PREMIERE DANSEUSE CATHERINE LITTLEFIELD 

ORCHESTRA MANAGER ALEXANDER HILSBERG 

PUBLICITY MARGARET M. WALTON 



Scenery Designed by Prof. Alfred Roller, Vienna, and Executed by A. Jarin Studios, Philadelphia. 

Miss Braslau's costumes designed and executed by Faina Mindell. New York. 

Costumes and Wigs by Charles Saake, 1212-1214 North Tenth Street 

The Piano Used is the Henry F. Miller — C. J. Heppe is' Son, Agents, 1 1 19 Chestnut Street. 

NEXT OPERA 

. LE JONGLEUR DE NOTRE DAME 

(In French) 

THURSDAY EVENING, OCTOBER 31, 1929, AT EIGHT 

With the following brilliant cast of lyric artists. Miss Mary Garden, Miss Sally Gibbs; Messrs. Chief 
Caupolican, Ivan Steschenko, John Barclay, Albert Mahler, Beniamino Grobani, Arthur Holmgren. 

Conductor— EMIL MLYNARSKI 
Stage Director— WILHELM VON WYMETAL, JR. 
New scenery and lighting effects designed by Prof. Alfred Roller and executed by A. Jarin Scenic Studio.s. 
Philadelphia. 



NO ADVANCE IN PRICES— ^J.50 to 50c. Tax exempt. Ar Heppe's, 1119 Chestnut Street, and Philadelphia 
Grand Opera Company, 818 Harrison Building, S. W. Cor. 15th and Market Streets. (Telephone, Rittenhouse 3981). 



AMERICAN ACADEMY of MUSIC 



Philadelphia Grand Opera Company 

REPERTOIRE 
1929 — Season — 1930 

(Subject to Change) 



CARMEN (In French)— Wednesday Evening, October 23, 1929 

LE JONGLEUR DE NOTRE DAME (In French)— Thursday Evening, 

October 31, 1929 
MADAMA BUTTERFLY (In Italian)— Thursday Evening, November 14, 1929 
LAKME (In French)— Thursday Evening, November 28, 1929 
UN BALLO IN MASCHERA (In ItaHan)— Monday Evening, December 9, 1929 
IL SERRAGLIO (In ItaHan) 
JUDITH (American Premiere) (Ir 

LOHENGRIN (In German)— Thursday Evening, February 6, 1930 
RIGOLETTO (In Italian)— Thursday Evening, February 20, 1930 
TIEFLAND (In German)— Wednesday Evening, February 26, 1930 
PIQUE DAME (In Russian)— Thursday Evening, March 6, 1930 



[ F 1 M r Thursday Evening, December 26, 1929 



I PAGLIACCI (In Italian) 



, , , , ^Thursday Evening, April 10. 193 
In Italian) J ' & t 



CAVALLERIA RUSTICANA (In Italian) 

AIDA (In Italian)— Thursday Evening, April 24, 1930 

NOTE: — All performances begin at 8 o'clock 

The repertoire for the season 1929-1930 will be interpreted by eminent artists of 
the lyric world, of which the following is a partial list: 
SOPRANOS: Mary Garden, Marianne Gonitch, Josephine Lucchese, Eleanor Painter, 

Selma Amansky, Beatrice Belkin, Natalie Bodanskaya, Agnes Davis, Paceli 

Diamond, Edna Hochstetter, Henrietta Horle, Florence Irons, Helen Jepson, 

Eleanor Lewis, Elsa Meisky, Genia Mirska, Charlotte Symons. 
MEZZO-SOPRANOS: Sophie Braslau, Faina Petrova, Cyrena Van Gordon, Rose 

Bampton, Lucia Chagnon, Josephine Jirak, Berta Levina. 
TENORS: Ralph Errolle, Alexander Kourganoff, Josef Wolinski, Daniel Healy, 

Albert Mahler. 
BARITONES: John Barclay, Chief Caupolican, Giuseppe Martino'Rossi, John Charles 

Thomas, Beniamino Grobani, Arthur Holmgren, Conrad Thibault. 
BASSES: Augusto Ottone, Ivan Steschenko, Clarence Reinert. 

CORPS DE BALLET OF ONE HUNDRED 
Catherine Littlefield, Premiere Danseus'e 

PRICES — Tax Exempt 
0.50, 0.00, ^2.50 ^2.00, 0.50, 0.00, 75 Cents and 50 Cents 

Advance orders for all performances will have prompt attention if sent to office of Philadelphia Grand Opera 
Company, 818 Harrison Building, S. W. Cor. 15th and Market Streets (Telephone: Rittenhouse 3981). Public 
sale of tickets at Heppe's, 1119 Chestnut Street, one week in advance of the dates of the respective performances. 



AMERICAN ACADEMY of MUbIC 



GRAND OPERA — SEASON 1929-1930 
THURSDAY EVENING, OCTOBER 31st, AT 8 O'CLOCK 

PHILADELPHIA GRAND OPERA COMPANY 

WILLIAM C. HVMMER. <;«neral Manager 

Le Jongleur de Notre Dame 

A MIRACLE PLAY IN THREE ACTS 

Adapted by Maurice Lena from a Mediaeval Legend 

(In French) 

Music by Jules Massenet 

JEAN, the Juggler MARY GARDEN 

BONIFACE, the Cook V / CHIEF CAUPOLICAN 

THE PRIOR / \ IVAN STESCHENKO 

THE POET f 1 ALBERT MAHLER 

THE PAINTER /' MONKS < BENIAMINO GROBANI 

THE MUSICIAN ' \ j JOHN BARCLAY 

THE SCULPTOR ,' V ARTHUR HOLMGREN 

THE APPARITION OF THE VIRGIN SALLY GIBBS 

Time— Fourteenth Century. Place— Place dc Cluny, Paris. 

Conductor EMIL MLYNARSKI 

Stage Director WILHELM VON WYMETAL, JR. 

SYNOPSIS OF SCENES 



ACT I. THE MARKET PLACE. 
ACT II. A ROOM IN THE ABBEY. 
ACT III. THE CHAPEL OF THE ABBEY. 



HONORARY MUSICAL DIRECTOR LEOPOLD STOKOWSKI 

DIRECTOR MRS. WM. C. HAMMER 

MUSICAL DIRECTOR AND CONDUCTOR EMIL MLYNARSKI 

STAGE DIRECTOR WILHELM VON WYMETAL, Jr. 

ASSISTANT CONDUCTOR AND CHORUS MASTER HENRI ELKAN 

ASSISTANT CONDUCTOR SYLVAN LEVIN 

ASSISTANT STAGE MANAGER CHARLES DEMAREST 

BALLET DIRECTOR CAROLINE LITTLEFIELD 

PREMIERE DANSEUSE CATHERINE LITTLEFIELD 

ORCHESTRA MANAGER ALEXANDER HILSBERG 

PUBLICITY MARGARET M. WALTON 



Scenery Designed by Prof. Alfred Roller, Vienna, and Executed by A. Jarin 
Costumes and Wigs by Charles Saake, 1212-1214 North Tenth Street 

The Piano Used is the Henry F. Miller — C. J. Heppe &? Son, Agents, 1119 Chestnut Street. 
The Organ Used is the Estey — Estcy Reed Organ Studios, 1702 Walnut Street. 

The Statue in Act II, and its counterpart in Act III, were designed and executed by Mr. Frank B. A. 
Linton, recently decorated by the Government of France with the rank of "Officier d"Academie."' 
The Viola d'Amour used in the Orchestra is from the collection of Dr. Thaddeus Rich. 

NEXT OPERA 

MADAMA BUTTERFLY 

Founded on the Book of John Luther Long and the Drama of David Bclasco 

(In Italian) 

Thursday Evening, November 14th, 1929, at 8 o'clock 

Mmcs. Eleanor Painter, Berta Levina, Helen Jcpson; Mm. Ralph Errollc, John Barclay, Albert Mnhlcr 
Arthur Holmgren, Clarence Reinert, Beniamino Grobani, Abraham Robofsky 

Conductor EMIL MLYNARSKI 

Stage Director WILHELM VON WYMETAL, Jr. 

New scenery designed by Prof. Alfred Roller, of Vienna, and executed by A. Jarin 

PRICES: ^3.50 to 50 Cents — Tax Exempt 

Tickets now on sale at Heppc's, 1119 Chestnut Street, and Philadelphia Grand Opera Company, 818 Harrison 

Building, S. W. Cor. 15th and Market Streets — Telephone: RITtenhouse 3981 



AMERICAN ACADEMY of MUSIC X 



Philadelphia Grand Opera Company 

REPERTOIRE 
1929 — Season — 1930 

(Subject to Change) 



CARMEN (In French)— Wednesday Evening, October 23, 1929 

LE JONGLEUR DE NOTRE DAME (In French)— Thursday Evening, 

October 31, 1929 
MADAMA BUTTERFLY (In Italian)— Thursday Evening, November 14, 1929 
LAKME (In French)— Thursday Evening, November 28, 1929 

I PAGLIACCI (In Italian) It., j i. ■ t^ u o iqoo 

^ ., r . T T T^^x . T^T T^r^T^ A -vT A /T T , X ? M o tt d 3 v E V c n HI g , D c c c HI b c r 9 , 1929 
CAVALLERIA RUSTICANA (In Italian) J > s. 

IL SERRAGLIO (In ItaHan) 

TT Tn>T-rTj- /A ■ T> \ /J T! V u\ ^ Thursday Evening, December 26, 1929 

JUDITH (American Premiere) (In English) ■' " 

LOHENGRIN (In German)— Thursday Evening, February 6, 1930 

RIGOLETTO (In Italian)— Thursday Evening, February 20, 1930 

TIEFLAND (In German)— Wednesday Evening, February 26, 1930 

PIQUE DAME (In Russian)— Thursday Evening, March 6, 1930 

UN BALLO IN MASCHERA (In Italian)— Thursday Evening, April 10, 1930 

AIDA (In Italian)— Thursday Evening, April 24, 1930 

NOTE: — All performances begin at 8 o'clock 

The repertoire for the season 1929-1930 will be interpreted by eminent artists of 

the lyric world, of which the following is a partial hst: 

SOPRANOS: Mary Garden, Marianne Gonitch, Josephine Lucchese, Eleanor Painter, 
Bianca Saroya, Selma Amansky, Beatrice Belkin, Natalie Bodanskaya, Agnes Davis, 
Paceli Diamond, Edna Hochstetter, Henrietta Horle, Florence Irons, Helen Jepson, 
Eleanor Lewis, Elsa Meiskey, Genia Mirska, Charlotte Symons. 

MEZZO-SOPRANOS: Sophie Braslau, Faina Petrova, Cyrena Van Gordon, Rose 
Bampton, Lucia Chagnon, Josephine Jirak, Berta Levina. 

TENORS: Ralph ErroUe, Alexander Kourganoff, Josef Wohnski, Daniel Healy, 
Albert Mahler. 

BARITONES: John Barclay, Chief Caupohcan, Giuseppe Martino'Rossi, John Charles 
Thomas, Beniamino Grobani, Arthur Holmgren, Conrad Thibault. 

BASSES: Augusto Ottone, Ivan Steschenko, Clarence Reinert. 

CORPS DE BALLET OF ONE HUNDRED 
Catherine Littlefield, Premiere Danseuse 

PRICES — Tax Exempt 
^.50, 0.00, ^2.50 ^2.00, 0.50, 0.00, 75 Cents and 50 Cents 

Advance orders for all performances will have prompt attention if sent to office of Philadelpliia Grand Opera 
Company, 818 Harrison Building, S. W. Cor. 15th and Market Streets (Telephone: Rittenhouse 3981). Public 
sale of tickets at Heppe's, 1119 Chestnut Street, one week in advance of the dates of the respective performances. 



AMLKIUAN AL^AUbMI ot MUML. 



GRAND OPERA — SEASON 1929-1930 
THURSDAY EVENING, NOVEMBER 14th, 1929, AT 8 O'CLOCK 

PHILADELPHIA GRAND OPERA COMPANY 

VtlLLIAM C. H VMMKK, <;«-neral Mana^.r 

Madama Butterfly 

OPERA IN TWO ACTS 

Founded on the Book of John Luther Long and the Drama of David Belasco 

(In Itahan) 

Music by GIACOMO PUCCINI 

CIO-CIO-SAN ELEANOR PAINTER 

SUZUKI BERTA LEVINA 

KATE PINKERTON HELEN JEPSON 

B. F. PINKERTON RALPH ERROLLE 

SHARPLESS JOHN BARCLAY 

GORO ALBERT MAHLER 

THE EONZE ' ..CLARENCE REINERT 

PRINCE YAMADORI ARTHUR HOLMGREN 

IMPERIAL COMMISSIONER BENIAMINO GROBANI 

OFFICIAL REGISTRAR ABRAHAM ROBOFSKY 

TROUBLE (Cio-Cio-San's Child) JOAN SMITH 

Time: The Present. Place: Nagasaki. Japan. 

CONDUCTOR EMIL MLYNARSKI 

STAGE DIRECTOR WILHELM VON WYMETAL, Jr. 

SYNOPSIS OF SCENES 
ACT I — The garden of Cio-Cio-San's house. 
ACT II — Scene 1: A room in Cio-Cio-San's house. Night. 
Scene 2: The same. Dawn. 

HONORARY MUSICAL DIRECTOR LEOPOLD STOKOWSKI 

DIRECTOR MRS. WM. C. HAMMER 

MUSICAL DIRECTOR AND CONDUCTOR EMIL MLYNARSKI 

STAGE DIRECTOR WILHELM VON WYMETAL, Jr. 

ASSISTANT CONDUCTOR AND CHORUS MASTER HENRI ELKAN 

ASSISTANT CONDUCTOR SYLVAN LEVIN 

ASSISTANT STAGE MANAGER CHARLES DEMAREST 

BALLET DIRECTOR CAROLINE LITTLEFIELD 

PREMIERE DANSEUSE CATHERINE LITTLEFIELD 

ORCHESTRA MANAGER ALEXANDER HILSBERG 

PUBLICITY MARGARET M. WALTON 

Scenery designed by Prof. Alfred Roller, Vienna, iind executed by A. Jarin Scenic Studios, Philadelphia. 

Costumes by Charles Saake, 1212-1214 North 10th Street, Philadelphia. 
Wigs by William Punzel, New York. 

The Piano used is the Henry F. Miller — C. J. Heppe is' Son, Agents, 1119 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia. 

NEXT OPERA 

THURSDAY (THANKSGIVING) EVENING 
NOVEMBER 28th, 1929, at 8.15 O'CLOCK 

L A K M E 

Mmes. Josephine Lucchese, Lucia Chagnon, Helen Jepson, Agnes Davis, Rose Bampton; Mm. Ralph Errolle, 

John Barclay, Ivan Steschenko, Albert Mahler, Arthur Holmgren, Daniel Healy, Abraham Robofsky; Catherine 

Littlefield, Premiere Danseuse and entire Corps de Ballet 

Conductor EMIL MLYNARSKI 

Stage Director "WILHELM VON WYMETAL, Jr. 



New scenery designed by Prof. Alfred Roller, Vienna, and executed by A. Jarin Scenic Studios, Philadelphia. 
NO ADVANCE IN PRICES: ^.50 to 50 Cents— Tax Exempt. Tickets on sale at Heppe's, 1119 Chestnut Street, 
and Philadelphia Grand Opera Company Office, 818 Harrison Building, S. W. Cor. 15th and Market Streets 

(Telephone: RITtenhouse 3981) 



AMbKlL.AN AUAUtMY of MUblU 



Philadelphia Grand Opera Company 

REPERTOIRE 

1929 — Season — 1930 

(Subject to Change) 

CARMEN (In French)— Wednesday Evening, October 23, 1929 

LE JONGLEUR DE NOTRE DAME (In French)— Thursday Evening, 

October 31, 1929 
MADAMA BUTTERFLY (In ItaHan)— Thursday Evening, November 14, 1929 
LAKME (In French) — Thursday Evening, November 28, 1929 

*I PAGLIACCI (In Italian) ^^^ t. , 

/-• A\r AT T cnr A r.1 TCT-T/^ AXT A /T T 1- \ ? Monday E vcning, Dcccmber 9, 1 929 

CAVALLERIA RUSTICANA (In Italian) j ' &' 

IL SERRAGLIO (In Italian) 

TT TriTTT-r /A™ „■ D \ /T c 1- i.\ f Thursdav Evening, December 26, 1929 

JUDim (American fremiere) (In English) ' z &' 

LOHENGRIN (In German)— Thursday Evening, February 6, 1930 

RIGOLETTO (In Italian)— Thursday Evening, February 20, 1930 

TIEFLAND (In German) — Wednesday Evening, February 26, 1930 

PIQUE DAME (In Russian)— Thursday Evening, March 6, 1930 

*UN BALLO IN MASCHERA (In Italian)— Thursday Evening, April 10, 1930 

AIDA (In Italian)— Thursday Evening, April 24, 1930 

*Please note change in schedule. 

NOTE: — All performances begin at 8.15 o'clock 

The repertoire for the season 1929-1930 will be interpreted by eminent artists of 

the lyric world, of which the following is a partial list: 

SOPRANOS: Mary Garden, Marianne Gonitch, Nanette Guilford, Josephine Lucchese, 
Eleanor Painter, Bianca Saroya, Selma Amansky, Beatrice Belkin, Natalie Bodan- 
skaya, Agnes Davis, Paceli Diamond, Edna Hochstetter, Henrietta Horle, Flor- 
ence Irons, Helen Jepson, Eleanor Lewis, Elsa Meiskey, Genia Mirska, Charlotte 
Symons. 

MEZZO-SOPRANOS: Sophie Braslau, Faina Petrova, Cyrena Van Gordon, Rose 
Bampton, Lucia Chagnon, Josephine Jirak, Berta Levina. 

TENORS: Ralph Errolle, Alexandre Kourganoff, Josef Wolinski, Daniel Healy, 
Albert Mahler. 

BARITONES: John Barclay, Chief Caupolican, Giuseppe Martino-Rossi, John Charles 
Thomas, Beniamino Grobani, Arthur Holmgren, Conrad Thibault. 

BASSES: Augusto Ottone, Ivan Steschenko, Clarence Reinert. 

CORPS DE BALLET OF ONE HUNDRED 
Catherine Littlefield, Premiere Danseuse 

^>:^^ 

PRICES — Tax Exempt 
^3.50, ^3.00, ^2.50 ^2.00, ^1.50, ^1.00, 75 Cents and 50 Cents 

Advance orders for all performances will have prompt attention if sent to office of Philadelphia Grand Opera 
Company, 818 Harrison Building, S. W. Cor. 15th and Market Streets (Telephone: Rittenhouse 3981). Public 
sale of tickets at Heppe's, 1119 Chestnut Street, one week in advance of the dates of the respective performances. 



AMbKICAN AL-AUtMI of MU5H^ 



GRAND OPERA — SEASON 1929-1930 
THURSDAY EVENING, NOVEMBER 28, 1929, AT 8.15 O'CLOCK 

PHILADELPHIA GRAND OPERA COMPANY 

WILLIAM C. HAMMER, (General Manager 

LAKME 

opera in Three Acts 

Text by Edmond Gondinet and Philippe Gille, from the story "Le Mariage de Loti" 

(In French) 
Music by Leo DeHbes 

LAKMK lOSEPHINE LUCCHESE 

NILAKANTHA IVAN STESCHENKO 

GERALD RALPH ERROLLE 

FREDERICK MARIO VALLE 

MALLIKA LUCIA CHAGNON 

HAD II ALBERT MAHLER 

ELLEN HELEN JEPSON 

ROSE AGNES DAVIS 

MRS. BENSOn' ■.'.■.■.■.■.■.■.".■.'.■.■.■ ROSE BAMPTON 

A FORTUNE TELLER ARTHUR HOLMGREN 

A CHINESE MERCHANT DANIEL HEALY 

A THIEF ABRAHAM ROBOFSKY 

Dances by Catherine Littleficld, Premiere Danseiise and Corps de Ballet 
Time— Middle of 14th Century. Place — India. 

CONDUCTOR EMIL MLYNARSKI 

STAGE DIRECTOR WILHELM VON WYMETAL, JR. 

SYNOPSIS OF SCENES 

ACT I — A temple garden. 

ACT II — A public square. 

ACT III— A forest refuf^e. 

HONORARY MUSICAL DIRECTOR LEOPOLD STOKOWSKI 

DIRECTOR MRS. WM. C. HAMMER 

MUSICAL DIRECTOR AND CONDUCTOR EMIL MLYNARSKI 

STAGE DIRECTOR WILHELM VON WYMETAL. Jr. 

ASSISTANT CONDUCTOR AND CHORUS MASTER HENRI ELKAN 

ASSISTANT CONDUCTOR SYLVAN LEVIN 

ASSISTANT STAGE MANAGER CHARLES DEMAREST 

BALLET DIRECTOR CAROLINE LITTLEFIELD 

PREMIERE DANSEUSE CATHERINE LITTLEFIELD 

ORCHESTRA MANAGER ALEXANDER HILSBERG 

PUBLICITY MARGARET M. WALTON 

Scenery designed by Prof. Alfred Roller, Vienna, and executed by A. Jarin Scenic Studios, Philadelphia. 

Costumes by Charles Saake, 1212-1214 North 10th Street, Philadelphia. 

Wigs by William Punzel, New York 

The Piano used is the Henry F. Miller — C. J. Heppe & Son, Agents, 1119 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia. 

NEXT PERFORMANCE— DOUBLE BILL 
MONDAY EVENING, DECEMBER 9, 1929, AT 8.15 O'CLOCK 

CAVALLERIA RUSTICANA 

Mmes. Bianca Saroya, Genia Mirska, Rose Bampton; Mm. Josef Wolinski, Giuseppe Martino-Rossi 

To Be Followed by 



I PAGLIACCI 



Mme. Nanette Guilford (Courtesy of Mr. Giulio Gatti-Casazza, General Manager, Metropolitan Opera Company); 
Mm. Alexandre Kourganwif (Debut in America), John Charles Thomas, Albert Mahler, Conrad Thibauk. 

CONDUCTOR EMIL MLYNARSKI 

STAGE DIRECTOR WILHELM VON WYMENTAL, JR. 

NO ADVANCE IN PRICES: ^3.50 to 50 Cents — ^Tax Exempt. Tickets on sale at Heppe's, 1119 Chestnut Street, 
and Philadelphia Grand Opera Company Office, 818 Harrison Building, S. W. Cor. 15th and Market Streets 

(Telephone: RITtenhouse 3981) 



AMtKlCAN ACADEMY of MUblC 



Philadelphia Grand Opera Company 

REPERTOIRE 

1 929 — Season — 1 930 

(Suhject to Change) 

CARMEN (In French)— Wednesday Evening, October 23, 1929 

LE JONGLEUR DE NOTRE DAME (In French)— Thursday Evening, 

October 31, 1929 

MAD AM A BUTTERFLY (In ItaUan)— Thursday Evening, November 14, 1929 

LAKME (In French) — Thursday Evening, November 28, 1929 

*I PAGLIACCI (In Italian) ^ ., , r. 

/-. Air AT T rr.T A ni TCT-T/^ A>T A /T T 1- V ? Mon day E vcttin g, Dccembcr 9, 1929 

CAVALLERIA RUSTICANA (In Itahan) j -^ e.' 

IL SERRAGLIO (In Itahan) \ 

TT TT^TT^xj / & ~ D x/T Tj ii,\ f Thursday Evening, December 26, 1929 

JUDITH {American Fremiere) (In English) j ' &' 

LOHENGRIN (In German)— Thursday Evening, February 6, 1930 

RIGOLETTO (In Italian)— Thursday Evening, February 20, 1930 

TIEFLAND (In German)— Wednesday Evening, February 26, 1930 

PIQUE DAME (In Russian)— Thursday Evening, March 6, 1930 

*UN BALLO IN MASCHERA (In Italian)— Thursday Evening, April 10, 1930 

AIDA (In Italian)— Thursday Evening, April 24, 1930 

*Please note change in schedule. 

NOTE: — All performances begin at 8.15 o'clock 

The repertoire for the season 1929'1930 will be interpreted by eminent artists of 

the lyric world, of which the following is a partial list: 

SOPRANOS: Mary Garden, Marianne Gonitch, Nanette Guilford, Josephine Lucchese, 
Eleanor Painter, Bianca Saroya, Selma Amansky, Beatrice Belkin, Natalie Bodan- 
skaya, Agnes Davis, Paceli Diamond, Edna Hochstetter, Henrietta Horle, Flor- 
ence Irons, Helen Jepson, Eleanor Lewis, Elsa Meiskey, Genia Mirska, Charlotte 
Symons. 

MEZZO-SOPRANOS: Sophie Braslau, Faina Petrova, Cyrena Van Gordon, Rose 
Bampton, Lucia Chagnon, Josephine Jirak, Berta Levina. 

TENORS: Ralph Errolle, Alexandre Kourganotf, Josef Wolinski, Alessandro Angelucci, 
Daniel Healy, Albert Mahler. 

BARITONES: John Barclay, Chief CaupoHcan, Giuseppe Martino'Rossi, John Charles 

Thomas, Mario Valle, Beniamino Grobani, Arthur Holmgren, Abraham Robofsky, 
Conrad Thibault. 
BASSES: Augusto Ottone, Ivan Steschenko, Clarence Reinert. 

CORPS DE BALLET OF ONE HUNDRED 
Catherine Littlefield, Premiere Danseuse 

PRICES — Tax Exempt 
^3.50, ^3.00, ^2.50 ^2.00, ^1.50, ^1.00, 75 Cents and 50 Cents 

Advance orders for all performances will have prompt attention if sent to office of Philadelphia Grand Opera 
Company, 818 Harrison Building, S. W. Cor. 15th and Market Streets (Telephone: Rittenhouse 3981). Public 
sale of tickets at Heppe's, 1119 Chestnut Street, one week in advance of the dates of the respective performances. 



AMtKlUAN AUAULMl of MU:)1L. 



GRAND OPERA — SEASON 1929-1930 
MONDAY EVENING, DECEMBER 9, 1929, AT 8.15 O'CLOCK 

PHILADELPHIA GRAND OPERA COMPANY 

WILLIAM C. HAMMER. General Manager 

CAVALLERIA RUSTICANA 

OPERA IN ONE ACT 
Text by Giovanni Targioni-Toggetti and Guido Menasci from the story by Giovanni Verga 

(In Italian) 
Music by PIETRO MASCAGNI 

TURIDDU JOSEF WOLINSKI 

ALFIO GIUSEPPE MARTINO-ROSSI 

LOLA GENIA WILKOMIRSKA 

mamma'lucia' .■:::::: :::::: ::.■.■.■.■ -^^llf^f^rrSr^. 

SANTUZ2A BIANCA SAROYA 

Scene — The Public Square of a Village in Sicily 

To be followed by * 



PAGLIACCI 



OPERA IN TWO ACTS, WITH A PROLOGUE 

(In Italian) 
Text and Music by RUGGIERO LEONCAVALLO 

NEDDA NANETTE GUILFORD 

(Courtesy of Metropolitan Opera Company) 

CANIO ALEXANDRE KOURGANOFF 

(Debut in America) 

TONIO JOHN CHARLES THOMAS 

BEPPE ALBERT MAHLER 

SILVIO '.'.".'.'.".".".' CONRAD THIBAULT 

SYNOPSIS OF SCENES 
ACT I — Outskirts of a Village in Calabria — Afternoon. 
ACT II— The Same— Evening. 

CONDUCTOR EMIL MLYNARSKI 

STAGE DIRECTOR WILHELM VON WYMETAL, Jr. 

HONORARY MUSICAL DIRECTOR LEOPOLD STOKOWSKI 

DIRECTOR MRS. WM. C. HAMMER 

MUSICAL DiREctoR AND CONDUCTOR EMIL MLYNARSKI 

STAGE DIRECTOR WILHELM VON WYMETAL, Jr. 

ASSISTANT CONDUCTOR AND CHORUS MASTER HENRI ELKAN 

ASSISTANT CONDUCTOR SYLVAN LEVIN 

ASSISTANT STAGE MANAGER CHARLES DAMAREST 

BALLET DIRECTOR CAROLINE LITTLEFIELD 

PREMIERE DANSEUSE CATHERINE LITTLEFIELD 

ORCHESTRA MANAGER ALEXANDER HILSBERG 

PUBLICITY MARGARET M. WALTON 

Scenery designed and executed by A. Jarin Scenic Studios, Philadelphia. 

Costumes by Charles Saake, 1212-1214 North 10th Street, Philadelphia. 

Wigs by William Pumel, New York. 

The Piano used is the Henry F. Miller — C. J. Heppe 3C Son, Agents, 1119 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia. 

The Organ used is the Estey — Estey Reed Organ Studios, 1702 Walnut Street, Philadelphia. 

NEXT PERFORMANCE— DOUBLE BILL 

Thursday Evening, December 26, 1929, at 8.15 o'CIock 
AMERICAN PREMIERE OF EUGENE GOOSSENS' OPERA 

JUDITH 

(In English) 
Mmes. Bianca Saroya, Berta Levina. Mm. Ralph Errolle, Ivan Steschenko, Carroll Ault. 
Dances by Catherine Littlefield, Premiere Danseuse, and Corps de Ballet. 

CONDUCTOR EUGENE GOOSSENS 

STAGE DIRECTOR WILHELM VON WYMETAL, Jr. 

To Be Followed by 
FIRST PERFORMANCE IN PHILADELPHIA OF MOZART'S OPERA 



IL SERRAGLIO 



(In Italian) 
Mmes. Josephine Lucchese, Beatrice Belkin. Mm. Josef Wolinskl, Ivan Steschenko, Mario Valle, Albert Mahler 

CONDUCTOR EMIL MLYNARSKI 

STAGE DIRECTOR WILHELM VON WYMETAL, Jr. 

NO ADVANCE IN PRICES: $3.50 to 50 Cents— Ta.v E.xempt. Tickets on sale at Heppe's, 1119 Chestnut Street, 
and Philadelphia Grand Opera Company Office, 818 Harrison Building, S. W. Cor. 15th and Market Streets 

(Telephone: RITtenhouse 3981) 



AMLKIUAN AUAUhMY of MUbiC |X 

Philadelphia Grand Opera Company 

REPERTOIRE 

1 929 — Season — 1 930 

(Subject to Change) 

CARMEN (In French)— Wednesday Evening, October 23, 1929 

LE JONGLEUR DE NOTRE DAME (In French)— Thursday Evening, 

October 31, 1929 
MADAMA BUTTERFLY (In Italian)— Thursday Evening, November 14, 1929 
LAKME (In French) — Thursday Evening, November 28. 1929 



[►Monday Evening, December 9, 1929 



PAGLIACCI (In Italian) 

CAVALLERIA RUSTICANA (In Italian) 

IL SERRAGLIO (In ItaUan) \ 

TTT-n.TTTj- I A T> • \ / T Tj 1 • u \ f Thursday Evening, December 26, 1929 

JUDITH {American Premiere) (In English) j ' ^' 

LOHENGRIN (In German)— Thursday Evening, February 6, 1930 

RIGOLETTO (In Italian)— Thursday Evening, February 20, 1930 

TIEFLAND (In German)— Wednesday Evening, February 26, 1930 

PIQUE DAME (In Russian)— Thursday Evening, March 6, 1930 

UN BALLO IN MASCHERA (In Itahan)— Thursday Evening, April 10, 1930 

AIDA (In Itahan)- Thursday Evening, April 24, 1930 

NOTE: — All performances begin at 8.H o'clock 

The repertoire for the season 1929-1930 will be interpreted by eminent artists of 
the lyric world, of which the following is a partial list: 
SOPRANOS: Mary Garden, Marianne Gonitch, Nanette Guilford, Josephine Lucchese, 

Eleanor Painter, Bianca Saroya, Selma Amansky, Beatrice Belkin, Natalie Bodan- 

skaya, Agnes Davis, Paceli Diamond, Edna Hochstetter, Henrietta Horle, Flor- 

ence Irons, Helen Jepson, Eleanor Lewis, Elsa Meiskey, Charlotte Symons, 

Genia Wilkomirska. 
MEZZO-SOPRANOS: Sophie Braslau, Faina Petrova, Cyrena Van Gordon, Rose 

Bampton, Lucia Chagnon, Josephine Jirak, Berta Levina. 
TENORS: Ralph Errolle, Alexandre Kourganoff, Josef WoHnski, Alessandro Angelucci, 

Daniel Healy, Albert Mahler. 
BARITONES: Carroll Ault, John Barclay, Chief Caupohcan, Giuseppe Martino-Rossi, 

John Charles Thomas, Mario Valle, Beniamino Grobani, Arthur Holmgren, 

Abraham Robofsky, Conrad Thibault. 
BASSES: Augusto Ottone, Ivan Steschenko, Clarence Reinert. 

CORPS DE BALLET OF ONE HUNDRED 
Catherine Littlefield, Premiere Danseuse 

..^^^ 

PRICES — Tax Exempt 
^3.50, ^3.00, ^2.50 ^2.00, ^1.50, ^1.00, 75 Cents and 50 Cents 

Advance orders for all performances will have prompt attention if sent to oflScc of Philadelphia Grand Opera 
Company, 818 Harrison Building, S. W. Cor. 15th and Market Streets (Telephone: Rittenhouse 3981). Public 
sale of tickets at Heppe's, 1119 Chestnut Street, one week in advance of the dates of the respective performances. 



/\MnKl^/\iN /\L>/\UJ::iVi 1 o] iViuoiL. 



GRAND OPERA — SEASON 1929 - 1930 
THURSDAY EVENING, DECEMBER 26, 1929, AT 8.15 O'CLOCK 

PHILADELPHIA GRAND OPERA COMPANY 

\X II.LI \M <:. H VMMKH. (;entTal Mana^.r 

The Philadelphia Grand Opera Company has the honor 
of presenting, for the first time in America 



JUDITH 



Opera in One Act 

Text by Arnold Bennett, from the Book of Judith 

(One of the fourteen Apochryphal Books of The Bible) 

(In English) 

Music by Eugene Goossens 

JUDITH BIANCA SAROYA 

HAGGITH, her servant BERTA LEVINA 

HOLOFERNES. an Assyrian general IVAN STESCHENKO 

BAGOAS, his chief eunuch RALPH ERROLE 

ACHIOR, a captain in Holofernes" army CARROLL AULT 

Dances by CATHERINE LITTLEFIELD, Premiere Danseuse, and the Misses Zeller, Axford, Flynn, Loewenthal. 
Campbell, Smythe, lonone. Cohen, Roncase, Jacob, Garrity, Gamson. Guards — Thomas Cannon, Virgil Coudy. 

CONDUCTOR EUGENE GOOSSENS 

STAGE DIRECTOR WTLHELM von WYMETAL. JR. 

To be followed by 
First Performance in Philadelphia of 



IL SERRAGLIO 



(In Italian) 
Opera in Three Acta 
Text from the story Belmont und Constanze, by Christoph Friedrich Bretzner 
MUSIC BY WOLFGANG AMADEUS MOZART 

CONSTANCE HARRIET VAN EMDEN 

BLONDA NATALIE BODANSKAYA 

BELMONT JOSEF WOLINSKI 

OSMIN IVAN STESCHENKO 

PEDRILLO ALBERT MAHLER 

SELIM MARIO VALLE 

AN OFFICER ALESSANDRO ANGELUCCI 

CONDUCTOR EMIL MLYNARSKI 

c-T-Az-c i-,iDcr>-r/^D w/impixj WV\/fFTAT IR 



Miss Harriet van Emden has kindly con' 
sented to sing the role of Constance m 
II Serraglio, in place of Miss Josephine 
Lucchese, who, on account of illness, is 
unable to appear. 



DECEMBER 26. 1929 



Philadelphia Grand Opera Company 

REPERTOIRE 

1 929 — Season — 1 930 

(^Subject to Change) 

CARMEN (In French)— Wednesday Evening, October 23, 1929 

LE JONGLEUR DE NOTRE DAME (In French)— Thursday Evening, 

October 31, 1929 
MADAMA BUTTERFLY (In Italian)— Thursday Evening, November 14. 1929 
LAKME (In French) — Thursday Evening, November 28, 1929 



>^Monday Evening, December 9, 1929 



PAGLIACCI (In Italian) 

CAVALLERIA RUSTICANA (In Italian) 

IL SERRAGLIO (In ItaHan) \ 

TTTrNT-ru /A D ■ \ /T vt V u\ r Thursday Evening, December 26, 1929 

JUDITH (American Premiere) (In English) j •' «" 

LOHENGRIN (In German)— Thursday Evening, February 6, 1930 

RIGOLETTO (In Italian)— Thursday Evening, February 20, 1930 

TIEFLAND (In German)— Wednesday Evening, February 26, 1930 

PIQUE DAME (In Russian)— Thursday Evening, March 6, 1930 

UN BALLO IN MASCHERA (In Italian)— Thursday Evening, April 10, 1930 

AID A (In Itahan )— Thursday Evening, April 24, 1930 

NOTE: — All performances begin at 8.1? o'clock 

The repertoire for the season 1929' 19 30 will be interpreted by eminent artists of 
the lyric world, of which the following is a partial Hst: 
SOPRANOS: Mary Garden, Marianne Gonitch, Nanette Guilford, Josephine Lucchese, 

Eleanor Painter, Bianca Saroya, Selma Amansky, Beatrice Belkin, Natalie Bodan' 

skaya, Agnes Davis, PaceH Diamond, Edna Hochstetter, Henrietta Horle. Flnr. 

ence Irons, Helen Jepson, Eleanor Lewis, RUa ^'r-■-' 

Genia Wilkomirska 



American ACAX)EMT^of uubi^ 



GRAND OPERA — SEASON 1929 - 1930 
THURSDAY EVENING, DECEMBER 26. 1929. AT 8.15 O'CLOCK 

PHILADELPHIA GRAND OPERA COMPANY 

\»II.I,I\M <-. HVMMKK. <;.ntriil Manas< r 

The Philadelphia Grand Opera Company has the honor 
of presenting, for the first time in America 



JUDITH 



opera in One Act 

Text by Arnold Bennett, from the Book of Judith 

(One of the fourteen Apochryphal Books of The Bible) 

(In English) 

Music by Eugene Goossens 
rnniTH bianca saroya 

HAGGITH ■ her' servant .........■.■.■.■.■..■.".■.■.■ BERTA LEVINA 

HOLOFERNES. an Assyrian general IVAN STESCHENKO 

BAGOAS. his chief eunuch •J?-i\J-n St t a t9t I 

ACHIOR, a captain in Holofernes" army CARROLL AULl 

Dances by CATHERINE LITTLEFIELD, Premiere Danseuse, and the Misses Zeller. Axford. Flynn, Loewenthal, 
Campbell, Smythe, lonone, Cohen, Roncase, Jacob, Garrity, Gamson. Guards — Thomas Cannon, Virgil Coudy. 

CONDUCTOR EUGENE GOOSSENS 

STAGE DIRECTOR WILHELM von WYMETAL, JR. 

To be followed by 
First Performance in Philadelphia of 



IL SERRAGLIO 



(In Italian) 
Opera in Three Acts 
Text from the story Belmont und Constanze, by Christoph Fnedrich Bretzner 
MUSIC BY WOLFGANG AMADEUS MOZART 

CONSTANCE HARRIET VAN EMDEN 

BLONDA NATALIE BODANSKAYA 

BELMONT ■. . .". ..■.■-■ JOSEF WOLINSKI 

OSMIN . IVAN STESCHENKO 

PEDRILLO .■..■.■.■.■.'..■.■. ALBERT MAHLER 

SELIM MARIO VALLE 

AN OFFICER ALESSANDRO ANGELUCCI 

CONDUCTOR EMIL MLYNARSKI 

STAGE DIRECTOR WILHELM von WYMETAL, JR. 

HONORARY MUSICAL DIRECTOR LEOPOLD STOKOWSKI 

DIRECTOR MRS. WM. C. HAMMER 

MUSICAL DIRECTOR AND CONDUCTOR EMIL MLYNARSKI 

STAGE DIRECTOR WILHELM von WYMETAL, JR. 

ASSISTANT CONDUCTOR AND CHORUS MASTER HENRI ELKAN 

ASSISTANT CONDUCTOR SYLVAN LEVIN 

ASSISTANT STAGE MANAGER CHARLES DEMAREST 

BALLET DIRECTOR CAROLINE LITTLEFIELD 

PREMIERE DANSEUSE CATHERINE LITTLEFIELD 

ORCHESTRA MANAGER ALEXANDER HILSBERG 

PUBLICITY MARGARET M. WALTON 

Scenery designed and e.vecuted by A. Jarin Scenic Studios, Philadelphia 

Costumes by Charles Saake, 1212-1214 North 10th Street, Philadelphia. 

Wigs by William Punzel, New York. 

The Piano used is the Henry F. Miller — C. J. Heppe & Son, Agents, 1119 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia. 

The Organ used is the Estey — Estey Reed Cfcgan Studies, 1702 Walnut Street, Philadelphia. 

NEXT PERFORMANCE 
Thursday Evening, February 6, 1930, at 8 o'clock precisely 

LOHENGRIN 

(In German) 
-Ml star cast, including Mmc. Marianne Gonitch, Mm. Josef Wolinski, Chief Caupolican, Augusto Ottone 

CONDUCTOR EMIL MLYNARSKI 

STAGE DIRECTOR WILHELM von WYMETAL, JR. 

NO ADVANCE IN PRICES: S3. 50 to 50 cents (ta.x exempt). Tickets on sale at Heppe's, 1119 Chestnut 
Street, and Philadelphia Grand Opera Company Office, 818 Harrison Building. S. W. Cor. 15th and Market Streets, 
(Telephone RITtenhouse 3981). 



AMERICAN ACAUtMT of MUblC « 



Philadelphia Grand Opera Company 

REPERTOIRE 

1 929 — Season — 1 930 

(Suhject to Change) 

CARMEN (In French)— Wednesday Evening, October 23, 1929 

LE JONGLEUR DE NOTRE DAME (In French)— Thursday Evening, 

October 31, 1929 
MADAMA BUTTERFLY (In Italian)— Thursday Evening, November 14. 1929 
LAKME (In French) — Thursday Evening, November 28, 1929 

PAGLIACCI (In Italian) 1 w , t, • t^ ,_ « ,o.. 

/-.A^rATTCDT A D I T c T^T/-. A vT A /T T 1- \ ^Monday Evcning, Deccmber 9, 1929 
CAVALLERIA RUSTICANA (In Italian) J 

IL SERRAGLIO (In Italian) \ 

TnTMT-xj /A n \/TDiu\ f Thutsday Evening, December 26, 1929 

JUDITH {Amencan Premiere) (In Enghsh) J ' &' 

LOHENGRIN (In German)— Thursday Evening, February 6, 1930 

RIGOLETTO (In Italian)— Thursday Evening, February 20, 1930 

TIEFLAND (In German)— Wednesday Evening, February 26, 1930 

PIQUE DAME (In Russian)— Thursday Evening, March 6, 1930 

UN BALLO IN MASCHERA (In Itahan)— Thursday Evening, April 10, 1930 

AIDA (In Italian)— Thursday Evening, April 24, 1930 

The repertoire for the season 1929-1930 will be interpreted by eminent artists of 
the lyric world, of which the following is a partial Ust: 

SOPRANOS: Mary Garden, Marianne Gonitch, Nanette Guilford, Josephine Lucchese. 
Eleanor Painter, Bianca Saroya, Harriet van Emden, Selma Amansky, Beatrice 
Belkin, NataUe Bodanskaya, Agnes Davis, Paceli Diamond, Edna Hochstetter, 
Henrietta Horle, Florence Irons, Helen Jepson, Eleanor Lewis, Elsa Meiskey, 
Charlotte Symons, Genia Wilkomirska. 

MEZZO-SOPRANOS: Sophie Braslau, Faina Petrova, Cyrena Van Gordon, Rose 

Bampton, Lucia Chagnon, Josephine Jirak, Berta Levina. 
TENORS: Ralph Errolle, Alexandre Kourganoff, Josef Wolinski, Alessandro Angelucci, 

Daniel Healy, Albert Mahler. 

BARITONES: Carroll Ault, John Barclay, Chief Caupolican, Giuseppe Martino-Rossi, 
John Charles Thomas, Mario Valle, Beniamino Grobani, Arthur Holmgren. 
Abraham Robofsky, Conrad Thibault. 

BASSES: Augusto Ottone, Ivan Steschenko, Clarence Reinert. 

CORPS DE BALLET OF ONE HUNDRED 
Catherine Littlefield, Premiere Danseuse 



PRICES — Tax Exempt 
^3.50, ^3.00, ^2.50 ^2.00, ^1.50, ^1.00, 75 Cents and 50 Cents 

Advance ordera for all performances will have prompt attention if sent to office of Philadelphia Grand Opera 
Company, 818 Harrison Building, S. W. Cor. 15th and Market Streets (Telephone: Rittenhouse 3981). Public 
m1« oI tickets at Heppe's, 1119 Chestnut Street, one week in advance of the dates of the respective performances. 



AMLKIUAN ACAJJhMl of MUML. 



GRAND OPERA — SEASON 1929 • 1930 
THURSDAY EVENING, FEBRUARY 6. 1Q30. AT 8 O'CLOCK 

PHILADELPHIA GRAND OPERA COMPANY 

\^7LLIAM C. HAMMER, General Manaaer 

LOHENGRIN 

OPERA IN THREE ACTS 

(In German) 

Text and Music by RICHARD WAGNER 

KING HENRY AUGUSTO OTTONE 

LOHENGRIN JOSEF WOLINSKI 

ELSA OF BRABANT MARIANNE GONITCH 

ORTRUD MARGARET MATZENAUER 

(Courtesy of Metropolitan Opera Company) 

TELRAMUND CHIEF CAUPOLICAN 

THE KINGS HERALD LEO DE HIERAPOLIS 

)SELMA AMANSKY 
AGNES DAVIS 
RUTH GORDON 
^ HELEN JEPSON 

GOTTFRIED. Elsas Brother BERNICE DOLLARTON 

TIME: First half of the Tenth Century. PLACE: Antwerp. 

CONDUCTOR EMIL MLYNARSKI 

STAGE DIRECTOR WILHELM von W^MET.\L, Jr. 

SYNOPSIS OF SCENES 
ACT I. Banks of the River Scheldt, near Antwerp. 
ACT II. E.xterior of the Palace. 
ACT III. Scene 1— Elsas Bridal Chamber. 
Scene 2 — Same as Act I. 

HONORARY MUSICAL DIRECTOR LEOPOLD STOKOWSKI 

DIRECTOR MRS. WM. C. HAMMER 

MUSICAL DIRECTOR AND CONDUCTOR EMIL MLYNARSKI 

STAGE DIRECTOR WILHELM von WYMETAL, JR. 

ASSISTANT CONDUCTOR AND CHORUS MASTER HENRI ELKAN 

ASSISTANT CONDUCTOR SYLVAN LEVIN 

ASSISTANT STAGE MANAGER CHARLES DhMARcST 

BALLET DIRECTOR CAROLINE LITTLEFIELD 

PREMIERE DANSEUSE CATHERINE LITTLEFIELD 

ORCHESTRA MANAGER ALEX.ANDER HILSBERG 

PUBLICITY MARGARET M. WALTON 

Scenery designed by Prof. .Alfred Roller, Vienna, and e.\ecuted by A. Jarin Scenic Srudlos, Philadelphia. 

Costumes by Consolidated Theatrical Costume Company, New Y'ork. 

Wigs by William Punzel, New York. 

The Piano used is the Henry F. Miller — C. J. Hcppe & Son, Agents, 1119 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia. 

The Organ used is the Estey — Estey Reed C>rgan Studies, 1702 Walnut Street, Philadelphia. 

NEXT PERFORMANCE 

THURSDAY EVENING, FEBRUARY 20, 1930, AT 8.15 O'CLOCK 

RIGOLETTO 

(In Italian) 

Mmes. Josephine Lucchese, Josephine Jirak, Paceli Diamond, Henrietta Horle, Selma Amansky 

Mm. Josef Wolinski, John Charles Thomas, Ivan Steschenko, Bcniamino Grobani, Conrad Thibauh 

Albert Mahler, Alfred De Long, Alessandro Angelucci 

CONDUCTOR EMIL MLYNARSKI 

STAGE DIRECTOR WILHELM von WYMETAL, JR. 

NO ADVANCE IN PRICES: S3. 50 to 50 cents (ta.x exempt). Tickets on sale at Heppes. 1119 Chestnut 
Street, and Philadelphia Grand Opera Company Office, 818 Harrison Building, S. \\'. Cor. l^th and Market Streets. 
(Telephone RITtenhouse 5981). 



AMERICAN AUAUtMY of MUblC 



Philadelphia Grand Opera Company 

REPERTOIRE 

1 929 — Season — 1 930 

(^Subject to Change) 

CARMEN (In French)— Wednesday Evening, October 23, 1929 

LE JONGLEUR DE NOTRE DAME (In French)— Thursday Evening, 

October 31, 1929 

MADAMA BUTTERFLY (In Itahan)— Thursday Evening, November 14, 1929 

LAKME (In French)— Thursday Evening, November 28. 1929 

PAGLIACCI (In Italian) \>^ j u -n u o ,qoo 

„ ^Monday Evening, December 9, 1929 

CAVALLERIA RUSTICANA (In Italian) J " y K, 

IL SERRAGLIO (In ItaHan) \ 

.. r> ^/Tcii^ f Thursday Evening, December 26, 1929 

JUDITH (American Premiere) (In English) J ' ^ 

LOHENGRIN (In German)— Thursday Evening, February 6, 1930 

RIGOLETTO (In Italian)— Thursday Evening, February 20, 1930 

TIEFLAND (In German)— Wednesday Evening, February 26, 1930 

PIQUE DAME (In Russian)— Thursday Evening, March 6, 1930 

UN BALLO IN MASCHERA (In Itahan)— Thursday Evening, April 10, 1930 

AIDA (In Italian)— Thursday Evening, April 24, 1930 

The repertoire for the season 1929-1930 will be interpreted by eminent artists of 
the lyric world, of which the following is a partial list: 

SOPRANOS: Mary Garden, Marianne Gonitch, Nanette Guilford, Josephine Lucchese, 

Eleanor Painter, Bianca Saroya. Harriet van Emden, Selma Amansky, Natalie 
Bodanskaya, Agnes Davis, Paceli Diamond, Ruth Gordon, Edna Hochstetter, 
Henrietta Horle, Florence Irons, Helen Jepson, Eleanor Lewis, Elsa Meiskey, 
Charlotte Symons, Genia Wilkomirska. 
MEZZO-SOPRANOS: Sophie Braslau, Margaret Matzenauer, Faina Petrova, Cyrena 
Van Gordon. Rose Bampton, Lucia Chagnon, Josephine Jirak, Berta Levina. 

TENORS: Ralph Errolle, Alexandre Kourganoff, Josef Wolinski, Alessandro Angelucci, 
Daniel Healy, Albert Mahler. 

BARITONES: Carroll Ault, John Barclay, Chief Caupolican, Giuseppe Martino-Rossi. 
John Charles Thomas, Mario Valle, Alfred De Long, Beniamino Grobani, Arthur 
Holmgren, Abraham Robofsky, Conrad Thihault. 

BASSES: Augusto Ottone, Ivan Steschenko, CJlarence Reinert. 

CORPS DE BALLET OF ONE HUNDRED 
Catherine Littlefield, Premiere Danseuse 

PRICES — Tax Exempt 
^3.50, ^3.00, ^2.50 ^2.00, ^1.50, ^1.00, 75 Cents and 50 Cents 

Advance orders for all performances will have prompt attention if sent to office of Philadelphia Grand Opera 
Company, 818 Harrison Building, S. W. Cor. 15th and Market Streets (Telephone: Rittenhoutc 3981). Public 
sale of tickets at Heppe's, 1119 Chestnut Street, one week in advance of the dates of the respective performances. 



AJVlhKlL.AJN /\L./\iJbMl of MUML. 



GRAND OPERA — SEASON 1929 - 1930 
THURSDAY EVEMNG, FEBRUARY 20. 1930. AT 8.15 O'CLOCK 

PHILADELPHIA GRAND OPERA COMPANY 

WILLIAM C. HAMMER, General Manager 



RIGOLETTO 



OPERA IN FOUR ACTS 

Text by Francesco Maria Piave, adapted from the drama "Lc Roi S'Amusc," by Victor Hugo 

(In Italian^ 

Music by GIUSEPPE \'ERDI 

THE DUKE OF MANTUA JOSEF WOLINSKI 

RIGOLETTO, the Court Jester, a Hunchback JOHN CHARLES THOMAS 

SPARAFUCILE, an Assassin IVAN STESCHENKO 

COUNT MONTERONE BENI AMINO GROBANI 

BORSA ALBERT MAHLER 

MARULLO CONRAD THIBAULT 

COUNT CEPRANO ALFRED DE LONG 

AN OFFICER ALESSANDRO ANGELUCCI 

COUNTESS CEPRANO HENRIETTA HORLE 

A PAGE SELMA AMANSKY 

GIOVANNA, Companion to Gilda PACELI DIAMOND 

MADDALENA, Sister of Sparafucile JOSEPHINE JIRAK 

GILDA, Daughter of Rigoletto JOSEPHINE LUCCHESE 

Time — Sixteenth Century Place — Mantua 

Incidental Dance in Act I by Corps de Ballet 

CONDUCTOR EMIL MLYNARSKI 

STAGE DIRECTOR U ILHELM yon WYMETAL. Jr. 

SYNOPSIS OF SCENES 
ACT I.— Hall in the Duke's Palace 
ACT II.— House of Rigoletto 
ACT III. — Room in the Duke's Palace 
ACT IV. — Sparafuciles House 

HONORARY MUSICAL DIRECTOR LEOPOLD STOKOWSKI 

DIRECTOR MRS. WM. C. HAMMER 

MUSICAL DIRECTOR AND CONDUCTOR EMIL MLYNARSKI 

STAGE DIRECTOR WILHELM von WYMETAL, JR. 

ASSISTANT CONDUCTOR AND CHORUS MASTER HENRI ELKAN 

ASSISTANT CONDUCTOR SYLVAN LEVIN 

ASSISTANT STAGE MANAGER CHARLES DEMAREST 

BALLET DIRECTOR CAROLINE LITTLEFIELD 

PREMIERE DANSEUSE CATHERINE LITTLEHELD 

ORCHESTRA MANAGER ALEXANDER HILSBERG 

PUBLICITY MARGARET M. WALTON 

Scenery designed by Prof. Alfred Roller, Vienna, and executed by A. Jarin Scenic Studios, Philadelphia. 

Costumes by Consolidated Theatrical Costume Company, New York. 

Wigs by William Punzel, New ^'ork. 

Furniture and Decorations by Chapman Decorative Company, 20th and DeLanccy Streets, Philadelphia. 

The Piano used is the Henry F. Miller — C. J. Heppe &i Son, Agents, 1119 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia. 

The Organ used is the Estey — Estey Reed Organ Studies, 1702 Walnut Street, Philadelphia. 

NEXT PERFORMANCE 

WEDNESDAY EVENING, FEBRUARY 26, 1930, AT 8.15 O'CLOCK 

TIEFLAND 

(In German) 

Mmes. Genia Wilkomirska, Selma Amansky, Natalie Bodanskaya, Paceli Diamond, Eleanor Lewis 

Sim. Pavel Ludikar (courtesy of Metropolitan Opera Co.), Augusto Ottonc, Albert Mahler, 

Beniamino Grobani, Daniel Healy 

CONDUCTOR EMIL MLYNARSKI 

STAGE DIRECTOR WILHELM von WYMETAL, JR. 

NO ADVANCE IN PRICES: $3.50 to 50 cents (tax exempt). Tickets on sale at Heppe's. 1119 Chestnut 
Street, and Philadelphia Grand Opera Company Office, 818 Harrison Building, S. W. Cor. 15th and Market Streets. 
(Telephone RITtenhouse 3981). 



/\jvii:ni^/\iN /^L./^ujtiJVi 1 of Muon^ js 



Philadelphia Grand Opera Company 

REPERTOIRE 

1929 Season — 1930 

("Subject to Change) 

CARMEN (In French)— Wednesday Evening, October 23, 1929 
LE JONGLEUR DE NOTRE DAME (In French)— Thursday Evening, 
October 31, 1929 

MADAMA BUTTERFLY (In Italian)— Thursday Evening, November 14, 1929 

LAKME (In French) — Thursday Evening, November 28. 1929 

PAGLIACCI (In Italian) ^^, ^ ^ 

/^A\7ATTcnTA D 1 1 c -TT/". A x T A /T T 1- \ ? Monday Evcning, Deccmber 9, 1929 

CAVALLERIA RUSTICANA (In Italian) J ^ S' 

IL SERRAGLIO (In Itahan) \ 

Ti inTT'tr /A ^-^ D \ /T R 1 u\ [Thursday Evening, December 26, 1929 

JUUllxl (/\.mencan rremiere) (In English) j ' &• 

LOHENGRIN (In German)— Thursday Evening, February 6, 1930 

RIGOLETTO (In Itahan)— Thursday Evening, February 20, 1930 

TIEFLAND (In German) — Wednesday Evening, February 26, 1930 

LA TRAVIATA (In Itahan)- Thursday Evening, March 6, 1930 

UN BALLO IN MASCHERA (In Italian)— Thursday Evening, April 10, 1930 

AIDA (In Italian) — Thursday Evening, April 24, 1930 

The repertoire for the season 1929-1930 will be interpreted by eminent artists of 
the lyric world, of which the following is a partial list: 

SOPRANOS: Mary Garden, Marianne Gonitch, Nanette Guilford, Josephine Lucchese, 
Eleanor Painter, Bianca Saroya, Harriet van Emden, Selma Amansky, Natalie 
Bodanskaya, Agnes Davis, Paceli Diamond, Ruth Gordon, Edna Hochstetter, 
Henrietta Horle, Florence Irons, Helen Jepson, Eleanor Lewis, Elsa Meiskey, 
Charlotte Symons, Genia Wilkomirska. 

MEZZO-SOPRANOS: Sophie Braslau, Margaret Matzenauer, Faina Petrova, Cyrena 
Van Gordon, Rose Bampton, Lucia Chagnon, Josephine Jirak, Berta Levina. 

TENORS: Ralph Errolle, Alexandre Kourganoif, Josef Wolinski, Alessandro Angelucci, 
Daniel Healy, Albert Mahler. 

BARITONES: Carroll Ault, John Barclay, Chief Caupolican, Giuseppe Martino'Rossi, 
Pavel Ludikar, John Charles Thomas, Mario Valle, Alfred Le Long, Beniamino 
Grobani, Arthur Holmgren, Abraham Robofsky, Conrad Thibault. 

BASSES: Augusto Ottone, Ivan Steschenko, Clarence Reinert. 

CORPS DE BALLET OF ONE HUNDRED 
Catherine Littlefield, Premiere Danseuse 



PRICES — Tax Exempt 
^3.50, ^.00, ^2.50 ^2.00, ^1.50, ^1.00, 75 Cents and 50 Cents 

Advance orders for all performances will have prompt attention if sent to office of Philadelphia Grand Opera 
Company, 818 Harrison Building, S. W. Cor. 15th and Market Streets (Telephone: Rittenhouse 3981). Public 
sale of tickets at Heppe's, 1119 Chestnut Street, one week in advance of the dates of the respective performances. 



A 



i^iViILrtl^/\iN i^^i^JL^ILiVi 1 0| iViUlOl^ 



GRAND OPERA 



SEASON 1929 - 1930 



WEDNESDAY EVENING, FEBRUARY 26, 1930 AT 8.15 O'CLOCK 
PHILADELPHIA GRAND OPERA COMPANY 

VtlLLIAM C. HAMMER, General Manager 

TIEFLAND 

A Music Drama in Two Acts, With a Prologue 

Text by Rudolph Lothar, from the original Catalonian drama "Terra Baixa" 

(The Lowland), by Angel Guimera 

(In German) 

Music by Eugene D'Albert 

SEBASTIANO, a rich land owner PAVEL LUDIKAR 

(Courtesy of Metropolitan Opera Co.) 

TOMMASO, THE VILLAGE ELDER AUGUSTO OTTONE 

MORUCCIO, A MILLER 

MARTA 

PEPA 

ANTONL\ 

ROSALIA 

NURI 

PEDRO, A SHEPHERD 

NANDO, A SHEPHERD , 



In 

- Sebastiano"s 
Service 



.BENIAMINO GROBANI 
..GEXIA W'lLKOMIRSKA 

SELMA AMANSKY 

.NATALIE BODANSKAYA 

PACELI DIAMOND 

ELEANOR LEWIS 

ALBERT MAHLER 

DANIEL HEALY 



CONDUCTOR EMIL MLYNARSKI 

STAGE DIRECTOR WILHELM von WYMETAL, Jr. 

SYNOPSIS OF SCENES 
Prologue — A rocky slope high in the Pyrenees — Just before dawn 
ACT I — Interior of the mill — Sunset of the same day 
ACT II — Same as Act I — Dawn of the following morning 



HONORARY MUSICAL DIRECTOR LEOPOLD STOKOWSKl 

DIRECTOR MRS. WM. C. HAMMER 

MUSICAL DIRECTOR AND CONDUCTOR EMIL MLYNARSKI 

STAGE DIRECTOR WILHELM von WYMETAL, JR. 

ASSISTANT CONDUCTOR AND CHORUS MASTER HENRI ELKAN 

ASSISTANT CONDUCTOR SYLVAN LEVIN 

ASSISTANT STAGE MANAGER CHARLES DEMAREST 

BALLET DIRECTOR CAROLINE LITTLEFIELD 

<"• 4 THKn IME T TTTT FF IFLD 
^G 

3N 



Owing to illness Mr. PAVEL LUDIKAR 

will be unable to appear this evening. 

The role of Sebastiano will be sung by 

Mr. CONRAD THIBAULT. 



id; 



nut 
tu. 



Philadelphia Grand Opera Company 

REPERTOIRE 

1929 Season — 1930 

(^Subject to Change) 

CARMEN (In French)— Wednesday Evening. October 2 J, 1929 

LE JONGLEUR DE NOTRE DAME (In French)— Thursday Evening, 

October 31, 1929 

MADAMA BUTTERFLY (In Italian)— Thursday Evening, November U, 1929 

LAKME (In French)— Thursday Evening, November 28. 1929 

PAGLIACCI (In Italian) ^ w . ,. . t. , . ,^.. 

r^ A\7 AT T TJDT A niic-TT/^AXTA /T T 1 \ >^ Monday Evcning, Deccmber 9, 1 9 29 
CAVALLERIA RUSTICANA (In Italian) J 

IL SERRAGLIO (In Italian) \ 

iTTTM-TT-r I A o \ /T c 1 u\ [Thursday Evening, December 26, 1929 

JUDITH {Amencan Premiere) (In English) J ' &• 

LOHENGRIN (In German)— Thursday Evening, February 6, 1930 

RIGOLETTO (In Itahan)— Thursday Evening, February 20, 1930 

TIEFLAND (In German)— Wednesday Evening, February 26, 1930 

LA TRAVIATA (In Italian)— Thursday Evening, March 6, 1930 

UN BALLO IN MASCHERA (In Italian)— Thursday Evening, April 10, 1930 

AIDA (In Italian)— Thursday Evening, April 24, 1930 

The repertoire for the season 1929'1930 will be interpreted by eminent artists of 
the lyric world, of which the following is a partial list: 

SOPRANOS: Mary Garden, Marianne Gonitch, Nanette Guilford, Josephine Lucchese, 

Eleanor Painter, Bianca Saroya, Harriet van Emden, Selma Amansky, Natalie 
Bodanskaya, Agnes Davis, Paceli Diamond, Ruth Gordon, Edna Hochstetter, 
Henrietta Horle, Florence Irons, Helen Jepson, Eleanor Lewis, Elsa Meiskey, 
Charlotte Symons, Genia Wilkomirska. 

MEZZO-SOPRANOS: Sophie Braslau, Margaret Matzenauer, Faina Petrova, Cyrena 
Van Gordon, Rose BamDton. Lucia nhacmnn TnspnKi'n^ T.v^i, r«,»~ t „..._- 



-[ 



/\MJtKlL./\iN AL^AULMI ot MUML. 



GRAND OPERA — SEASON 1929 - 1930 

WEDNESDAY EVENING, FEBRUARY 26, 1930 AT 8.15 O'CLOCK 
PHILADELPHIA GRAND OPERA COMPANY 

WILUAM C. HAMMER, General Manager 



TIEFLAND 



A Music Drama in Two Acts, With a Prologue 

Text hy Rudolph Lothar, from the original Catalonian drama "Terra Baixa" 

(The Lowland), by Angel Guimera 

(In German) 

Music by Eugene D'Albert 

SEBASTIANO, a rich land owner PAVEL LUDIKAR 

(Courtesy of Metropolitan Opera Co.) 

TOMMASO, THE VILLAGE ELDER AUGUSTO OTTONE 

MORUCCIO, A MILLER 

MARTA 

PEPA 

ANTONIA 

ROSALIA 

NURI 

PEDRO, A SHEPHERD 

NANDO, A SHEPHERD 



In 

Sebastiano's 
Service 



. . .BENIAMINO GROBANI 
. .GENIA WILKOMIRSKA 

SELMA AMANSKY 

.NATALIE BODANSKAYA 

PACELI DIAMOND 

ELEANOR LEWIS 

ALBERT MAHLER 

DANIEL HEALY 



CONDUCTOR EMIL MLYNARSKI 

STAGE DIRECTOR WILHELM von WYMETAL, Jr. 

SYNOPSIS OF SCENES 
Prologue — A rocky slope high in the Pyrenees — Just before dawn 
ACT I — Interior of the mill — Sunset of the same day 
ACT II — Same as Act I — Dawn of the following morning 



HONORARY MUSICAL DIRECTOR LEOPOLD STOKOWSKI 

DIRECTOR MRS. WM. C. HAMMER 

MUSICAL DIRECTOR AND CONDUCTOR EMIL MLYNARSKI 

STAGE DIRECTOR WILHELM von WYMETAL, JR. 

ASSISTANT CONDUCTOR AND CHORUS MASTER HENRI ELKAN 

ASSISTANT CONDUCTOR SYLVAN LEVIN 

ASSISTANT STAGE MANAGER CHARLES DEMAREST 

BALLET DIRECTOR CAROLINE LITTLEFIELD 

PREMIERE DANSEUSE CATHERINE LITTLEFIELD 

ORCHESTRA MANAGER ALEXANDER HILSBERG 

PUBLICITY MARGARET M. WALTON 

Scenery by Teichner Studios, New York. 

Costumes by Consolidated Theatrical Costume Company, New York. 

Wigs by William Punzel, New York. 

Furniture and Decorations by Chapman Decorative Company, 20th and DeLancey Streets, Philadelphia. 

The Piano used is the Henry P. Miller — C. J. Heppe 8C Son, Agents, 1119 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia. 

The Organ used is the Estey — Estey Reed Organ Studies, 1702 Walnut Street, Philadelphia. 

NEXT PERFORMANCE 

THURSDAY EVENING, MARCH 6, 1930, AT 8.15 O'CLOCK 

LA TRAVIATA 

(In Italian) 

Mmes. Josephine Lucchese (last appearance here this season), Helen Jepson, Paceli Diamond; 
Mm. Alexandre Kourganoff, Mario Valle, Albert Mahler, Arthur Holmgren, Enrico Giovanni, 

Alfred De Long 

CONDUCTOR EMIL MLYNARSKI 

STAGE DIRECTOR WILHELM von WYMETAL. JR. 

NO ADVANCE IN PRICES: $3.50 to 50 cents (tax exempt). Tickets on sale at Heppe's. 1119 Chestnut 
Street, and Philadelphia Grand Opera Company Office, 818 Harrison Building. S. W. Cor. 15th and Market Streets 
(Telephone RITtenhouse 3981). 



AMbKlUAN AUAUbMI ot MUML. 



Philadelphia Grand Opera Company 

REPERTOIRE 

1 929 — Season — 1 930 

('Subject to Change) 

CARMEN (In French)— Wednesday Evening, October 23. 1929 

LE JONGLEUR DE NOTRE DAME (In French)— Thursday Evening, 

October 31, 1929 
MADAMA BUTTERFLY (In Italian)— Thursday Evening, November 14, 1929 
LAKME (In French) — Thursday Evening, November 28. 1929 



^Monday Evening, December 9, 1929 



PAGLIACCI (In Italian) 
CAVALLERIA RUSTICANA (In Italian) 

IL SERRAGLIO (In Italian) \ x. ^ «.o 

TTTTMT^u /A D • \ /T Tj T u\ | Thursday Evening. December 26, 1929 

JUDITH (American Premiere) (In English) J ■' " 

LOHENGRIN (In German)— Thursday Evening, February 6. 1930 

RIGOLETTO (In Italian)— Thursday Evening, February 20, 1930 

TIEFLAND (In German)— Wednesday Evening, February 26. 1930 

LA TRAVIATA (In Italian)— Thursday Evening, March 6, 1930 

UN BALLO IN MASCHERA (In Itahan)— Thursday Evening, April 10, 1930 

AIDA (In Italian)— Thursday Evening, April 24, 1930 

The repertoire for the season 1929-1930 will be interpreted by eminent artists of 
the lyric world, of which the followii.g is a partial hst: 

SOPRANOS: Mary Garden, Marianne Gonitch, Nanette Guilford, Josephine Lucchese, 

Eleanor Painter, Bianca Saroya, Harriet van Emden, Selma Amansky, Natalie 
Bodanskaya, Agnes Davis, Paceli Diamond, Ruth Gordon, Edna Hochstetter, 
Henrietta Horle, Florence Irons, Helen Jepson, Eleanor Lewis, Elsa Meiskey. 
Charlotte Symons, Genia Wilkomirska. 
MEZZO-SOPRANOS: Sophie Braslau, Margaret Matzenauer, Faina Petrova, Cyrena 
Van Gordon, Rose Bampton, Lucia Chagnon, Josephine Jirak, Berta Levina. 

TENORS: Ralph Errolle, Alexandre Kourganoff, Josef Wolinski, Alessandro Angelucci, 
Daniel Healy, Albert Mahler. 

BARITONES: Carroll Ault, John Barclay, Chief Caupolican, Giuseppe Martino-Rossi, 
Pavel Ludikar, John Charles Thomas, Mario Valle, Alfred Le Long, Beniamino 
Grobani, Arthur Holmgren, Abraham Robofsky, Conrad Thibault. 

BASSES: Augusto Ottone, Ivan Steschenko, Clarence Reinert. 

CORPS DE BALLET OF ONE HUNDRED 
Catherine Littlefield, Premiere Danseuse 



PRICES — Tax Exempt 
^3.50, ^3.00, ^2.50 ^2.00, ^1.50, ^1.00, 75 Cents and 50 Cents 

Advance orderi for all performances will have prompt attention if sent to office of Philadelphia Grand Opera 
Company, 818 Harrison Building, S. W. Cor. 15th and Market Streets (Telephone: Rittcnhouse 3981). Public 
sale of tickets at Heppe's, 1119 Chestnut Street, one week in advance of the dates of the respective performances. 



/\Mi:KlL./\iN i^L./^UnJVi I 0| JViUDlL. 



GRAND OPERA — SEASON 1929 - 1930 
THURSDAY EVENING, MARCH 6, 1930, AT 8.15 O'CLOCK 

PHILADELPHIA GRAND OPERA COMPANY 

WILUAM C. HAMMER, General Manager 

LA TRAVIATA 

Opera in Four Acts 

Text by Francesco Maria Piave; adapted from the play. "La Dame aux Camclias"; by 

Alexandre Dumas, Jr. 
(In Italian) 

Music by GIUSEPPE VERDI 

VIOLETTA JOSEPHINE LUCCHESE 

FLORA HELEN JEPSON 

ANNINA PACELI DIAMOND 

ALFREDO GERMONT ALEXANDRE KOURGANOFF 

GIORGIO GERMONT MARIO VALLE 

GASTONE ALBERT MAHLER 

BARON DAUPHOL ALFRED DE LONG 

MARQUIS D'OBIGN Y ARTHUR HOLMGREN 

DOCTOR GRENVIL ENRICO GIOVANNI 

GIUSEPPE ALESSANDRO ANGELUCCI 

Incidental Dances by Corps dc Ballet 

CONDUCTOR EMIL MLYNARSKI - 

STAGE DIRECTOR WILHELM von WYMETAL, Jr. 

SYNOPSIS OF SCENES 
ACT I — Salon in the house of Violetta 
ACT II — Garden of a country house near Paris. 
ACT III — Ballroom in the house of Flora 
AQT IV — Violetta's bed-chamber 



HONORARY MUSICAL DIRECTOR LEOPOLD STOKOWSKl 

DIRECTOR MRS. WM. C. HAMMER 

MUSICAL DIRECTOR AND CONDUCTOR EMIL MLYNARSKI 

STAGE DIRECTOR WILHELM von WYMETAL. JR. 

ASSISTANT CONDUCTOR AND CHORUS MASTER HENRI ELKAN 

ASSISTANT CONDUCTOR SYLVAN LEVIN 

ASSISTANT STAGE MANAGER CHARLhS DEMARhST 

BALLET DIRECTOR CAROLINE LITTLEFIELD 

PREMIERE DANSEUSE CATHERINE LITTLEFIELD 

ORCHESTRA MANAGER ALEXANDER HILSBERG 

Scenery by A.^ Jarin Scenic Studios, PliiKidelphia. 

Costumes by Consolidated Theatrical Costume Company, Xcw York. 

\\ igs by William Punzel, New York. 

Furniture and Decorations by Chapman Decorative Company, 20th and DeLancey Sts., Philadelphia. 

Banquet Tables and Decora. ions bv Beilevue-Strattord Hotel, Phdadelphia. 

Flowers by H. H. Battles, 114 South 12th St., Philadelphia. 

The Piano used is the Henry F. Miller— C. J. Heppe & Son, Agents, 1119 Chestnut St., Philadelphia. 



NEXT PERFORMANCE 

Thursday Evening, April 10, 1930, at 8.15 ©'Clock 

UN BALLO IN MASCHERA 

(In Italian) 

Mmes. Bianca Saroya. Faina Petrova, Henrietta Horle. 

Mm. John Charles Thomas, Alexandre Kourganoff, Ivan Steschenko. Beniamino Grobani. 

Abraham Robofsky, Alfred De Long, Daniel Healy. 

CONDUCTOR EMIL MLYNARSKI 

STAGE DIRECTOR WILHELM von WYMETAL, JR. 

NO ADVANCE IN PRICES: $3.50 to 50 cents (tax exempt). Tickets on sale at Heppe's, 1119 Chestnut 
Street, and Philadelphia Grand Opera Company Office, 818 Harrison Buildmg, S. W. Cor. 15th and Market Streets, 
(Telephone RITtenhouse 3981). 



/AlVii:rtlV^/MN /A^^/AL>'ILiVi 1 O] lViL>l01^^ 



>o 



Philadelphia Grand Opera Company 

REPERTOIRE 

1 929 — Season — 1 930 

("Subject to Change) 

CARMEN (In French)— Wednesday Evening. October 23, 1929 

LE JONGLEUR DE NOTRE DAME (In French)— Thursday Evening. 

October 31, 1929 
MADAMA BUTTERFLY (In ItaHan)— Thursday Evening, November 14. 1929 
LAKME (In French)— Thursday Evening, November 28. 1929 



^Monday Evening, December 9, 1929 



PAGLIACCI (In Italian) 

CAVALLERIA RUSTICANA (In Italian) 

IL SERRAGLIO (In ItaUan) \ 

TT iTNTTtj /A D \/TDiL\ fThursday Evening, December 26, 1929 

JUDITH (American Premiere) (In English) J ' &• 

LOHENGRIN (In German)— Thursday Evening, February 6. 1930 

RIGOLETTO (In Italian)— Thursday Evening, February 20, 1930 

TIEFLAND (In German)— Wednesday Evening, February 26. 1930 

LA TRAVIATA (In Italian)— Thursday Evening, March 6, 1930 

UN BALLO IN MASCHERA (In Italian)— Thursday Evening, April 10, 1930 

AIDA (In Italian)— Thursday Evening. April 24, 1930 

The repertoire for the season 1929' 1930 will be interpreted by eminent artists of 
the lyric world, of which the following is a partial list: 

SOPRANOS: Mary Garden, Marianne Gonitch, Nanette Guilford, Josephine Lucchese, 
Eleanor Painter, Bianca Saroya, Harriet van Emden, Selma Amansky, Natalie 
Bodanskaya, Agnes Davis, Paceli Diamond, Ruth Gordon, Edna Hochstetter, 
Henrietta Horle, Florence Irons, Helen Jepson, Eleanor Lewis, Elsa Meiskey, 
Charlotte Symons, Genia Wilkomirska. 

MEZZO-SOPRANOS: Sophie Braslau, Margaret Matzenauer, Faina Petrova, Cyrena 
Van Gordon, Rose Bampton, Lucia Chagnon, Josephine Jirak, Berta Levina. 

TENORS: Ralph Errolle, Alexandre Kourganoff, Josef Wolinski, Alessandro Angelucci, 
Daniel Healy, Albert Mahler. 

BARITONES: Carroll Ault, John Barclay, Chief Caupolican, Giuseppe Martino-Rossi, 
Pavel Ludikar, John Charles Thomas, Mario Valle, Alfred Lc Long. Beniamino 
Grobani, Arthur Holmgren, Abraham Robofsky, Conrad Thihaiilt. 

BASSES: Augusto Ottone, Ivan Steschenko, Clarence Reinert. 

CORPS DE BALLET OF ONE HUNDRED 
Catherine Littlefield, Premiere Danseuse 



PRICES — Tax Exempt 
^3.50, ^3.00, ^2.50 ^2.00, ^1.50, ^1.00, 75 Cents and 50 Cents 

Advance ordera for all performances will have prompt attention if acnt to office of Philadelphia Grand Opera 
Company, 818 Harriaon Building, S. W. Cor. 15th and Market Streets (Telephone: Rittenhouse 3981). Public 
■ale ol tickatt at Heppe'a, 1119 Cheatnut Street, on* week in advanc* of the datea of the respective performancea. 



/\wicti,i^/\rsi /\y^/\uc.£^L i ot iviuioiv^ 



GRAND OPERA — SEASON 1929 - 1930 
THURSDAY EVENING, APRIL 10, 1930, AT 8.15 O'CLOCK 

PHILADELPHIA GRAND OPERA COMPANY 

WILUAM C. HAMMER, General MaiMgw 

UN BALLO IN MASCHERA 

opera in Five Acts 

Text by Francesco Maria Piave, from Antonio Somma's translation of the book by Augustin 
Eugene Scribe for the opera "Gustave III ou Le Bal Masque," by Daniel Francois Esprit Auber. 

(In Italian) 

Music by GIUSEPPE VERDI 

RICCARDO. Duke of Olivarez ALEXANDRE KOURGANOFF 

RENATO. his Secretary JOHN CHARLES THOMAS 

AMELIA. Renatos Wife BIANCA SAROYA 

ULRICA, a Gypsy Fortune Teller FAINA PETROVA 

OSCAR, the Dukes Page HENRIETTA HORLE 

SILVANO. a Sailor BENIAMINO GROBANI 

FRANCESCO ) ^^ , u t^ v n ^ n i IVAN STESCHENKO 

ANTONIO ) Officers of the Duke s Guards— Conspirators | ABRAHAM ROBOFSKY 

THE SUPREME JUDGi ALFRED DE LONG 

A SERVANT OF AMELIA DANIEL HEALY 

Incidental Dances by Corps de Ballet 
Time — Early part of the 17th Century. Place — Naples. 

CONDUCTOR EMIL MLYNARSKI 

STAGE DIRECTOR WILHELM von WYMETAL, Jr. 

NOTE — The orchestra is composed of members of the orchestra of The Curtis Institute of Music, augmented 
for this occasion by twelve professional players. 

SYNOPSIS OF SCENES 
ACT I— Hall in the Palace of the Duke 
ACT II— House of Ulrica 
ACT III — Rocky Height near Naples 
ACT IV — A Room in Renatos House 
ACT V — Scene 1 — A Small Room in the Palace 
Scene 2 — A Garden of the Palace 



HONORARY MUSICAL DIRECTOR LEOPOLD STOKOWSKI 

DIRECTOR MRS. WM. C. HAMMER 

MUSICAL DIRECTOR AND CONDUCTOR EMIL MLYNARSKI 

STAGE DIRECTOR WILHELM von WYMETAL. JR. 

ASSISTANT CONDUCTOR AND CHORUS MASTER ...HENRI ELKAN 

ASSISTANT CONDUCTOR SYLVAN LEVIN 

ASSISTANT STAGE MANAGER CHARLES DEMAREST 

BALLET DIRECTOR CAROLINE LITTLEFIELD 

PREMIERE DANSEUSE CATHERINE LITTLEFIELD 

ORCHESTRA MANAGER ALEXANDER HILSBERG 

Scenery by A. Jarin Scenic Studios, Philadelphia. 

Costumes by Consolidated Theatrical Costume Company, New York. 

Wigs by William Punzel, New York. , , u- 

Furniture and Decorations by Chapman Decorative Company, 20th and DeLancey Sts., Philadelphia. 

The Piano used is the Henry F. Miller— C. J. Heppe & Son, Agents, 1119 Chestnut St., Philadelphia. 

LAST PERFORMANCE OF THE SEASON 

Thursday Evening, April 24, 1930, at 8.15 o'Clock 

AIDA 

(In Italian) 

Mmes. Marianne Gonitch, Cyrena Van Gordon (Courtesy of the Chicago Civic Opera Company), 

Florence Irons. 

Mm. John Charles Thomas, Josef Wolinski, Ivan Steschenko, Leo de Hierapolis, Albert Mahler. 

Spectacular Ballet by Catherine Littlefield, Premiere Danseuse, and Corps de Ballet of 80. 

Ensemble of 300. New and elaborate scenic investiture. 

CONDUCTOR EMIL MLYNARSKI 

STAGE DIRECTOR WILHELM von WYMETAL. JR. 

NO ADVANCE IN PRICES: $3.50 to SO ccnt» (t»i eiempt). Tickets on tale at Heppe's, 1119 Che«tnut 
Street. »nd Philadelphia Grand Opera Company Office, lit Harriion Building. S. W. Cor. 15th and Market Street!, 
(Telephone RITtenhouie 3981). 



Philadelphia Grand Opera Company 

REPERTOIRE 

1929 — Season — 1930 

('Subject to Change) 

CARMEN (In French)— Wednesday Evening, October 23, 1929 

LE JONGLEUR DE NOTRE DAME (In French)— Thursday Evening. 

October 31, 1929 
MADAMA BUTTERFLY (In Italian)— Thursday Evening, November 14. 1929 
LAKME (In French) — Thursday Evening, November 28. 1929 



?Monday Evening, December 9, 1929 



PAGLIACCI (In Italian) 
CAVALLERIA RUSTICANA (In Italian) 

IL SERRAGLIO (In Itahan) \ 

iiTT-^TT-'Lj /A D \ / T 17 1 ' 1 \ [Thursday Evening, December 26, 1929 

JUDITH (American Premxere) (In English) j ■' «" 

LOHENGRIN (In German)— Thursday Evening, February 6, 1930 

RIGOLETTO (In Itahan)— Thursday Evening, February 20, 1930 

TIEFLAND (In German)— Wednesday Evening, February 26, 1930 

LA" TRAVIATA (In Italian)— Thursday Evening, March 6, 1930 

UN BALLO IN MASCHERA (In Itahan)— Thursday Evening, April 10, 1930 

AIDA (In Itahan)— Thursday Evening, April 24, 1930 

The repertoire for the season 1929-1930 will be interpreted by eminent artists of 
the lyric world, of which the following is a partial hst: 

SOPRANOS: Mary Garden, Marianne Gonitch, Nanette Guilford, Josephine Lucchese, 
Eleanor Painter, Bianca Saroya, Harriet van Emden, Selma Amansky, Natalie 
Bodanskaya, Agnes Davis, Paceli Diamond, Ruth Gordon, Edna Hochstetter, 
Henrietta Horle, Florence Irons, Helen Jepson, Eleanor Lewis, Elsa Meiskey, 
Charlotte Symons, Genia Wilkomirska. ;\' 

MEZZO-SOPRANOS: Sophie Braslau, Margaret Matzenauer, Faina Petrova, Cyreniu 
Van Gordon, Rose Bampton, Lucia Chagnon, Josephine Jirak, Berta Levina. 

TENORS: Ralph Errolle, Alexandre Kourganotf, Josef Wolinski, Alessandro Angelucci, 
Daniel Healy, Albert Mahler. 

BARITONES: Carroll Ault, John Barclay, Chief Caupolican, Giuseppe Martino-Rossi, 
Pavel Ludikar, John Charles Thomas, Mario Valle, Alfred Le Long, Beniamino 
Grobani, Arthur Holmgren, Abraham Robofsky, Conrad Thibault. 

BASSES: Augusto Ottone, Ivan Steschenko, Clarence Reinert. 

CORPS DE BALLET OF ONE HUNDRED 
Catherine Littlefield, Premiere Danseuse 



PRICES — Tax Exempt 
^3.50, ^3.00, ^2.50 ^2.00, ^1.50, ^1.00, 75 Cents and 50 Cents 

Advance orderi for all performances will have prompt attention if sent to office of Philadelphia Grand Opera 
Company, 818 Harrison Building, S. W. Cor. 15th and Market Streets (Telephone: Rittenhouse 3981). Public 
■ale of ticket! at Heppe's, 1119 Chestnut Street, one week in advance of the dates of the respective performances. 



AMtlilUAN ACAUbMY of MUblC 



GRAND OPERA — SEASON 1929 - 1930 

Thursday Evening, April 24, 1930, at 8.15 o'Clock 

PHILADELPHIA GRAND OPERA COMPANY 

WILLIAM C. HAMMER, General Manager 

AIDA 

Opera in Four Acts 

Text hy Antonio Ghislanzcni 

(In Italian) 

Music by GIUSEPPE VERDI 

THE KING LEO de HIERAPOLIS 

AMNERIS CYRENA VAN GORDON 

(Courtesy of Chicago Civic Opera Co.) 

AIDA MARIANNE GONITCH 

RADAMES JOSEF WOLINSKI 

AMONASRO JOHN CHARLES THOMAS 

RAMFIS IVAN STESCHENKO 

A MESSENGER ALBERT MAHLER 

A PRIESTESS FLORENCE IRONS 

Dances by CATHERINE LITTLEFIELD, Premiere Danseuse 
and Corps de Ballet 

CONDUCTOR EMIL MLYNARSKI 

STAGE DIRECTOR WILHELM von WYMETAL, Jr. 

SYNOPSIS OF SCENES 
ACT I. Scene 1 — A Hall in the Palace of Pharaoh 
Scene 2 — The Temple of Ptah 

ACT II. Scene 1 — Amneris' Room in the Palace 
Scene 2 — The Gates of Thebes 

ACT III. The Temple of Isis on the River Nile 

ACT IV. Scene 1--A Hall in the Palace of Pharaoh 

Scene 2 — The Temple of Ptah and Crypt Beneath 



HONORARY MUSICAL DIRECTOR LEOPOLD STOKOWSKI 

DIRECTOR MRS. WILLIAM C. HAMMER 

MUSICAL DIRECTOR AND CONDUCTOR EMIL MLYNARSKI 

STAGE DIRECTOR WILHELM von WYMETAL. JR. 

ASSISTANT CONDUCTOR AND CHORUS MASTER HENRI ELKAN 

ASSISTANT CONDUCTOR SYLVAN LEVIN 

ASSISTANT STAGE MANAGER CHARLES DEMAREST 

BALLET DIRECTOR CAROLINE LITTLEFIELD 

PREMIERE DANSEUSE CATHERINE LITTLEFIELD 

ORCHESTRA MANAGER ALEXANDER HILSBERG 

Scenery by A. Jarin Scenic Studios, Philadelphia. 

Costumes by Consolidated Thea.rical Costume Company, New York. 

Wigs by William Punzel, New York. 

Furniture and Decorations by Chapman Decorative Company, 20th and DeLancey Sts., Philadelphia. 

The Piano used is the Henry F. Miller — C. J. Heppe & Son, Agents. 1119 Chestnut St., Philadelphia. 



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STORY OF THE OPERA 

By Samuel L. Laciar 



AIDA 

By GIUSEPPE VERDI 

■'Aida," the lueiity-seventh of the thirty operas of 
(iius^ppe \'erdi (including two rewritten ones in thi? 
numher) is, in some respects, the most remarkable of all 
operas. In the first place, it is one of two instances where 
a musical composition, written to a definite order, has 
proved to be a great masterpiece, the other being the 
"Requiem" of Mozart. The history of music shows that 
most works composed in these circumstances have been 
routine and hackneyed. In the second place, the opera 
was composed at an age when most composers have long 
since ceased the labor of musical creation. Verdi was 
nearly sixty years of age when "Aida" was composed and, 
when its merits were instant!}' accepted, it was generally 
assumed that it would be the last opera of his distin- 
guished career. But sixteen years later he produced 
"Otello," and some year.s later, in his eightieth year, 
he composed "Pals' affo," respectively the greatest tragedy 
and the greatest comedy of the Italian operatic repertoire. 
But, in human and musical appeal, "Aida" stands above 
even these superlative masterpieces. 

"Aida" was completed in 1871, being now (1930) fifty- 
nine years of age and still retains all of its power, if, 
indeed, its charm and beauty have been enhanced by the 
passing of the years. It is certainly, the most popular 
opera on the stage today and this, too, appears to grow as 
ime goes on. For many years, "II Trovatore" and 
"Faust" were the two operas most frequently performed, 
but today, "Aida," although composed much later, has 
unquestionably passed them both in the matter of total 
Ijerformances. In one season, in Philadelphia alone, 
"Aida" was presented seven times. 

The opera was composed by Verdi on a commission 
given by Ishmael Pasha, then Khedive of Egypt, for the 
opening of a new opera house in Cairo, which was to be 
one of the largest and most beautiful in the world. The 
ruler desired an opera on an Egyptian subject and wanted 
the most eminent operatic composer then living (Verdi) 
to write it. The terms were liberal and Verdi set about 
the work with enthusiasm. The work of composition did 
not take long, although the opera was not written wi.h 
:he speed which marked the production of "Trovatore," 
"Kigoletto" and Traviata" about twenty years earlier. 

The story of "Aida" is actually a legendary Egyptian 
tale of great antiquity and not a plot made up, as so 
many operatic stories are, by a librettist. The original 
story was discovered by Mariette Bey, a famous Egyptol- 
ogist, who happened across it in the course of his 
researches. The idea was submitted to \'erdi by represen- 
tatives of the Khedive and met with his instant approval. 
Great care was taken with the preparation of the libretto, 
the story being first translated into French prose by 
C'amille de Locle, with the assistance of \'erdi, and then 
placed in the hands of Antonio (jhislanzoni, \'erdi's last 
librettist before Arrigo Boito. The opera was produced 
wi.h enormous success at Cairo on Christmas Eve of 
1871. Verdi had been invited to attend and conduct, but. 
always averse to travel into foreign countries, he 
declined. 



The music is notable above all things, with its intrinsic 
beauty and fitness to tbe dramatic situations of the opera, 
for the fact that it is a complete departure from the 



convenional Italian style of opera which Verdi had fol- 
lowed consistently up to that tiine. It is full of Egyptian 
color, but only in the Temple Scene (the second seem- 
of the first act) is any authentic Egyptian music useil. 
But, as Bizet did in "Carmen," the music, although orig 
inal with the composer, is so imbued with the atmosphere 
of the land in which the opera is laid, that it sounds as 
though the entire musical fabric were national in its 
origin. 

The time of the opera is that of the later Pharaohs, 
and the scenes are laid in the ancient Egyptian cities of 
-Memphis and Thebes. Aida is a slave girl who, unknown 
,o her captors, is the daughter of the King of Ethiopia 
( Amonasro) and has been placed in the service of 
.Vmneris, daughter of the King of the Egyptians. 
Radames, a young Egyptian warrior, is greatly in love 
with the beautiful slave girl and is beloved by her and 
also by the Princess Amneris. 

The first act opens with the pioclama ion that the 
ELhiopians under King Amonasro have rebelled againsit 
the authority of the Egyptians and that a leader of the 
Egyptian armies must be chosen at once. TIil- choice falls 
upon Radames who, in the second scene of the act, 
receives the sword consecrated to the service of the god 
Ptah (Vulcan) and departs for the war. The second 
act opens in the apartment of the Princess Amneris and, 
it the close, there is a dramatic scene between Amneris 
aii<l .\ida. Th Princess suspects that she has a powerful 
rival for the affections of Radames and she wrests the 
secret from Aida by declaring that Radames has been 
killed in battle. The second scene shows Radames return-, 
■.ng victorious, with trophies and captives, among 
latter the King, Amonasro, althoitgh his captors do 
know his identity. The priests, led by the High Prid 
Ramlis, demand the death of all the prisoners, but 
appeals of the people and finally Radames himself mo^ 
the King to release them, holding only Aida and Amon 
asro as hostages. This scene is one of the most impressiv. 
in all opera, musically, scenically and dramatically. 

Thu third act is the famous "Nile Scene." .\mneris, 
accompanied by the High Priest, repairs to the temple tu 
pray, on the eve of her marriage to Radames. Aida, 
expecting to meet Radaines, is confronted by her father, 
Amonasro, who demands that she learn from Radames the 
plans of the Egyptians in their second invasion of 
Ethiopia. She refuses, but, after a very strong scene, 
finally consents. Radames appears and, after much plead- 
ing, finally tells Aida the plans of the Egyptian army, 
which Amonasro overhears. .'\.t this point, Amneris and 
the High Priest emerge from the temple. Radames. Aid 
:iii<l Amonasro flee, pursued by the guards, hut Radami - 
returns, surrenders his swonl to the High Priest and 
awaits his trial for treason. 

The last act is in two scenes. The first is in toa 
outer hall of the temple where Amneris alone OVtU 
hears Radames being tried by the priests for treason, alS 
stands almost alone in all opera for contralto, both g| 
voice and dramatic action. Radames is convicted an"* 
sentenced to be entombed alive in the subterranean vault- 
of the temple and .\mneris appeals vainly to the i)riest- 
as they reappear. The final scene is in the subterranean 
chamber to which Radames has been taken. There li< 
finds Aida, who has succeeded in evading the guards 
:^nc joins him in death. The opera closes as the lovei^ 
die, while .\mnev\s, broken-hearted, kneels in prayer over 
their living tomb. 










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